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Full text of "Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine"

MARYLAND & RARE B'OOK ROOftf 
UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND LIBRARY" 
COLLEGE PARK, MD. 



lm. 7-7-44. 

PROPERTY OF 

THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD 
RESEARCH LIBRARY 

presented by Secretary f s Office - 



date Ma£ , 3 _£L 

MEMO: 




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Putting a Roof Over Your Head 

^ The old fashioned house raising was an event in the early 
history of this country. A man got his lot shaped up and the 
frame of his house ready; then he called his neighbors together 
and they pushed his house up in a jiffy. 

*J But you don't need to call your neighbors from their work to 
help you put a, roof on your house. 

<J Write to Division " S," Baltimore and Ohio Relief Department, 
Baltimore, Md., and learn how quickly you can draw on the 
resources of the Savings Feature and obtain the assistance which 
will make you the owner of your own home. 

<I The Relief Department has properties at various points on the 
System and will be glad to sell them to employes on the monthly 
payment plan. 



PleOH mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAOAZLXE 




The Only Girl Who 
\ Commanded a 

Nation's Armies 



A simple little girl of sixteen played 
one day in a little lost village. The 
next year, in supreme command of all 
the troops of France, she led them in 
triumph to victory. 

Great dukes bowed before this girl, 
who could not read. Sinful men, men 
who had cursed and drunk and mur- 
dered all their days, followed her 
meekly. 

It is the most dramatic, the most 
amazing story in the whole story of 
human life. In the dim, far-off past, 
Joan of Arc went her shining way in 
France — and her story was never told 
as it should have been till it was told 
by an American — 



MARK TWAIN 



To us whose chuckles had turned to tears over 
the pathos of "Huckleberry Finn" — to us who 
felt the cutting edge of "Innocents Abroad" — 
the coming of "Joan of Arc" from the pen of 
Mark Twain was no surprise. 

The story began as an anonymous romance in 
Harper's Magazine, but within a few months the 
secret was out. Who but Mark Twain could 
have written it? Who could have written this 



book that has almost the simplicity, the loftiness 
of the Bible — but with a whimsical touch which 
makes it human? Mark Twain's Joan of Arc is 
no cold statue in a church — no bronze on a 
pedestal, but a warm, human, loving girl. 
Read "Joan of Arc" if you would read the most 
sublime thing that has come from the pen of any 
American. Read "Joan of Arc" if you would 
know Mark Twain in all his greatness. It is ac- 
curate history told in warm story form. 



The Price Goes Up 



Great American 

Born poor — growing up in 
shabby little town on the Mis- 
sissippi — a pilot — a seeker for 
gold — a printer — Mark Twain 
was molded on the frontier of 
America. 

The vastness of the West — the 
fearlessness of the pioneer — the 
clear philosophy of the country 
boy were his — and they stayed 
with him in all simplicity to the 
last day of those glorious later 
days — when German Emperor 
and English King — Chinese 
Mandarin and plain American, 
all alike, wept for him. 



25 VOLUMES 
Novels— Stories— Humor— Essays — Travels- 
History 

This is Mark Twain's own set. This is the set 
he wanted in the home of each of those who J 
love him. Mark Twain knew what hard 4 
imes meant. Because he asked it, Har- 4 
per's have worked to make a perfect set f 
at a reduced price. 4 
Before the war we had a contract price # Ba '5''"" r 
for paper, so we cou'd sell this set of J> 1 
Mark Twain at half price. 4 

Send Coupon Without Money 
The last of the edition is in A 



sight. The 
has gone up. 



price of paper 
There never 



E. M. 
HARPER 
# & BROTHERS 
New York: 



end m 



a 1 1 



Harper S Brothers, New YorK 



again will be any more WtBBRJS 
Mark Twain at the prcs- 4 j n 25 volumes, illustrated, 
ent price. Get the 25 * bound in handsome green 
volumes now while +r cloth, stamped in gold, gold 
you can 4 <°P S ancl deckled edges. If 

S'nur children want 9 not satisfactory-, I will return 
Mark Tw.i Ym /them at your expense. Otherwise 

Mark twain. You 41 wiU seIlcl you $1.00 within 5 
want him. Send 4 days and $2.00 a month for 12 
thiscouponto- f months, thus getting the benefit of 
day — now — 4 your half-price sale, 
while you 4 
are look- j4 ,., 

ingatit. * Tswu: 

4 

4 Address 



Please mention our magazine when writing advei Users 



THE IBALTIMORE AND OHIO E MPLOYE S MAGAZINE 



A 



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m 



BALL WATCHES 

OFFICIAL RAILROAD STANDARD 




The Old 18 Size Watch 




The Old Wood Burnet 



Trade In Your Old 1 8 Size Watch 

You've probably forgotten about the old wood burners — 
they're gone — out of date. You wouldn't work on a railroad 
that used them today. 

But now just stop and think a minute about something much 

closer to you than a wood burner. It rests there in your pocket. It weighs more than 
a quarter of a pound. It's nearly an inch thick. It's your old 18 size watch and 
although there's no denying the fact that it's been a good timekeeper,— it's big, un- 
handy and clumsy. You can just as well own a Twentieth Century Model Ball Watch. 

Easy Payments Too 

Your home jeweler will let you turn in the old 18 size as part pay- 
ment on a new thin model 16 size Ball Watch, and the balance can be paid under 
special monthly arrangement. 

You don't want your friends to ask — "Well,— what's the time by 

your old 'wood burner' ?"— See your Ball Watch jeweler about that trade-in today. 

Drop us a card for further information regarding time payments and trade-ins. 

The Webb C. Ball Watch Co. 

Cleveland, Ohio 




I'll <ix( mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Volume 5 



CONTENTS 

Mount Clare is Liberally Bedecked with the National Flag 4 

President Wilson's War Message, Delivered at a Joint Session 

of Congress, on April 2, 1917 5 

"An Ounce of Prevention — " 

Like Their European and English Sisters, American Women 

will do the Work of the Men Called to the Colors 

Our Employes in War Time 

Major Charles Hine, Special Representative of the President 

"Swelter in the City ? Not for Me ! " 17 

Transportation'Department Team Wins Bowling Championship 21 

President Wilson's Proclamation to the American People 

(April 15, 1917) 23 

The Heart of the Engineer — Prize'Story Mrs. Cora M. Turner 

Baltimore and Ohio Trapshooting Club Opens the Season 

of 1917 32 

War, Food and the Cost of Living W. H. Manss, Assistant 

to Vice-President In Charge of Commercial Development 33 

Statement of Pension Feature 36 

The System Base Ball League Preparing*for a Busy Season 37 

Safety First — Prize Article on Ac ident Prevention 

Clarence Feltz Dotson 39 

The Increase in the Cost of Materials 41 

Editorial 42 

The Troubles of Mr. Waybill and the Freight Family — No. 5, 

Hauling and Handling H. Irving Martin 44 

Hail ! The Faithful Track Foreman 45 

The Mikado, as Presented by The Baltimore and Ohio Opera Club. ... 49 

Special Merit 55 

Among Ourselves 59 



# 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write~on one side of the sheet only. 




Oh, say can you see, by the dawn's early light, 
What so proudly we hailed at the twilight's last 
gleaming, 

Whose broad stripes and bright stars, thru the 

perilous night 
O'er the ramparts we watched were so gallantly 

streaming? 

A nd the rockets' red glare, the bombs bursting in air, 
(Have proof thru the night that our flag was still there. 
Oh, say, docs that star spangled banner yet wave, 
Oet the land of the fire, and the home of the brave? 



On the shore dimly seen thru the mists of the deep, 
Where the foe's haughty host in dread silena 
reposes, 

What is that which the breeze o'er the towering 
steep, 

As it fitfully blows, half conceals, half discloses? 
Now it catches the gleam of the morning's first 
beam, 

In full glory reflected, now shines on the stream.' 
'Tis the star spangled banner, oh, long may it wave, 
O'er the land of the free and the home of the brave. 



MOUNT CLARE is liberally bedecked with the National flag. The Stars and Stripes 
fly from practically every building. This picture is of the flag raising over the Mount 
Clare office building- perhaps the most elaborate of all the splendid ceremonies at the 
many flag raisings. How appropriate that the men of the Baltimore and Ohio — rich in it: 
patriotic association and history — and especially in the city in which the National Anthem 
had its birth should show their colors with such unanimity and enthusiasm. 



I 



President Wilson's War Message 

Delivered at a Joint Session of Congress on 
April 2, 1917 



Gentlemen of the Congress: 

I have called the Congress into extra- 
ordinary session because there are serious, 
very serious, choices of policy to be 
made, and made immediately, which it 
was neither right nor constitutionally 
permissible that 1 should assume the 
responsibility of making. 

On the 3d of February last I officially 
laid before you the extraordinary an- 
nouncement of the Imperial German 
Government that on and after the first 
day of February it was its purpose to 
put aside all restraints of law or of 
humanity and use its submarines to sink 
every vessel that sought to approach 
either the ports of Great Britain and 
Ireland or the western coasts of Europe 
or any of the ports controlled by the 
enemies of Germany within the Mediter- 
ranean. That had seemed to be the 
object of the German submarine warfare 
earlier in the war, but since April of last 
year the Imperial Government had 
somewhat restrained the commanders 
of its undersea craft, in conformity with 
its promise, then given to us, that 
passenger boats should not be sunk and 
that due warning would be given to all 
other vessels which its submarines might 
seek to destroy, when no resistance was 
offered or escape attempted, and care 
taken that their crews were given at 
least a fair chance to save their lives in 
their open boats. The precautions taken 
were meagre and haphazard enough, as 
was proved in distressing instance after 
instance in the progress of the cruel and 
unmanly business, but a certain degree 
of restraint was observed. 



The new policy has swept every 
restriction aside. Vessels of every kind, 
whatever their flag, their character, their 
cargo, their destination, their errand, 
have been ruthlessly sent to the bottom 
without warning and without thought 
of help or mercy for those on board, the 
vessels of friendly neutrals along with 
those of belligerents. Even hospital 
ships and ships carrying relief to the 
sorely bereaved and stricken people of 
Belgium, though the latter were provided 
with safe conduct through the proscribed 
areas by the German Government itself 
and were distinguished by unmistakable 
marks of identity, have been sunk with 
the same reckless lack of compassion or 
of principle. 

I was for a little while unable to 
believe that such things would in fact 
be done by any Government that had 
hitherto subscribed to humane practices 
of civilized nations. International law 
had its origin in the attempt to set up 
some law which would be respected and 
observed upon the seas, where no nation 
has right of dominion and where lay the 
free highways of the world. By painful 
stage after stage has that law been built 
up, with meagre enough results, indeed, 
after all was accomplished that could be 
accomplished, but always with a clear 
view, at least, of what the heart and 
conscience of mankind demanded. 

This minimum of right the German 
Government has swept aside, under the 
plea of retaliation and necessity and 
because it had no weapons which it 
could use at sea except these, which it is 
impossible to employ, as it is employing 



5 



6 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



them, without throwing to the wind all 
scruples of humanity or of respect for 
the understandings that were supposed 
to underlie the intercourse of the world. 

I am not now thinking of the loss of 
property involved, immense and serious 
as that is, but only of the wanton and 
wholesale destruction of the lives of 
noncombatants, men, women and chil- 
dren, engaged in pursuits which have 
always, even in the darkest periods of 
modern history, been deemed innocent 
and legitimate. Property can be paid 
for; the lives of peaceful and innocent 
people cannot be. The present German 
submarine warfare against commerce is 
a warfare against mankind. 

It is a war against all nations. Ameri- 
can ships have been sunk, American 
lives taken, in ways which it has stirred 
us very deeply to learn of, but the ships 
and people of other neutral and friendly 
nations have been sunk and overwhelmed 
in the waters in the same way. There 
has been no discrimination. 

The challenge is to all mankind. Each 
nation must decide for itself how it will 
meet it. The choice we make for 
ourselves must be made with a modera- 
tion of counsel and a temperateness of 
judgment befitting our character and 
our motives as a nation. We must put 
excited feeling away. Our motive will 
not be revenge or the victorious assertion 
of the physical might of the nation, but 
only the vindication of right, of human 
right, of which we are only a single 
champion. 

When I addressed the Congress on the 
26th of February last I thought that it 
would suffice to assert our neutral rights 
with arms, our right to use the seas 
againsl unlawful interference, our right 
to keep our people safe against unlawful 
violence. But armed neutrality, it now 
appears, is impracticable. Because sub- 
marinee are in effeci outlaws, when used 
the German submarines have been 
used against merchant shipping, it is im- 
possible to defend ships against their 
attacks as the law of nations has assumed 
that merchantmen would defend them- 
selves against privateers or cruisers, visi- 
ble craft giving chase upon the open sea. 
It is common prudence in such circum- 



stances, grim necessity indeed, to en- 
deavor to destroy them before they have 
shown their own intention. They must 
be dealt with upon sight, if dealt with at 
all. " 

The German Government denies the 
right of neutrals to use arms at all within 
the areas of the sea which it has pro- 
scribed, even in the defense of rights 
which no modern publicist has ever 
before questioned their right to defend. 
The intimation is conveyed that the 
armed guards which we have placed on 
our merchant ships will be treated as 
beyond the pale of law and subject to be 
dealt with as pirates would be. Armed 
neutrality is ineffectual enough at best; 
in such circumstances and in the face of 
such pretentions it is worse than inef- 
fectual; it is likely only to produce what 
it was meant to prevent; it is practically 
certain to draw us into the war without 
either the rights or the effectiveness of 
belligerents. There is one choice we 
cannot make, we are incapable of making; 
we will not choose the path of submission 
and suffer the most sacred rights of our 
nation and our people to be ignored or 
violated. The wrongs against which w r e 
now array ourselves are no common 
wrongs; they cut to the very roots of 
human life. 

With a profound sense of the solemn 
and even tragical character of the step 
I am taking and of the grave responsi- 
bilities which it involves, but in unhesi- 
tating obedience to what I deem my 
constitutional duty, I advise that the 
Congress declare the recent course of the 
Imperial German Government to be in 
fact nothing less than war against the 
Government and people of the United 
States; that it formally accept the status 
of belligerent which has thus been thrust 
upon it ; and that it take immediate steps 
not only to put the country in a more 
thorough state of defense, but also to 
exert all its power and employ all its 
resources to bring the Government of 
the German Empire to terms and end 
t he war. 

What this will involve is clear. It will 
involve the utmost practicable co-opera- 
tion in counsel and action with the Gov- 
ernments now at war with Germany, and, 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



7 



as incident to that, the extention to those 
Governments of the most liberal financial 
credits, in order that our resources may 
so far as possible be added to theirs. 

It will involve the organization and 
mobilization of all the material resources 
of the country to supply the materials of 
war and serve the incidental needs of the 
nation in the most abundant and yet the 
most economical and efficient way pos- 
sible. 

It will involve the immediate full 
equipment of the navy in all respects, 
but particularly in supplying it with the 
best means of dealing with the enemy's 
submarines. 

It will involve the immediate addition 
to the armed forces of the United States, 
already provided for by law in case of 
war, of at least 500,000 men, who should, 
in my opinion, be chosen upon the prin- 
ciple of universal liability to service, and 
also the authorization of subsequent 
additional increments of equal force so 
soon as they may be needed and can be 
handled in training. 

It will involve also, of course, the 
granting of adequate credits to the Gov- 
ernment, sustained, I hope, so far as 
they can equitably be sustained by the 
present generation, by well conceived 
taxation. 

I say sustained so far as may be equit- 
able by taxation, because it seems to me 
that it would be most unwise to base the 
credits, which will now be necessary, 
entirely on money borrowed. It is our 
duty, I most respectfully urge, to protect 
our people, so far as we may, against the 
very serious hardships and evils which 
would be likely to arise out of the inflation 
which would be produced by vast loans. 

In carrying out the measures by which 
these things are to be accomplished we 
should keep constantly in mind the wis- 
dom of interfering as little as possible in 
our own preparation and in the equipment 
of our own military forces with the duty 
— for it will be a very practical duty — 
of supplying the nations already at war 
with Germany with the materials which 
they can obtain only from us or by our 
assistance. They are in the field and we 
should help them in every way to be 
effective there. 



I shall take the liberty of suggesting, 
through the several executive depart- 
ments of the Government, for the con- 
sideration of your committees, measures 
for the accomplishment of the several 
objects I have mentioned. I hope that 
it will be your pleasure to deal with them 
as having been framed after very careful 
thought by the branch of the Govern- 
ment upon whom the responsibility of 
conducting the war and safeguarding the 
nation will most directly fall. 

While we do these things, these deep- 
ly momentous things, let us be very clear, 
and make very clear to all the world, 
what our motives and our objects are. 
My own thought has not been driven 
from its habitual and normal course by 
the unhappy events of the last two 
months, and I do not believe that the 
thought of the nation had been altered 
or clouded by them. I have exactly the 
same things in mind now that I had in 
mind when I addressed the Senate on the 
22nd of January last; the same that I 
had in mind when I addressed the Con- 
gress on the 3rd of February and on the 
26th of February. Our object now, as 
then, is to vindicate the principles of 
peace and justice in the life of the world 
as against selfish and autocratic power, 
and to set up among the really free and 
self-governed peoples of the world such 
a concert of purpose and of action as 
will henceforth insure the observance of 
those principles. 

Neutrality is no longer feasible or de- 
sirable where the peace of the world is 
involved and the freedom of its peoples, 
and the menace to that peace and free- 
dom lies in the existence of autocratic 
Governments, backed by organized force 
which is controlled wholly by their will, 
not by the will of their people. We have 
seen the last of neutrality in such circum- 
stances. We are at the beginning of an 
age in which it will be insisted that the 
same standards of conduct and of re- 
sponsibility for wrong done shall be ob- 
served among nations and their Govern- 
ments that are observed among the 
individual citizens of civilized states. 

We have no quarrel with the German 
people. W r e have no feeling toward 
them but one of sympathy and friend- 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



ship. It was not upon their impulse 
that their Government acted in entering 
this war. It was not with their previous 
knowledge or approval. It was a war 
determined upon as wars used to be de- 
termined upon in the old, unhappy days, 
when peoples were nowhere consulted by 
their rulers and wars were provoked and 
waged in the interest of dynasties or of 
little groups of ambitious men who were 
accustomed to use their fellow men as 
pawns and tools. 

Self-governed nations do not fill their 
neighbor states with spies or set the 
course of intrigue to bring about some 
critical posture of affairs which will give 
them an opportunity to strike and make 
conquest. Such designs can be success- 
fully worked out only under cover and 
where no one has the right to ask ques- 
tions. Cunningly contrived plans of de- 
ception or aggression, carried, it may be, 
from generation to generation, can be 
worked out and kept from the light only 
within the privacy of courts or behind the 
carefully guarded confidences of a narrow 
and privileged class. They are happily 
impossible where public opinion com- 
mands and insists upon full information 
concerning all the nation's affairs. 

A steadfast concert for peace can never 
be maintained except by a partnership 
of democratic nations. No autocratic 
Government could be trusted to keep 
faith within it or observe its convenants. 
It must be a league of honor, a partner- 
ship of opinion. Intrigue would eat its 
vitals away; the plottings of inner circles 
who could plan what they would and 
render account to no one would be a 
corrupt ion seated at its very heart. Only 
free peoples can hold their purpose and 
their honor steady to a common end and 
prefer the interests of mankind to any 
narrow interest of their own. 

Does not every American feel that 
assurance has been added to our hope 
for the future pence of the world by the 
wonderful and heartening things that 
have been happening within the last few 
weeks in Russia? Russia was known 
by those who knew it besl to have been 
always in fact democratic at heart in all 
the vital habits of her thought, in all the 
intimate relationships of her people that 



spoke their natural instinct, their habit- 
ual attitude toward' life. The autocracy 
that crowned the summit of her political 
structure, long as it had stood and terrible 
as was the reality of its power, was not 
in fact Russian in origin, character, or 
purpose; and now it has been shaken off 
and the great, generous Russian people 
have been added, in all their naive majes- 
ty and might, to the forces that are fight- 
ing for freedom in the world, for justice, 
and for peace. Here is a fit partner for 
a League of Honor. 

One of the things that has served to con- 
vince us that the Prussian autocracy was 
not and could never be our friend is that 
from the very outset of the present war 
it has filled our unsuspecting communities, 
and even our offices of government, with 
spies and set criminal intrigues every- 
where afoot agains* our national unity 
of counsel, our peace within and without, 
our industries and our commerce. In- 
deed, it is now evident that its spies were 
here even before the war began; and it is 
unhappily not a matter of conjecture, 
but a fact proved in our courts of justice, 
that the intrigues, which have more than 
once come perilously near to disturbing 
the peace and dislocating the industries 
of the country, have been carried on at 
the instigation, with the support, and 
even under the personal direction of 
official agents of the Imperial Govern- 
ment, accredited to the Government of 
the United States. 

Even in checking these things and 
trying to extirpate them we have sought 
to put the most generous interpretation 
possible upon them because we knew 
that their source lay, not in any hostile 
feeling or purpose of the German people 
toward us, (who were, no doubt, as ignor- 
ant of them as we ourselves were,) but 
only in the selfish designs of the Govern- 
ment that did what it pleased and told 
its people nothing. But they have 
played their part in serving to convince 
us at last that that Government enter- 
tains no real friendship for us, and means 
to act against our peace and security at 
its convenience. That it means to stir 
up enemies against us at our very doors 
the intercepted note to the Germ in Minis- 
ter at Mexico City is eloquent evidence. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



We are accepting this challenge of 
hostile purpose because we know that in 
such a Government, following such 
methods, we can never have a friend; 
and that in the presence of its organized 
power, always lying in wait to accomplish 
we know not what purpose, can be no 
assured security for the democratic 
Governments of the world. We are now 
about to accept the gauge of battle 
with this natural foe to liberty and shall, 
if necessary, spend the whole force of 
the nation to check and nullify its 
pretensions and its power. We are glad, 
now that we see the facts with no veil 
of false pretense about them, to fight 
thus for the ultimate peace of the world 
and for the liberation of its peoples, the 
German peoples included; for the rights 
of nations, great and small, and the 
privilege of men everywhere to choose 
their way of life and of obedience. 

The world must be made safe for 
democracy. Its peace must be planted 
upon the tested foundations of political 
liberty. We have no selfish ends to 
serve. We desire no conquest, no domin- 
ion. We seek no indemnities for our- 
selves, no material compensation for the 
sacrifices we shall freely make. We are 
but one of the champions of the rights of 
mankind. We shall be satisfied when 
those rights have been made as secure 
as the faith and the freedom of nations 
can make them. 

Just because we fight without rancor 
and without selfish object, seeking 
nothing for ourselves but what we shall 
wish to share with all free peoples, we 
shall I feel confident, conduct our 
operations as belligerents without passion 
and ourselves observe with proud 
punctilio the principles of right and of 
fair play we profess to be fighting for. 

I have said nothing of the Govern- 
ments allied with the Imperial Govern- 
ment of Germany because they have not 
made war upon us or challenged us to 
defend our right and our honor. The 
Austro-Hungarian Government has, in- 
deed, avowed its unqualified indorsement 
and acceptance of the reckless and 
lawless submarine warfare, adopted now 
without disguise by the Imperial German 
Government, and it has therefore not 



been possible for this Government to 
receive Count Tarnowski, the Ambas- 
sador recently accredited to this Govern- 
ment by the Imperial and Royal Govern- 
ment of Austria-Hungary; but that 
Government has not actually engaged 
in warfare against citizens of the United 
States on the seas, and I take the liberty, 
fcr the present at least, of postponing a 
discussion of our relations with the 
authorities at Vienna. We enter this 
war only where we are clearly forced 
into it because there are no other means 
of defending our right. 

It will be all the easier for us to 
conduct ourselves as belligerents in a 
high spirit of right and fairness because 
we act without animus, not with enmity 
toward a people or with the desire to 
bring any injury or disadvantage upon 
them, but only in armed opposition to 
an irresponsible Government which 
has thrown aside all considerations of 
humanity and of right and is running 
amuck. 

We are, let me say again, the sincere 
friends of the German people, and shall 
desire nothing so much as the early 
re-establishment of intimate relations of 
mutual advantage between us, however 
hard it may be for them for the time 
being to believe that this is spoken from 
our hearts. We have borne with their 
present Government through all these 
bitter months because of that friend- 
ship, exercising a patience and for- 
bearance which would otherwise have 
been impossible. 

We shall happily still have an oppor- 
tunity to prove that friendship in our 
daily attitude and actions toward the 
millions of men and women of German 
birth and native sympathy who live 
among us and share our life, and we shall 
be proud to prove it toward all who are 
in fact loyal to their neighbors and to 
the Government in the hour of test. 
They are most of them as true and loyal 
Americans as if they had never known 
any other fealty or allegiance. They 
will be prompt to stand with us in 
rebuking and restraining the few who 
may be of a different mind and purpose. 
If there should be disloyalty, it will be 
dealt with with a firm hand of stern 



10 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



repression; but, if it lifts its head at all, 
it will lift it only here and there and 
without countenance except from a 
lawless and malignant few. 

It is a distressing and oppressive duty, 
gentlemen of the Congress, which I have 
performed in thus addressing you. There 
are, it may be, many months of fiery 
trial and sacrifice ahead of us. It is a 
fearful thing to lead this great, peaceful 
people into war, into the most terrible 
and disastrous of all wars, civilization 
itself seeming to be in the balance. 

But the right is more precious than 
peace, and we shall fight for the things 
which we have always carried nearest 
our hearts — for democracy, for the right 



of those who submit to authority to have 
a voice in their own Governments, for 
the rights and liberties of small nations, 
for a universal dominion of right by such 
a concert of free peoples as shall bring 
peace and safety to all nations and make 
the world itself at last free. 

To such a task we can dedicate our 
lives and our fortunes, everything that 
we are and everything that we have, 
with the pride of those who know that 
the da}' has come when America is 
privileged to spend her blood and her 
might for the principles that gave her 
birth and happiness and the peace which 
she has treasured. 

God helping her, she can do no other. 



„ , in* . „ . — . w 

— - — — »— — « — ■ . — — . ■ 14 



"An Ounce of Prevention 



PERHAPS the most important train movement, in point of public interest, made in 
the last fifty years over the Baltimore and Ohio was that of the special train carrying 
the French Mission, M. Viviani, Minister of Justice; General Joffre, Marshal of 
France, and their distinguished associates, who are now in this country as the 
representatives of France and as the guests of the United States. The special left 
Washington on the afternoon of May 3, for Chicago, arriving there the following day. 

Ever since their arrival in this country the interest of the Nation has been centered 
on our distinguished guests. Everywhere they have gone they have received from the 
public a welcome which for spontaneous enthusiasm has seldom been equalled. They 
have also been almost overwhelmed by more formal tributes, such as public receptions, 
honorary degrees, and gifts, and generally made to feel that they were welcome not only 
because they were the representatives of our sister Republic across the sea, but for 
themselves and for the services which they have rendered to the common cause of 
democracy. 

It was undoubtedly with this feeling of respect, honor and affection that a large 
crowd of citizens gathered at our Gary, Indiana, station to greet the Nation's guests on 
the morning of May 4. The crowd was enthusiastic and, like most enthusiastic crowds, 
not over mindful of its safety. A moment after the train stopped both tracks were 
covered with people anxious to catch a glimpse of the Hero of the Marne and of his fellow 
countrymen. 

Among the Baltimore and Ohio officials on the train was C. W. Galloway, vice- 
president and general manager. With the foresight and sound judgment that marks 
the efficient railroader he saw the danger to the crowd on the eastbound track, and 
promptly sent out a flagman to protect it. This, to some, may seem a small thing — but 
in times of excitement and enthusiasm small things are sometimes overlooked and lead 
to terrible accidents. The eyes of the country were upon this special movement and it 
is a matter of pride to every Baltimore and Ohio man that one of our officials took the 
greatest pains to see that the possibility of any unpleasant incident was eliminated. If 
Mr. Galloway had not taken this precaution and a train had crashed into the crowd of 
patriotic people gathered to do honor to the Nation's guests it would have been a matter 
of unforgetable sorrow to every loyal Baltimore and Ohio employe. 

It is suggested that this incident be mentioned at Safety Rallies and other em- 
ploy-.' meetings, as an illustration of the old adage that "An ounce of prevention is 
vorth a pound cf cure". 



Like Their European and English Sisters, 
American Women Will do the Work 
of the Men Called to the Colors 



r r\ lOR some time railroad officials, in 
[ JP J common with the men at the 

heads of the other great industries 
of the Nation, have realized that 
some drastic action would have to be 
taken to overcome the increasing shortage 
of labor in industrial sections of the coun- 
try during "war times." They may have 
considered the idea of employing women 
in some kinds of work which have always 
been considered man's particular prov- 
ince, but, at any rate on the railroads, it 



was not until it became certain that 
America would enter the Great War that 
they were employed to any large extent. 

In Europe the employment of women 
to take men's places started in the first 
days of the war. Even before the first 
Uhlan trotted across the Belgian border 
the call to arms had rung out over the 
countries that were soon to be in the 
death grapple and every able bodied 
man had been transformed into a soldier. 
American visitors in Paris in the early 




SOME OF THE "FIRST HUNDRED" WOMEN ENLISTED UNDER THE BANNER OF 
THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
They work in our Lorain Shops and do lots of things that women don't usually do— sort material, clean up around the 
shop, and one — the lady in the felt hat — runs a drill press anrl also works as a blacksmith's helper. And as for the 
overalls— what girl wouldn't like to be a woman railroader? 



11 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



days of August, 1914, will remember the 
sudden and almost complete disappear- 
ance of shop-clerks, waiters, buss drivers 
and traction employes. But after a few 
days women began to take the places of 
their husbands and brothers. As the 
drain upon the man power of the battling 
nations has become heavier and heavier 
women have more and more taken the 
places and done the work of the male 
workers. 

In England, where the small profes- 
sional army was, like our own Regulars, 
entirely divorced from the industrial life 
of the nation, the change was slower. 
England started to fight the war on the 
principle of "Business as usual." But 
England's army was but a mouthful for 
the great German war monster — although 
a mouthful that the monster had some 
little trouble in digesting — and as call 
after call came for volunteers the in- 
dustries felt the drain and had to begin 
replacing workmen by workwomen. 
The part that women have played in 
England's struggle is told of in the follow- 
ing article from the London Chronicle: 

WOMEN SAVED ENGLAND 
But for Their Work Germany Would 
Have Won War by Now 

The great part that women's labor — skilled 
and unskilled — is taking in the machinery of 





'/ huloqra ph from ( / ndi r u nod and (' rider wood, N. Y.) 

A \ ENGLISH WORKWOMAN WHO PERFORMS 
DELICATE MECHANICAL WORK FOR 
AN ENGLISH RAILWAY 



WOMEN CAR CLEANERS AT WORK IN 
CAMDEN STATION, BALTIMORE 

war is strikingly told in the Ministry of Muni- 
tions pictures now on view at the Royal Colo- 
nial Institute. These pictures, all photographs 
taken in the factories, depots, shipyards and 
so forth, show many thousands of women at 
work of a kind hitherto done exclusively by 
men. 

There are more than 500 snapshots, the 
sections embracing aircraft construction, engi- 
neering, foundry work, shipbuilding,, small 
arms, big gun work, explosives, shells, optical 
and electrical work, wire and rolling mills and 
general laboring. 

Many of the photographs show women oper- 
ating huge pieces of machinery, working on 
8-inch howitzers, locomotive parts, riveting 
ships' plates, handling T. N. T., assembling 
periscopes, and doing a hundred and one equal- 
ly arduous and important jobs. 

"But for the work women have done in the 
munition shops, the Germans would have won 
the war by now," said Mr. Kellaway, M. P. 
parliamentary secretary to the Ministry of 
Munitions, in opening the exhibition. 

The British woman is quite as active 
in various branches of industry not men- 
tioned in the "Chronicle's" article. Last 
month we published some interesting 
pictures of the work they arc doing on 
English railroads. The Englishwoman 
feels that the be§1 service 1 that she can 
lender her country is to release a man 
for service at the front. 

America is now in the war to the hilt. 
Selective conscription has been approved 
l»\ i he Congress and the people and will 
be ;i fad within a few months. Il is 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



L3 



probable that many railroaders not en- 
gaged in actual operation will have the 
privilege of serving their country on the 
firing line. Others will have to stay at 
home to help keep a steady stream of 
munitions and supplies flowing to our 
troops and the troops and peoples of our 
Allies, as well as to carry on the usual 
business of the country. But labor to 
take the places of those called to the colors 
must be obtained and it is to the women 
of America that we must look for this 
service. The field is almost unlimited. 
In shop and factory, on the railroads 
and traction lines, in munition works 
and — above all — on the farms of the 
United States the American woman must 
show that, in her willingness to make 
great sacrifices for a great cause, she is 
at least the equal of her sisters in foreign 
lands. 

Our railroad has already started to 
employ women. So far most of them 
have been assigned to clerical positions, but 
some, like those in two of the accompany- 
ing pictures, are doing other work. As the 
demand for men becomes heavier more 
and more women will have to be em- 




MISS GRACE VAUGHN 
Our woman station agent at Vaughn, on the Cleveland Divi- 
sion. In addition to her railroad duties Miss Vaughn serves 
Uncle Sam as postmistress 



ployed. The "first hundred" were en- 
listed under the banner of the Baltimore 
and Ohio during the week ending May 5. 

Although the employment of women 
in some branches of industry has not 
been general there have been enough 
exceptions to prove that they are capable 
workers in almost any trade. For more 
than ten years women have been em- 
ployed as ''foundrymen" in one of the 
biggest industrial plants in the Newark, 
Ohio, district, and all the anvils used on 
Uncle Sam's men-o-war are made by a 
woman. 

Instructions have been issued to all 
employing officers to exercise the greatest 
care that the girls and women employed 
are not mere novelty seekers, but those 
who sincerely and earnestly desire to do 
their part in the great struggle for de- 
mocracy and to earn their own living. 
Everything possible will be done for the 
comfort and convenience of these new 
workers. 

The Republic 

Thou, too, sail on, Ship of State! 

Sail on, Union, strong and great! 

Humanity with all its fears, 

With all its hopes of future years, 

Is hanging breathless on thy fate! 

We know what Master laid thy keel, 

What workmen wrought thy ribs of steel, 

Who made each mast, and sail, and rope, 

What anvils rang, what hammers beat, 

In what a forge and what a heat 

Were shaped the anchors of thy hope! 

Fear not each sudden sound and shock, 

'Tis of the wave and not the rock; 

'Tis but the flapping of the sail, 

And not a rent made by the gale! 

In spite of rock and tempest's roar, 

In spite of false lights on the shore, 

Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea! 

Our hearts, our hopes are all wich thee 

Our faith triumphant o'er our fears, 

Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears 

Are all with thee — are all with thee! 

Henry Wadsworth Longfellow 



□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□ 



GAIN the employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 



welcome the opportunity to serve the cause of liberty. As 



in 1846, in 1861, and in 1898 the United States Army and 
Navy, including the Marine Corps; the National Guard, and the 
newly created additional forces, call for railway transportation to 
play its valuable part in mobilizing the forces, and in handling equip- 
ment, munitions and supplies. The technical military term for such 
part of the operations is "logistics." "Strategy" plans the war 
and determines upon its larger objectives. "Tactics," the handling 
of troops to carry out the strategy, include "drill" which trains the 
forces in discipline and the orderly execution of movements. 

This time the railways are a relatively larger element of success 
in war than ever before. That every employe will do his or her bit 
and do it well is a foregone conclusion. Some, however, will do 
this bit better than others. The most helpful will be those who can 
the furthest forget all thought of self-comfort and ease. The few 
employes so foolish as to consider themselves martyrs and to growl 
because war conditions have changed their particular kind of work 
are, without realizing it, really unpatriotic, no matter how much 
they may shout for the flag and abuse the common enemy. The 
stern school of war conditions roots out selfishness to make room for 
true patriotism. 

The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad has a personnel of officials 
and employes second to no similar body in the world. For the most 
part the working forces find themselves at familiar tasks in accus- 
tomed places. Not so with the military forces. Our little Army 
and Navy arc being suddenly expanded and are necessarily filled 
with officers and men a large percentage of whom are still green at 
their new jobs. In the shake down of active service and in the 




Special Representative of the President 



Our Employes 
in War Time 



By Major Charles Hine 




□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□: 

14 



£3=1 



□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□ 



merciless school of war they will measure their capabilities and 
become more efficient every day. 

Suppose that the Baltimore and Ohio woke up some morning 
to find that its 4,500 miles had increased tenfold, or to 45,000 miles, 
over night; that it had to recruit officials and employes for this 
additional mileage at once; that green track laborers had to be 
promoted to section foremen; that shop apprentices became general 
foremen in a week; that a fireman bucking the extra board found 
himself running a passenger engine; that a brakeman a few weeks in 
service was signing orders as a conductor; that a student switchman 
became a yardmaster; that a green operator had to work as a train 
dispatcher. Of course, out of the 60,000 employes and those from 
other roads, there would soon be found capable men for officials, 
sub -officials, foremen, conductors, engineers, etc., who in turn would 
educate the newer and younger employes. But could they be ex- 
pected, right away, to do as good a job of railroading as the present 
highly trained personnel? The point of all this is that the Balti- 
more and Ohio will be expected to do relatively better work than the 
military forces it is so suddenly called upon to serve. Therefore 
both officials and employes must cultivate patience and vigilance 
and then more patience and more vigilance. Some very foolish 
orders will be given by green military officers. Some annoying 
mistakes will be made in the routing and billing of freight and sup- 
plies. The officials and employes on the spot who can catch these 
mistakes and with tact and good sense help straighten out the 
difficulty will render the best service of all. The man who pleads 
in excuse, "Nobody told me about that," or "We never have done 
things that way," or "I never heard of such a case," is confessing 
that he is more of a machine than a man; that he really needs some- 
body else present to think for him every time something new comes up. 

The above suggestions from a fellow employe are given in a 
helpful rather than a faultfinding spirit. The standard of intelligence 
among railroad employes was never higher than this war finds it. 
The response to most demands made will be intelligent and efficient. 
Human nature is mighty good stuff and always, under normal con- 
ditions, has a little reserve of effort and resourcefulness which is 
brought out and developed by the abnormal condition of war. 

Safety first should always carry signals for common sense second. 



:□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□ 

15 




16 



"Swelter in the City? Not for Me!" 



Says the Man who has Tasted the Delights of 
Camping on the Maryland State Reserves 



ONDUCTOR SMITH, his run fin- 
ished, made his way to the train- 
master's office. There, after 
making his report, he drifted into 
casual conversation with the chief clerk. 

"Feels like spring today, captain," re- 
marked that gentleman. "I'll bet you had 
that old fishing rod of your's out last 
night." 

"Well," admitted the conductor, "I 
did just look her over to see that she was 
all right. Say, where do you spend your 
vacations?" 

"Oh, I generally take the wife and kids 
to the seashore," replied the chief clerk. 

Conductor Smith sniffed contempt- 
uously. 

"And live in a stuffy bed room, and 
change your clothes three times a day 
and have a lot of old maids looking dag- 
gers at you everytime you take a whiff 
out of the old briar. Not for me! Why 
don't you try the simple life — go camp- 
ing?" 

The chief clerk shook his head decid- 
edly. 

"The only trouble about the simple 
life is that it is too complicated — par- 
ticularly for a poor man. By the time 
you have bought a camping outfit, and 
clothes, and fishing tackle, and guns — 
anyhow, you have to spend half your 
vacation getting to a decent place to 
camp." 

"Not on your life!" almost shouted the 
conductor. "Not if you live in Maryland. 
And you don't have to buy everything 
listed in a three hundred page sporting 
goods catalogue to have a good time. 



5$f 



Clothes — why, man, all you need is a pair 
of khaki trousers, a sweater, an old hat 
and a pair of old shoes. And say, I know 
a place to camp that is a place — right 
near the city, too. You can live there 
all summer, spend every night in the cool, 
fresh country air and never lose a day 
from your work — why, lots of people travel 
back and forth on my train every day." 

"Well, I suppose it's all right for a 
batchelor, but I'm a married man, with 
children," objected the chief clerk. "You 
can't take women and children camping." 

"You can't, hey!" laughed conductor 
Smith. "I'll tell you one thing; if I 
should go home and tell the missus and 
the kids that we weren't going camping 
this summer — well, I'd want to switch to 
a run that had long lay-overs away from 
home." 

The chief clerk didn't answer for 
awhile. His eyes had a faraway look. 
His mind had gone back more years than 
he liked to count and he was seeing vi- 
sions. One was especially clear — a trout 
brook running through the woods, mossy 
black rocks showing through the tumbling 
white water, and on the bank a bare- 
footed boy, a tomato can of worms by his 
side and a homemade "fish pole" in his 
hand. In that instant he was converted. 
From then on he was a member of the 
brotherhood of the great outdoors. 

"Tell me about it — how do you work 
it?" he asked eagerly. 

"You go to the ticket office and get a 
folder called 'State Reserves of Mary- 
land,' issued by the Company. And be 
sure to read the 'Don' ts' on the last page 




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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




SHIVERING OVER GHOST STORIES IS GOOD FUN- 
PROVIDED THAT YOU SHIVER IN COMPANY 
BEFORE A BLAZING CAMP FIRE 

— part of that Reserve belongs to me — 
and to you — and we want it kept in good 
order." 

The chief clerk did as conductor Smith 
suggested and got a copy of the folder. 
This, briefly, is what he learned from it. 

Until 1912 the country along the banks 
of the Patapsco River, from Hollofield to 
Relay, was just a beautiful bit of country 
— the winding river running between 
high, heavily timbered sloping banks. 
Then, through enactment of the Legis- 
lature, the Patapsco Reserve was created. 
Some of the land forming the Reserve 
was given to the State, but the greater 
part was secured by purchase. Trails 
were opened, fire lines laid out and other 
improvements made as their desirability 
became evident. Last year 
about 200 camp sites were defi- 
nitely located for the free use of 
visitors who desired to use the 
Reserve for camping. The peo- 
ple who first came were de- 
lighted. The camp sites were 
beautifully located, their water 
was that clear liquid that comes 
only from rustic springs and for 
amusements they had fishing, 
swimming and canoeing. These 
pioneers got so much healthful 
pleasure; from the Reserve that 
the Board decided that its use 
for camping should be extended, 
and have made plans for that 
extension. 

Frequent train service on the ' 
Old Main Line brings any part 
of the Reserve within a half 



hour's ride of Baltimore, and it is not so 
very much further from Washington — 
and railroad fare is one of the things 
that railroaders don't have to worry 
about. 

In the folder issued by our Company (in 
cooperation with Mr. F. W. Besley, State 
Forester) there is printed an article by 
Mr. J. Gordon Dorrance which gives de- 
tailed information about the State Re- 
serves (there are two others in Garrett 
County, in the Allegheny Mountains, 
which may be used in the same way as 
the Patapsco Reserve). He gives some 
interesting and valuable hints on such 
subjects as cooking, the obtaining of sup- 
plies, and like matters of moment to the 
camper. 

Your camp may be temporary, semi- 
permanent or permanent. A canvas 
"lean-to" or a shelter tent will give pro- 
tection for a day or so, particularly if 
the party is made up of men. For a stay 
of two or three weeks or longer a larger 
tent and more elaborate cooking arrange- 
ments, camp furniture, etc., will be 
needed. But best of all, the Board will 
issue you a permit allowing you to con- 
struct a portable cabin and to occupy 
the camp site of your selection for a 
term of years — after which the permit 
may be renewed. This means that 
you may have a country home at 
very small expense. 




VOl CAN HAVE A SUMMER HOME LIKE THIS 
AT SMALL COST 



THE BALTIMOREJAND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



19 



JUST THINK OF IT— THIS CAMP IS ONLY 23 MINUTES FROM CAMDEN STATION 



For information in addition to that con- 
tained in the folder before mentioned, ad- 
dress Mr. F. W. Besley, Board of Forestry, 



Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 
or John Peddicord, Oella, Maryland, the 
Board's resident representative. 



1+ 



Judge Gary on Loyalty 

JUDGE E. H. GARY put a proposition to me that was wonderful. We 
were talking about Loyalty in business and he turned to me and said, 
"Do you know what Loyalty is? Have you ever analyzed it? I have. 
I'm a great stickler for Loyalty and I have my own notions about it. 
Loyalty means a great deal more than simply 'not betray.' More than 
acquiescence. Such things are negative; Loyalty is a positive virtue. It 
is more than personal also. Loyalty accepts the big idea whatever it is 
and accepts it whole-heartedly, once the thing is decided on. Loyalty 
means full accord with the plan — absolute harmony with the purposes and 
projects of the house. In short Loyalty is like playing a violin: you've 
got to get in tune before you can play." 

—JOE MITCHELL CHAPPLE 



cf 

11 
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I*. 



Transportation Department Team Wins 
Bowling League Championship and the 
First Leg on the Davis Bowling Cup 



HE bowling (duck pin) champion- 
ship of the Baltimore and Ohio 
System was decided on the Plaza 
Bowling Alleys, Baltimore, on the 
afternoon of Saturday, April 21. The 
team representing the Transportation 
Department defeated the team represent- 
ing the Fuel Department by forty-three 
pins, the total scores for the three games 
of the final series being: Transportation 



Department 1453 : Fuel Department, 1410. 
The score follows: 



Transportation Department 





97 


105 


110 




86 


107 


87 


Burk 


95 


79 


95 


Dienhart 


96 


98 


98 




106 


93 


101 




480 


482 


491 


Total 






1453 





THE TRANSPORTATION DEPARTMENT BOWLING TEAM, WINNERS OF THE 
1916-1917 CHAMPIONSHIP 



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22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of town and the presentation was made 
by John T. Broderick, supervisor of 
special bureaus. The handsome Davis 
Championship Cup went to the Trans- 
portation Department team and a medal 
emblematic of the individual champion- 
ship, went to R. D. Guerke, of the Trans- 
portation Department, who had the high 
individual average for the season. 

This final series came as a climax to a 
successful season and it is expected that 
next year's competition will be even 
more successful and attract a larger 
entry list. 

The League result for the last twelve 
contests follows: 

Games ^p^s*' Average 

Transportation Depart- 
ment 36 16976 471.55 

Fuel Department 36 16906 469.61 

Relief Department.... 36 16520 458.88 

Tax Department...... 36 16480 457.77 

Division Accounting 

Department 36 16434 456.50 

Paymaster's Depart- 
ment 36 16359 454.41 

Individual score results : 

Games T p™£ Average 

Brannock 30 3035 101.16 

Guerke 36 3597 99.91 



MEDAL EMBLEMATIC OF THE INDIVIDUAL 
BOWLING CHAMPIONSHIP 





Fuel Department 






Dyson 


88 


92 


94 


Whelan . . 


100 


108 


80 




103 


86 


100 




90 


83 


91 




93 


103 


99 




474 


472 


464 


Total 






1410 



After the; scries had been rolled the 
bowlers went to the roof of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Building, where the prizes were 
presented. Vice-president Davis, the 
donor of i he trophies, had been called out 



E. J. Brennan Appointed General 
Master Mechanic of Penn- 
sylvania District 

|FFECTIVE May 1 E. J. Brennan 
was appointed general master 
mechanic of the Pennsylvania 
District, with headquarters at 
Pittsburgh. He takes the place of G. A. 
Schmoll, who is on leave of absence 
because of illness. Effective the same 
date R. B. Stout was appointed super- 
intendent of shops, with headquarters at 
Glenwood, vice Mr. Brennan. F. P. 
Pf abler was appointed master mechanic 
of the Cumberland Division, with head- 
quarters at Cumberland, vice Mr. Stout, 
and A. L. Brown was made master 
mechanic of the Pittsburgh Division 
with headquarters at Glenwood, to fill 
Mr. Pfahier's position. 



President Wilson's Proclamation to the 
American People 



(Reprinted in Line with the President's Desire that this 
Address be Given the Widest Publicity) 



Washington, D. C, April 15, 1917. 
My Fellow Countrymen: 

The entrance of our own beloved 
country into the grim and terrible war 
for democracy and human rights which 
has shaken the world creates so many 
problems of national life and action which 
call for immediate consideration and 
settlement that I hope you will permit 
me to address to you a few words of 
earnest counsel and appeal with regard 
to them. 

We are rapidly putting our navy upon 
an effective war footing and are about to 
create and equip a great army, but these 
are the simplest parts of the great task 
to which we have addressed ourselves. 
There is not a single selfish element, so 
far as I can see, in the cause we are fight- 
ing for. We are fighting for what we 
believe and wish to be the rights of man- 
kind and for the future peace and security 
of the world. To do this great thing 
worthily and successfully we must devote 
ourselves to the service without regard 
to profit or material advantage and with 
an energy and intelligence that will rise 
to the level of the enterprise itself. We 
must realize to the full how great the 
task is and how many things, how many 
kinds and elements of capacity and ser- 
vice and self-sacrifice it involves. 

These, then, are the things we must do 
and do well, besides fighting — the things 
without which mere fighting would be 
fruitless. 

We must supply abundant food for 
ourselves and for our armies and our 



seamen not only; but also, for a large part 
of the nations with whom we have now 
made common cause, in whose support 
and by whose sides we shall be fighting. 

We must supply ships by the hundreds 
out of our shipyards to carry to the other 
side of the sea, submarines or no sub- 
marines, what will every day be needed 
there and abundant materials out of our 
fields and our mines and our factories 
with which not only to clothe and equip 
our own forces on land and sea but also 
to clothe and support our people for 
whom the gallant fellows under arms can 
no longer work; to help clothe and equip 
the armies with which we are cooperating 
in Europe and to keep the looms and 
manufactories there in raw materials; 
coal to keep the fires going in ships at sea 
and in the furnaces of hundreds of 
factories across the sea; steel out of which 
to make arms and ammunition both here 
and there; rails for worn out railways 
back of the fighting fronts; locomotives 
and rolling stock to take the place of 
those every day going to pieces; mules, 
horses, cattle for labor and for military 
service; every thing with which the 
people of England and France and Italy 
and Russia have usually supplied them- 
selves but can not now afford the men, 
the materials or the machinery to make. 

It is evident to every thinking man 
that our industries, on the farms, in the 
shipyards, in the mines, in the factories, 
must be made more prolific and more 
efficient than ever and that they must 
be more economically managed and better 
adapted to the particular requirements 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of our task than they have been: and 
what I want to say is that the men and 
the women who devote their thought 
and their energy to these things will be 
serving the country and conducting the 
fight for peace and freedom just as truly 
and just as effectively as the men on the 
battlefield or in the trenches. 

The industrial forces of the country, 
men and women alike, will be a great 
national, a great international service 
army— a notable and honored host en- 
gaged in the service of the nation and the 
world, the efficient friends and saviors 
of free men everywhere. Thousands, 
nay, hundreds of thousands of men other- 
wise liable to military service will, of 
right and of necessity, be excused from 
that service and assigned to the funda- 
mental sustaining work of the fields and 
factories and mines, and they will be as 
much part of the great patriotic forces 
of the nation as the men under fire. 

I take the liberty, therefore, of address- 
ing this word to the farmers of the coun- 
try and to all who work on the farms. 
The supreme need of our own nation and 
for the nations with which we are co- 
operating is an abundance of supplies 
and especially of foodstuffs. 

The importance of an adequate food 
supply, especially for the present year, is 
superlative. Without abundant food, 
alike for the armies and the peoples now 
at war, the whole great enterprise upon 
which we have embarked will break down 
and fail. The world's food reserves are 
low. Not only during the present emer- 
gency but for some time after peace shall 
have come both our own people and a 
large proportion of the people of Europe 
must rely upon the harvests in America. 

Upon the farmers of this country, 
therefore, in large measure rests the fate 
of the war and the fate of the nations. 
May the nation not count upon them to 
emit no step that will increase the pro- 
duction of their land or that will bring 
about the most effectual cooperation in the 
sale and distribution of their products? 

The time is short. It is of the most 
imperative importance that everything 
possible he done and done immediately 
to make sure of large harvests. I call 
upon young men and old alike arid upon 



the able-bodied boys of the land to accept 
and act upon this duty — to turn in hosts 
to the farms and make certain that no 
pains and labor is lacking in this great 
matter. 

I particularly appeal to the farmers of 
the South to plant abundant foodstuffs 
as well as cotton. They can show their 
patriotism in no better or more con- 
vincing way than by resisting the great 
temptation of the present price of cotton 
and helping, helping upon a great scale, 
to feed the nation and the peoples every- 
where who are fighting for their liberties 
and for our own. The variety of their 
crops will be the visible measure of their 
comprehension of their national duty. 

The Government of the United States 
and the Governments of the several 
States stand ready to cooperate. They 
will do everything possible to assist 
farmers in securing an adequate supply 
of seed, an adequate force of laborers 
when they are most needed at harvest 
time, and the means of expediting ship- 
ments of fertilizers and farm machinery, 
as well as of the crops themselves when 
harvested. 

The course of trade shall be as unham- 
pered as it is possible to make it and 
there shall be no unwarranted manipu- 
lation of the nation's food supply by 
those who handle it on its way to the 
customer. This is our opportunity to 
demonstrate the efficiency of a great 
democracy and we shall not fall short 
of it. 

This, let me say to the middlemen of 
every sort, whether they are handling 
our foodstuffs or our raw materials of 
manufacture or the products of our mills 
and factories. The eyes of the country 
will be especially upon you. This is your 
opportunity for signal service, efficient 
and disinterested. The country expects 
you, as it expects all others, to forego 
unusual profits, to organize and expedite 
shipments of supplies of every kind, but 
especially of food, with an eye to the 
service you are rendering and in the spirit 
of those who enlist in the ranks for their 
people, not for themselves. I shall con- 
fidently expect you to deserve and win 
the confidence of people of every sort 
and station. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



■2o 



To the men who run the railways of 
the country, whether they be managers 
or operative employes, let me say that 
the railways are the arteries of the 
nation's life and that upon them rests the 
immense responsibility of seeing to it 
that these arteries suffer no obstruction 
of any kind, no inefficiency or slackened 
power. 

To the merchant let me suggest the 
motto: " Small profits and quick ser- 
vice;" and to the shipbuilder the thought 
that the life of the war depends upon 
him. 

The food and the war supplies must be 
carried across the seas no matter how 
many ships are sent to the bottom. The 
places of those that go down must be 
supplied and supplied at once. 

To the miner let me say that he stands 
where the farmer does: the work of the 
world waits on him. If he slackens or 
fails, armies and statesmen are helpless. 
He also is enlisted in the great service 
army. 

The manufacturer does not need to be 
told, I hope, that the nation looks to him 
to speed and perfect every process; and 
I want only to remind his employes that 
their service is absolutely indispensable 
and is counted on by every man who 
loves the country and its liberties. 

Let me suggest also that every one who 
creates or cultivates a garden helps and 
helps greatly to solve the problem of the 



feeding of the nations and that every 
housewife who practices strict economy 
puts herself in the ranks of those who 
serve the nation. 

This is the time for America to correct 
her unpardonable fault of wastefulness 
and extravagance. 

Let every man and every woman 
assume the duty of careful, provident use 
and expenditure as a public duty, as a 
dictate of patriotism which no one can 
now expect ever to be excused or for- 
given for ignoring. 

In the hope that this statement of the 
needs of the nation and of the world in 
this hour of supreme crisis may stimulate 
those to whom it comes and remind all 
who need reminder of the solemn duties 
of a time such as the world has never seen 
before, I beg that all editors and pub- 
lishers everywhere will give as prominent 
publication and as wide circulation as 
possible to this appeal. I venture to 
suggest, also, to all advertising agencies 
that they would perhaps render a very 
substantial and timely service to the 
country if they would give it widespread 
repetition, and I hope that clergymen 
will not think the theme of it an unworthy 
or inappropriate subject of comment and 
homily from their pulpits. 

The supreme test of the nation has 
come. We must all speak, act and serve 
together. 

Woodrow Wilson. 



* . + 

I I 

Will You Help Find This Boy? 

HARRY E. TISDALE, 14 years old, left home on the evening of April 21, and was last I 

seen on a freight train northbound from Nashville, Tenn. , in company with two hoboes. ( 

He is supposed to have been bound for the harvest fields of the north or northwest and ( 

/ probably passed through Louisville, Cincinnati, Evansville, St. Louis, Kansas City or Chicago. jf 

I The boy is 5' 4" tall, weighs about 125 pounds, has blue eyes and light brown hair, jf 

I which grows low in front of the ears. When he left home he wore a white shirt, with colored 1 

j stripes and attached collar, a brown mixture worsted coat, gray knickerbockers, black ^ 

: stockings, black Boy Scout shoes and a checked or striped cap, too small for him. ; 

: Please keep a lookout for this boy, and if you find any trace of him, send full informa- ; 

[ tion to his father, Robert Tisdale, care U. S. Engineer office, 4th and 1st National Bank I 

I Building, Nashville, Tennessee; or to the nearest Baltimore and Ohio captain of police. ( 




^OHN McPHERSON was whist- 
ling an old Scotch air as he went 
swinging down the hill. At the 
corner of the street he turned 
and waved his cap to his wife and "men" 
(as he usually called their two sturdy boys 
of four and six) who stood on the porch 
of a white house high up on the hill, 
almost at the edge of the timber. 

Although John was a man of splendid 
physical strength and energy, he said he 
always felt heavy and oppressed when 
down in the valley and that he knew that 
he would take to bad habits if he were 
ever compelled to live there. Real living, 
he said, was on the hill top above the 
fogs, where there was clean air to 
breathe — and climbing the hill kept him 
in good trim. 

This morning he waved his cap just a 
little higher and just a little longer than 
usual, for his heart was light. He had 
carried his train over the regular route 
day after day, through the snapping zero 
weather and through the spring freshets 
that followed, and no accidents had 
happened. True, a number of days he 
had been running late, but he had always 
been able, even through the trying 
weather, to land his precious cargo of 
human freight in safety, and he had a 
singing thankfulness to God in his heart 
that he had for so long been able to do 



so — for that is the kind of man that John 
McPherson was. 

And now May had come, the elixir of 
spring was in his veins, and he felt on 
good terms with everything alive. 

He walked a little faster when he saw 
a woman, carrying a heavy basket, going 
toward the station. As he overtook her 
he saw that she was an old woman, 
poorly dressed. Her hands were gnarled 
from rheumatism and the stoop of her 
shoulders gave mute evidence of the toil 
of many years. 

"May I carry your basket?" he asked. 
Then, without waiting for an answer, he 
took it gently from her and fell in with 
her slow and uncertain step. There was 
a happy smile of pride and anticipation 
on her little wrinkled face as she told 
him how Bennie, her boy, had sent for 
her to come to visit him. He was work- 
ing down at Sheldon and doing well now, 
and he had sent her a ticket, too! His 
eye sight was poor and it was hard for him 
to keep a job, but now his boss had 
bought glasses for him. It was with 
tears of joy in her eyes that she looked up 
at John and said: 

"And, oh, mister, he says as how I 
mustn't take in washing any more." 

John could hardly get away, even after 
he had found her a seat in the waiting 
room and had told her just how and when 



26 



The Heart of The 
Engineer 



By Mrs. Cora M. Turner 

Wife of Agent at Butler, Pa. 
(Prize Story in Fiction Contest) 



to get on her train. She was so full of 
happiness that she simply had to tell 
some one about it. When he left her she 
insisted on pressing on him a handful of 
chestnuts that she fished out of her 
basket — chestnuts of an age that would 
have made an idle dentist's heart rejoice. 

The train was made up and John, as 
was his custom, walked the length of it 
on one side and back to the engine 
on the other side. He was a firm believer 
in "Safety First." His work meant 
much more to him than his pay envelope. 
He felt that he was an important part of 
the great organization of his road, and 
that it was up to him to do his part well. 
Guarding the lives of the passengers and 
carrying them safely to their destination 
was to him a sacred trust, and before 
starting he always wanted to know that 
all parts of the train, as well as of his 
engine, were in good condition. 

After he had finished his inspection and 
climbed into the cab he leaned out of the 
window and bared his head to the warm 
sunshine, and felt it was good to be alive 
on such a wonderful morning. 

John McPherson, although first of all 
an efficient engineer, was a philosopher 
and a dreamer. While driving his 
engine he had but one thought — the 
proper performance of his duty. But in 
idle moments he was given to watching 



his fellow men and speculating on their 
actions. Now, as he leaned from the cab 
window and watched the crowd pushing 
and jolting to get on the train he won- 
dered why people were always in such 
nervous haste and always fearful that the 
train would pull out and leave them. 
Didn't they know that carrying passengers 
was the railroad's business, and that the 
more passengers carried the greater the 
revenue? 

In the crowd he saw the little old lady 
with her basket. The expression of her 
face had changed to anxiety as she tried 
to make her way through the crowd. 
Just then two boys, almost grown men, 
jostled her roughly and crowded in ahead 
of her. John's fists clenched and he 
muttered "cuss." Then his habit of 
philosophic thought came into play, and 
he compared the hurrying crowd with 
life. Life, he thought, is a journey, and 
all the swarming millions of the peoples 
of the world are travelers. For some it is 
a short journey, for others a little longer. 
For a few, who are weary and travel- 
stamed and who long to reach their 
destination, it is too long. Some riding 
in parlor cars — some in day coaches — 
some in the smoker — some stealing rides 
on the freights and some unfortunates 
even hanging precariously to the bumpers. 
Many are pushing and crowding for the 



27 



28 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



best seats, without a thought of their 
fellow travelers — some are giving their 
seats to those who are weak and tired — 
many are buried behind papers or books 
with " Don't you dare speak to me" 
written all over their faces — some are 
giving cheer and courage to disheartened 
travelers — some are stopping to help to 
their feet those who have stumbled on 
rough places — others are directing and 
assisting others who have taken the wrong 
road — many, with despair written on their 
faces, struggle painfully on — others, 
with an indifferent shrug of the shoulder 
and a careless "I don't care," drift along. 
Many others, with hope and happiness 
shining in their eyes, journey sturdily 
along, and others, especially old people, 
wear a look of contentment, as if they 
carried a happy secret and knew that at 
the end of the journey they would find a 
" mansion" and the "Great Loving 
Master" waiting to welcome them. 

The call of "all aboard" brought John 
back to the present. He pulled his cap 
well down over his eyes, settled back in 
his seat and put his hand on the throttle. 
The day's work had begun and John 
believed in strict attention to duty. The 
time for dreaming was past. 

He was making his return trip. The 
day's work was almost over and he had 
a feeling of having done it well. At 
Sheldon he had watched for the little old 
lady of the morning and had seen her and 
her Bennie and knew that at least one of 
his passengers was supremely happy. 
And now, before starting on his journey 
home, he was thinking of Mary and his 
"men" in the white cottage on the hill. 
He was building a sort of rude swimming 
pool and gymnasium where his boys and 
the neighbors' boys could learn to swim, 
and have health-giving exercise as well 
as heaps of fun. Long before he had 
determined to keep his boys busy as a 
"Safety First" precaution, for he knew 
from experience that the devil always has 
a job waiting for idlers. 

It was a fine evening. There would be 
at least two hours of good daylight for 
work. The sun was hanging in the 

golden west, the sky looked like an 



immense blue dome, the birds seemed to 
be fairly screaming at one another in the 
hurry of nest building. The leaves were 
budding out and green things were spring- 
ing up everywhere. 

His engine was singing along, keeping 
time with the great heart throbs of power. 
The fireman straightened up, imitating a 
man with a sore back. 

"Oh Johnnie, me boy, if ye hev' no 
mercy on the pain in me poor back, plaze 
think of me ould mither over in Ireland." 

"I know what is the matter with you, 
Pat. You were born lazy — you shy at 
work. I know all about your relatives 
in the Old Country — I know you left 
your mother and Ireland for the good of 
them both." And John McPherson's 
laugh rang out as he whistled for the next 
stop, a mining settlement through which 
they passed before entering the town 
proper. 

The laugh died on his lips and he 
uttered an exclamation of horror — a man 
staggering drunk was on the edge of the 
track, just ahead. John applied the 
brakes and blew the whistle frantically. 
The man seemed to hesitate, then drunk- 
enly waved his hand and staggered out 
on the track. John McPherson's heart 
almost stopped beating. He closed his 
eyes and cried, "Oh God, save him." 

When the train came to a stop 
and he, tried to stand, his knees were 
trembling. When he heard some one 
say "the poor wretch is done for," he 
felt nauseated and weak, as if he had been 
struck a blow on the head. 

At the signal to- proceed, it was only by 
a great effort that he could steady his 
hand to bring his train up to the station. 
He was stunned. His daylight had 
changed to darkness. The thing that he 
had always dreaded had happened. He 
had run down a man and ground the life 
out of him. He felt that he must get 
away, and as he pushed through the 
crowd the remark of a bystander felt like 
a stab — "The train ran over a fellow down 
the track and killed him. Guess he was 
drunk. " 

******* 

Mary had supper ready. It was time 
lor John to come, so she took off her 
kitchen apron and arranged her hair a 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



20 



little. She was the kind of woman who 
believes in keeping the love and respect 
of her husband by keeping her good 
looks — and she had them aplenty. As 
she stood on the porch, with the sun 
making golden shades in her brown hair 
and health glowing in her strong face, 
she was certainly good' to look at. 
Usually she wore white. For this custom 
she gave two reasons — white was very 
becoming to her and the color never 
faded. She had a strong sense of humor 
that helped her over many trying situa- 
tions, and she was wise in her age and 
generation and had decided opinions of 
her own on the great civic and moral 
questions of the day. 

When she saw John join the "men" 
she wondered why he took the baby in 




his arms and sat down on the ground. 
Usually he swung him high on his 
shoulder and carried him up the hill. 

When he told her what had happened 
she comforted him as only a good woman 
can. When he asked her to take the boys 
in to supper and said that he could not 
eat just yet, but that he would go up into 
the woods for a while, she wisely con- 
sented and brought him a cup of coffee, 
telling him that he would find his supper 
warm on the stove if he was a little late 
getting back. 

The "men" could not understand why 
Daddy did not eat his supper, or why he 
went up to see the big trees without 
them. Mother explained to them that 
Daddy was just a ittle sick and that he 
had gone up the mountain side, where 



God would make him well. Then she 
saw an avalanche of questions descend- 
ing and tried to avert it, but too late. 

"Does God live up in the big trees?" 

" Yes, darling. Xow drink your milk." 

After a few minutes of deep thought : 

"Mother, why didn't you take me up 
to the trees and get God to make me well 
when I had the measles?" 

"Oh Jack," she evaded, "hurry up 
and finish your supper. I know where 
there is a patch of the most beautiful 
violets. We will take a basket and pick 
loads of them." 

When the stars were shining and the 
moon was a wonderful silver ball in the 
east, Mary came out on the porch and 
stood looking up into the sky and 
murmured, "0 Father in Heaven, give 



me tact to tell my boys the right thing at 
the right time." 

A minute before she had been putting 
them to bed and Jack, drowsy with sleep, 
said, "Mother, let's take Bob up to see 
God, and get his leg mended." 

Bob was their dog. He had been 
nosing around among the stones that they 
were using in the foundation of the gym 
and one had rolled on his foot. 

John did not go out on his run the 
next day. He did not feel equal to it. 
He had a feeling of guilt, as if he had 
committed a great crime. A great 
burden seemed to be weighing him 
down. 

He spent most of the day in hard 
physical work, digging and shoveling 
hard rock and clay. As usual the "men" 




30 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



were with him. " Daddy, does God live 
up in the big trees all the time?" 

"God lives in heaven," answered John, 
as he wiped the perspiration from his 
face. 

"No, Daddy, he doesn't. He lives up 
in the trees, 'cause mother said he did." 

"All right, my boy, you can depend on 
your mother. If she says so, it is true." 

In the evening Mary came out and 
joined John on the steps. She held up 
for his inspection a basket of violets. 

"Aren't they beautiful? I am going 
to take them down to his wife. Will you 
come with me?" 

With an effort he went to get his hat 
and coat. But when he came out his face 
was so full of trouble that Mary's heart 
failed her. 

"John, if you would rather not, I will 
go alone." 

"No, Mary, I'm going with you." 

They found the place easily, for the 
yard was filled with men and women — 
rough looking men and slatternly women. 
It was a poor looking place, with coal 
ashes scattered over the yard and not a 
blade of grass. The little house seemed 
to be full of people, and when Mary and 
John walked up to the door they were 
met with sullen looks and low mutterings. 
But Mary was a brave woman— she 
walked into the room carrying her basket 
of flowers, handed them to a woman who 
sat near the casket and began to tell her 
how sorry her husband felt about the 
accident. 

The woman snatched the flowers, threw 
them on the floor and began grinding 
them to pieces under her heel, crying at 
the top of her voice "He killed my man. 
There is the fellow" (pointing to John) 
"who killed my man." Immediately there 
was an uproar. In a moment the crowd 
was a menacing mob, ready for anything. 

"Came, John, let us go," said Mary, 
and with her head held high, she walked 
fearlessly out. As they made their way 
through the crowd who gathered around 
the door, they heard threats on every 
side. 

"The railroad company will have to 
put up a stiff price for this job," said 
one of the fellows, and a woman, un- 
lovely in appearance, but strong looking, 



answered, "Them fellers don't care how 
many of our men they kill." Then a 
bleary-eyed man, reeking with the 
fumes of whiskey, shook his fist in John 
McPherson's face. A companion pulled 
the drunken man back, growling: "You 
fool, let him alone, the jury will soak him 
and his company good and hard." "Yes," 
chimed in a woman, perhaps enviously, 
"his widder needn't worry — she'll git 
plenty to keep her all-righty." 

John raised his hand and attempted 
to speak, but his voice was drowned by 
the uproar. They climbed the hill in 
silence. When they reached the house 
John dropped on the first step of the 
porch and buried his face in his hands, 
while great sobs shook his strong body. 

Mary placed her hand on his shoulder. 

"John, stop!" she said, her voice ring- 
ing with indignation. "You are not the 
murderer of that man. You are just as 
innocent of his death as am I. You had 
no thought of injuring him, neither had 
any other man working on that train. 

"The man who sold that poor fellow 
the whiskey to deaden his brain is the 
murderer. And back of the man w T ho 
sold the whiskey is the judge who 
granted the license to sell it, and back of 
the judge are the voters who voted to 
establish and protect by law this accursed 
business. These are the murderers, and 
to God they each one will have to answer. 

"The railroad company is not re- 
sponsible for accidents like this one. It 
is alcohol and those who stand back of it. 
How can men who think they are 
Christians — men who are made in the 
image of their God — men who would 
scorn to steal or tell a lie — give support 
to this awful destruction? Men who for 
the sake of money or position, by use of 
the ballot, will scar their souls and de- 
liberately give to their fellow men a 
poison that will change them from 
thinking, intelligent beings to muttering 
idiots and staggering imbeciles! 

"Alcohol is like 'The Magnetic Island' 
of the 'Arabian Nights' that gradually 
drew splendid ships nearer, and nearer, 
and nearer. Then, suddenly, without 
warning or sound, the splendid ships fell 
into a thousand pieces and tloated away 
on Hie sea. 'The Magnetic Island' had 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



31 



drawn out every nail and screw and bolt. 
Drink is just like that — it stealthily 
draws out every good in a man and leaves 
him a wreck, floating on the sea of life." 

As she finished speaking, John raised 
himself to his full six feet and squared 
his shoulders. The emotion and nervous- 
ness was gone. His face was filled with 
determination and his voice rang clear 
and strong. 

"You are right, Mary," he said, u Iam 
innocent of that man's death. It was 
booze that did it." He raised his hand 
toward Heaven and cried, "So help me 
God I will help fight this thing as long 
as I have life in my body — fight it to 
the last ditch, fight it until it is down 
and out, and the poor drunk is given a 
chance." 

"Amen, John. Election, day comes 
next Tuesday." 

He turned and saw Mary standing 
above him with a great light shining in 
her eyes. 



The Author df the Prize Story a 
Modern Woman in the Best 
Sense of the Term 

ROM her story you will guess 
that Mrs. Cora M. Turner, the 
wife of our agent at Butler, Pa., 
and the author of "The Heart 
of the Engineer," this month's prize 
winning story, is a modern woman, in 
the best sense of that much abused term. 
Her broad view of life, expressed in her 
story, is further proved by the letter 
she sent us in answer to our request 
that she tell the readers of the Magazine 
something about herself. After pro- 
testing that "there is nothing that I can 
say of myself that would be of interest 
to anyone," she says: 

"I am very proud to be a resident of 
Butler. Our worthy judge has taken 
our county out of the class of followers 
and placed it in the front rank with the 
leaders, thereby conserving the best 
energies of every citizen for our beloved 
nation when the call comes. 

" I am a very fortunate woman — I have 
a daughter and a perfectly good husband, 




MRS. CORA M. TURNER 



who has been with the Baltimore and 
Ohio for— well, I dare not say how many 
years, for he is still posing as a young 
man. 

"Just now we are very busy launching 
our agricultural work. Our good friends 
Honorable and Mrs. J. M. Galbreath 
have generously divided their garden 
with Dr. Atwell, one of our leading- 
physicians and with us. 

"I have a suspicion that the Judge 
and the Doctor and Mr. Turner may 
deem it necessary to sit in the shade and 
ponder on great matters of state while 
the women folks till the soil — but we 
shall see. If our garden dreams mate- 
rialize we will not only be able to feed a 
few soldiers but may have sufficient for 
the Baltimore and Ohio commissaries." 

Mrs. Turner is proud of Butler — and we 
venture a guess that Butler is quite as 
proud of Mrs. Turner. 

Nature is neither kernel nor shell, 
She is both, one and the other as well ; 
Make it your aim, yourself to discover — 
If you are the inside or only the cover. 

— Goethe. 




Baltimore and Ohio Trapshooting Club 
Opens the Season of 1917 



HE denizens of Halethorpe were 
alarmed by the sound of firing 
on the afternoon of Saturday, 
May 12. Had von Hindenburg 
transferred his activities from France to 
Maryland? Had a German submarine 
made its way up the Patapsco and 
started the bombardment of Baltimore? 
Not a bit of it! It was the Baltimore 
and Ohio Trapshooting Club opening 
the season of 1917. As they say in the 
official communiques, "the losses of the 
enemy were heavy." When the setting 
sun gave the signal to cease firing the 
battle ground was covered with the 
fragments of what had been perfectly 
good clay pigeons. 



The Trapshooting Club is in a most 
flourishing condition. New buildings 
have been erected, the membership has 
increased and everything looks promising 
for a successful season. A big day is 
anticipated in the near future — ladies' 
day. The ladies may be able to shoot, 
but — well, the trenches of Flanders would 
be a "Safety First'' location compared 
with the immediate vicinity of the firing 
line on that particular afternoon. We 
advise the boys who pull the traps to 
study the most modern methods of con- 
structing bomb-proofs, dug outs and 
trenches. 

If you like to shoot take a trip to Hale- 
thorpe some Saturday afternoon. 




THE OFFICERS OF THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO TRAPSHOOTING CLUB 
From l »f( to rigbi J. A. Hazkuov Vice-President; w. H, Schidb, Field Captain; W. E. Hampton, Secretary and 
Treasurer) and II. M. Constaktinb, President 



32 



War, Food, and the Cost of Living 



By W. H. Manss 

Assistant to Vice-President 
In charge of Commercial Development 



□ □ 

□ □ 



STARVATION of the most highly 
civilized people of the earth, a 
condition no one believed possible 
a few years ago, is now about to 
become a grim fact. The fighting nations 
of Europe are not facing a period of 
hunger but of real starvation. And 
bread and meat cards seem to be neces- 
sary in this country if we are to serve 
our allies as we should. 

Bread and meat cards in the United 
States, the Land of Plenty! Never 
before has the world been so short of 
food stuffs, particularly meats and bread 
producing cereals and potatoes. The 
armies have eaten the surplus stocks and 
in some lines there is an actual shortage 
even for seed. 

For example: The Argentine wheat 
crop is almost a total failure and an 
embargo has been placed on exports. 
The United States crop of winter wheat 
is in poorer condition that at any time 
for years past. The present condition is 



reported as 63.4 as against 76.5 in 1904, 
the worst year previously reported. 
The indicated yield is 430,000,000 
bushels, the lowest since 1912. 

With the Argentine crop harvested 
and a failure, the Australian crop but 
little better than a failure, the American 
winter wheat crop but 60 per cent, of a 
success, and with our reserve stock only 
40 per cent, of the average, how can we 
hope to aid the French Minister of 
Agriculture, who recently stated that his 
nation would need 360,000,000 bushels of 
wheat to carry it through this year? 

Our corn supply is 22 per cent, below 
normal, while our oat supply is off 35 
per cent. As for potatoes we have 
almost no supply at all, as last year's 
production was only 53 per cent, of 
average. 

Nature, during the period of the war, 
has been most niggardly, as the United 
States production figures (see table) show : 

With 16,000,000 men in the trenches 



■ 






Per 


Blshels Per Capita 




Yield Bushels 


Cent. 


for Home 








Decrease 


Consumption. 




1915 


1916 




1915 


1916 


Wheat 


1,025,801,000 


639,886,000 


37.6 


7.2 


4.8 


Corn 


2,994,773,000 


2,583,241,000 


13.7 


29.8 


24.7 


Oats 


1,549,030,000 


1,251,992,000 


19.2 


14.3 


11.2 


Rye 


54,050,000 


47,383,000 


12.3 


.47 


.12 


Barley 


228,851,000 


180,927,000 


20.96 


2.01 


1.6 


Potatoes 


359,721,000 


285,437,0 


20.6 


3.5 


2.7 


Total 




6,212,226,000 


4,988,866,000 


19.6% 







33 




and 48,000,000 more devoting all their 
energies to keep the fighters supplied 
with equipment, and with general un- 
favorable weather conditions, the pro- 
ductive power of the world has been 
materially decreased. It is no wonder 
then that food prices are reaching new 
high levels almost daily, and that one 
dollar will now buy only a peck of 
potatoes as compared with a bushel for 
forty-three cents in the spring of 1915. 

However, these conditions are not 
surprising to one who has made a close 
study of the cost of living. Other wars 
have affected the general price level in 
very much the same way and to even 
greater extents. Tables, computed for 
the United States Government by Dr. 
Roland P. Falkner, show that the price 
of food increased during the Mexican 
War period. During and following the 
Crimean War, which scarcely caused a 
ripple on this side of the Atlantic, the 
prices of food increased 14% in 1853, 
20< r in 1854, 25% in 1855 and 56, and 
30% in 1857 above those of 1852. They 
never dropped again to the 1852 level. 

Relative to the year I860, a normal 
year, the advances in food and clothing 
during and following the Civil War are 
shown to be: 



Per Cent. Increase over 1860 



Year 


Food 


Clothing 


1862 


10.4 


24.1 


1863 


83.0 


91.6 


1864 


65.8 


160.7 


1865 


116.5 


199.2 


1866 


73.6 


126.6 


1867 


63.9 


79.9 


1868 


64.2 


46.8 


1869 


62.9 


47.5 


1870 


53.8 


39.4 


1871 


69.3 


33.3 



The general level of food prices never 
receded to antebellum levels, and only 
in three years since 1860 have they 
dropped below that base, those yeais 
being 1879, 1885 and 1886. 

In 1897 a strong upward tendency in 
food prices developed, and during the 
years covering the Spanish- American, the 
British-Boer and the Russo-Japanese 
wars this tendency was augmented by 
the scarcity of food stuffs and the 
artificial or unusual demands created. 

Judging from historical evidence and 
current conditions, we may be confident 
that the net and ultimate effects of our 
entrance into the war will be to aggravate 
the upward tendency in the prices of 

food stuffs. 

Is there a remedy? Can anything be 
done to cheek this upward movement in 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



35 



prices or are we to sit back and face the 
inevitable? Fortunately the whole coun- 
try is alarmed over the situation and is 
studying solutions to the problem. 
Man}- suggestions of value have already 
been made and many more are, we hope, 
yet to come. 

Clearly, it is your duty and mine not 
only to study the problem in the hope of 
finding a solution, but also to lend all 
possible aid towards conserving the 
supply of food stuffs now on hand and 
increasing their production during the 
coming years. 

" Cooperation for increased production 
of food stuffs" should be everybody's 
slogan. School boys who can farm 
should be excused from school for the 
balance of the year with full credit for 
their year's work upon certification that 
they will work at farming. 



Vacationists, instead of wasting their 
time, should help the farmers harvest 
their crops. After all, a vacation is but 
a temporary change in employment, and 
farm work, though hard, is most health}'. 
And the farmer should make his sacrifice 
by working just a little bit harder to get 
a greater yield per acre and a greater 
number of acres yielding. 

And lastly, the farmer should, above 
all else, determine to pay a fair wage and 
provide fair living conditions for his 
workmen. Until the American farmer 
decides to compete with the industries 
in these matters, he cannot hope to secure 
or hold laborers on the farm. 

The farmer, the city man, everybody 
must rise to his patriotic duty: " Increase 
the production of food stuffs, that the 
allied armies may be successful — feed 
the people." 



Think First — 
Don't be 
Sorry 
Afterward 




Courtesy 



American Locomotive 
Company 





Employes who have been honorably retired during the month'of April, 1917, and to whom pensions 
have been granted : 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Cameron, William F . 

Clark, John 

Dooley, William E. 

Dressel, Frank 

Fleming, Peter 

Jones, Joseph P 

Kinstendorff, Aug. M 
Singleton, Lilburn . . . 
Trundle, Joseph H . 



Machinist 

Laborer 

Engineer 

Car Inspector 

Engineer 

Painter Foreman . . . 

Agent 

Crossing Watchman 
Ticket Agent 



M. P Indiana. . . 

M. of W Pittsburgh. 

C. T Baltimore. . 

M. P Baltimore. . 

C. T I Wheeling. . 

M. of W Ohio River. 

C. T Baltimore. . 

C. T | Illinois 

C. T I Baltimore. . 



47 
30 
49 
28 
41 
29 
48 
10 
28 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1916, over $296,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,030,054.10: 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number of years, the following employes have 
died : 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPART- 
MENT 



Daly, Patrick F 

Anderson, Benjamin F. 

Crook, Edward J 

Fritz, Philip C 

Ijams, Joseph A 

Lemen, A. W 

Matthews, Anselm H . 
Hartling, Frederick 
Hefner, Nathaniel 

Ingalls, John D 

Costello, Bartley 
Bigelow, Thomas J. . . 
Kinstendorff, Aug. M 



Crossing Watchman . 

Laborer 

Engineer 

Paver 

Train Baggagemaster 

Watchman 

Car Inspector 

Trackman 

Fireman 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Car Distributer 

Agent 



C. T 

M. ofW.I 
M. P. . 
M. of W. 
C. T 
C. T... . 
M. P . 
M.of W. 
C. T 
M. P 
M. P. 
C. T ... . 
C. T i 



DIVISION 



DATE OF 
DEATH 



New Castle. . . April 2, 1917. 

Cumberland... April 5,1917. 

Baltimore April 5, 1917. 

Baltimore April 5, 1917. 

Newark April 6, 1917. 

Cumberland.. . April 15, 1917. 

Ohio April 17, 1917. 

Wheeling April 18, 1917. 

Monongah April 18, 1917. 

Baltimore April 18, 1917. 

Connellsville April 19, 1917. 

Cleveland April 20, 1917. 

Baltimore April 26, 1917. 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



51 
39 
30 
43 
42 
20 
43 
31 
32 
27 
31 
27 
48 



The System Baseball League Preparing 
for a Busy Season 



Two Cups, in Addition to the Championship, 
will go to the Winning Team 



spite of war, the high cost of 
living and the numerous other 
\C£ftg>\ cares and worries of daily life, 
there is one interest that never 
dies in the brain of the red-blooded 
American — baseball. In fact, baseball, 
originally, was a war game. It was 
first played by the soldiers of the Union 
Armies, who, after the war, brought the 
game home with them, taught it to others 
and thus laid the foundation of the 
American national sport. And because 
it is a real American game, requiring 
skill, judgment and courage, it will be 
played by thousands of boys in khaki in 
the mobilization camps this summer. 
Perhaps next summer it will be played 
behind the lines in France — or Germany 
— by the same boys. But they will not 
be pioneers. Canadians are almost as 
fond of baseball as are their cousins in 
the States, and there has been many a 
hard fought game played within sound 
of the guns. 

Most railroaders can not go to the 
front and although there is plenty of 
work ahead for them there will also be 
time for play. This is a time, above all 
others, when every man should be at 
his best, and there is nothing that will 
keep him at his best better than will 
good clean sport. 

Last Spring, when the Baltimore and 
Ohio System Baseball League was organ- 
ized and vice-president Thompson offered 
the Thompson Challenge Cup for com- 
petition, the response from the employes 
of our big System was quick and enthu- 



siastic. Over ninety teams competed 
for the honor of winning the System 
championship and of possessing the 
Challenge Cup for a year. The final 
game, between the Chillicothe and Phila- 
delphia teams, was played at Homewood 
Field, the athletic plant of John Hopkins 
University, in Baltimore, on Labor Day, 
before a large crowd of enthusiastic em- 
ployes and many equally enthusiastic 
officials, including president Willard and 
vice-presidents Thompson, Davis and 
Shriver. The Philadelphia team won 
the game and with it the championship 
and possession of the Thompson Cup for 
a year. 

This year it is expected that the compe- 
tition will be even keener than last and 
that over a hundred teams will compete 
for the honors. In addition to the 
Thompson Challenge Cup there will be 
another trophy, the Davis Cup, donated 
by vice-president Davis, who is greatly 
interested in the development of sports 
among our employes. This cup will 
become the property of the team winning- 
it. The winning team will also have 
possession of the Thompson Challenge 
Cup for a year, and as much longer as 
they can retain it . The baseball competi- 
tion will again be under the auspices of 
the Welfare Bureau. Dr. Parlett, chief 
of the bureau, who is also the chairman 
of the General Athletic Committee, takes 
a keen interest in the sport, and the 
masterly way in which he conducted last 
year's competition (with an organization 
formed just before the opening of the 



37 



38 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



season) gives assurance that this year 
playing conditions will be as satisfactory 
as it is possible to make them. 

There was just one unfortunate con- 
dition in last year's contest — there were 
too many protests. It is not desired 
that a team that feels that it has been 
discriminated against should not protest. 
But in a game with as complicated a set 
of rules as has baseball there will be 
occasions when the best intentioned and 
fairest umpires will be at fault in de- 
ciding some technical point. The rules 
were made to give each team a fair and 
equal chance of victory — not to allow 
one team to take advantage of some 
minor technicality to win victory or stave 
off defeat. Article I of the Constitution 
of the Athletic Association is a good 
guide in this matter — "the Association's 
object shall be to promote and encourage 
clean athletic sports and the mainte- 
nance of a high standard of health, 
fellowship, and courtesy among em- 
ployes." It is the hope and wish of 
president Willard, of the management 
and of the Welfare Bureau, that the spirit 
of that rule will be lived up to, with the 
most scrupulous care, by each and every 




man interested in Baltimore and Ohio 
athletics. 

In any athletic contest the position of 
umpire, referee or judge is a most diffi- 
cult one to fill satisfactorily. This is 
especially true in baseball. A thorough 
knowledge of the game, quick decision 
and strong character are required. This 
year the men for these positions have 
been picked with the utmost care. No 
umpire will officiate on his own division. 
The Company will pay the men so acting 
their full time while away from work 
for this purpose, and furnish transporta- 
tion. Their division athletic association 
will reimburse them for necessary travel- 
ing expenses. In this way every team 
will be assured of absolutely fair and 
disinterested umpiring. 

In addition to the baseball season, 
already under way, teams are training 
for tennis, track, trap shooting and tug- 
of-war events. Let us hope that in every 
athletic activity the spirit of president 
Willard's words, spoken when he tossed 
the ball onto the field for last year's final 
game, will be the by-word for both 
players and spectators — "May the best 
team win!" 



STANDARD SINGLE TRACK NEAR IRA, ON THE CLEVELAND DIVISION 



Safety First 



By Clarence Feltz Dotson 

Engineer, Monongah Division 
(Prize Article on Accident Prevention) 

(An appreciation of Mr. Dotson's faithful and efficient service was published in the January, 1917, 

issue of the Employes Magazine) 



T— THE best way to prevent accidents 
and carelessness among em- 
ployes is to educate them in the 
principles of Safety First. 
We have all seen the benefit derived 
from educational work along this line. 
There is a great deal in starting men to 
thinking. And much more can be 
accomplished by constantly keeping at 
them — making them think where they are 
and what they are doing. There is no 
doubt that many of the accidents that 
occur are caused by thoughtlessness and 
that many accidents would not occur if 
the employe had his mind on his work. 

Keep your mind on your work and 
you will keep your legs and arms on your 
body! You will also save the lives of 
others and save your Company's prop- 
erty. 

I hope that every employe who has 
been fortunate enough to see the Safety 
motion picture "The House That Jack 
Built," will never forget the lesson that 
it teaches — that "Safety First" begins 
in the home. If we are happy at home 
our minds will be clear and free from 
worry while we are at work away from 
home. The picture play also teaches 
us that we must have our minds on the 
work we are doing and that we must 
watch where we put our feet and hands. 

The man in the shop should be very 
careful at his work, not only that he may 
keep from injuring himself, but so that 
he will not injure his fellow workers. 
When doing work that is dangerous to 
the eyes he should not fail to wear the 



goggles that the Company has provided. 
The shopman must not slight his work 
in the slightest degree, for one little 
defect in an engine may cause a serious 
accident on the road. The shop fore- 
man, the inspectors, and the others who 
are in responsible positions, should see 
that the engines are in good condition 
before they are turned out for road 
service. 

The engineer and fireman should ex- 
amine their engine before leaving the 
terminal. When they couple onto a 
train the trainmen should be at their 
proper places and brakes should be 
tested. At every point along the line 
where cars are set off or picked up the 
brakes should again be tested. An ex- 
amination should be made of all the cars 
in the train at every point where a stop 
is made. 

When, for any cause, a train comes to 
a stop, the engineer should not fail to 
give the proper whistle signal for the 
flagman to go back and protect the rear 
of his train. And he should always call 
in the flagman before leaving. If this 
rule is always observed the train will be 
properly protected. 

The engineer and fireman should 
examine their engine at every oppor- 
tunity and see that everything is in 
good condition. The engine crew and 
the train crew should notice the position 
of switches and the condition of the 
track. 

The engineer should use judgment in 
handling his train around curves and 




39 



40 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



bad places, and run at such a rate of 
speed that there will be no danger of de- 
railing his engine or train. Keep the 
number plate on your engine clean, so 
there will be no mistake made. Come 
into all meeting points and looking out 
points under full control. Don't fail to 
sound your whistle for every crossing. 
A great many men use their own judg- 
ment and take chances instead of abso- 
lutely obeying the rules of the Company. 

In handling trains, by " block system, " 
" block rules" should be lived up to 
right to the letter. Train dispatchers and 
operators should not hesitate to give 
information and use all caution where 
there is the least b't of doubt. 

Take no chances. Be sure you are right 
and then go ahead. 

The car repairmen and car inspectors 
should be very careful to do their work 
well in every respect. The brakes must 
be in perfect order and the piston travel 
right up to where it belongs. Uneven 
piston travel causes more trains to be 
parted while running along, more ends 
pulled out of cars and more wheels 
flattened than any other one cause. 
Hence it is evident that the brakes 
should always be kept in perfect working 
order. And the men who handle them 
should use good judgment and handle 
them right. 

The engineer and trainmen should be 
possessed of the proper knowledge of 
how to manipulate and control the brakes 

■ ■ IIIMIHIII I I II I "HO I CJ X. It II; : [] nilltlilill 01:111 [Ill 

( ■ iimnimic.iiiiui t:n nine: nnnniniiini:ii nnc; iiimniimiiiiiiioiiniiiimoiiiiiniiiimii inuiin 01111111111110 ininii 

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in order to get the best results. Had 
brake handling is the cause of a great 
variety of accidents. The amount of 
money the Company has to pay out as a 
result of bad handling of the brakes runs 
up into thousands of dollars each year, 
and yet the engineer often excuses him- 
self by saying the brakes failed to work. 

Now a few words to trackmen. 

The section foreman is selected by his 
superior officer and given charge of a 
special territory to look after and to 
maintain. He is entrusted with thou- 
sands of dollars worth of Company 
material. He is also entrusted with a 
gang of men. He should look after 
those men and educate them to do their 
work in a safe way. He should teach 
his men to clear all running tracks while 
a train is passing. 

Protect your Company by protecting 
its property and protecting the life and 
limbs of yourself and of your men. The 
Company is spending thousands of dollars 
trying to educate its employes in 
" Safety" methods and every employe 
should lend a helping hand. 

I believe that the greatest loss of life 
on the railroads of the United States 
is among persons who are neither pas- 
sengers nor employes. 

They are trespassers on railroad prop- 
erty, and the railroad is known as the 
deadliest footpath on earth. 

Why take a chance when life is so 
sweet? 

ilt.n.ni [1 1 tit lit' CJillt 1IIU lit tlin.niinlltlin Itmui tininliinlioniiinuniuiliwnnill ■ ■ 

HUH [>»'. I miinnilU'ini t: mint) inuilD nnllClmin Uulm On HIU -1111111 win C ■ ■ 

1 I 

II 

I I 

I i 

1 1 

I I 

1 1 

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1 I 

H 

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1 1 
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Five Life Savers for a Typewriter 

Brush off all accumulated dirt at the beginning of the day. This will take only a few 

seconds but will add to the life of the typewriter. 
Oil the necessary parts at frequent intervals. A typewriter is a piece of machinery and 

needs oil to prevent friction and attendant wear. 
Always cover your typewriter when leaving it. This will help to keep it free from 

dirt and dust. 

Do not take spite out on your typewriter when you make a mistake. This is liable to 
lead to broken parts. 

Do not disturb the tension of your typewriter after it is once set. This is liable 
to cause trouble. //. 8. 8. 



The Increase in the Cost of Materials — Present 
Prices Compared with Previous 
Normal Prices 

The table below shows a list of thirty-six representative materials which are used in 
large quantities by the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. Opposite each item of material is 
shown the present cost or value of a quantity of the material which formerly cost one 
dollar, when purchased at the previous normal price. 

One dollar's worth of Tool Steel, High Speed, now costs $5.80 



One dollar's worth of Boiler Steel, now costs 5.44 

One dollar's worth of Steel Plates, now costs 4.77 

One dollar's worth of Firebox Steel, now costs 4.55 

One dollar's worth of Steel Billets, now costs 3.48 

One dollar's worth of Car Axles, now costs 3.44 

One dollar's worth of Car Roofs, now costs 3.35 

One dollar's worth of Bar Steel, now costs 3.20 

One dollar's worth of Driving Axles, now costs 3.00 

One dollar's worth of Pig Iron, now costs 2.92 

One dollar's worth of Coil Springs, now costs 2.60 

One dollar's worth of Bolts, now costs 2.54 

One dollar's worth of Bar Iron, now costs 2.52 

One dollar's worth of Flues, now costs 2.52 

One dollar's worth of Nuts, now costs 2.46 

One dollar's worth of Elliptic Springs, now costs 2.41 

One dollar's worth of Lead — Pig, now costs 2.37 

One dollar's worth of Babbitt, now costs. . 2.36 

One dollar's worth of Fuel Oil, now costs 2.34 

One dollar's worth of Journal Bearing Lining, now costs. 2.27 

One dollar's worth of Copper — Ingot, now costs 2.26 

One dollar's worth of Belting, now costs 2.12 

One dollar's worth of Couplers, now costs 2.06 

One dollar's worth of Steel Tires, now costs 2.02 

One dollar's worth of Wrot Washers, now costs 1.93 

One dollar's worth of Tin — Pig, now costs 1.85 

One dollar's worth of Air Hose, now costs 1.67 

One dollar's worth of Tin Plate, now costs 1.65 

One dollar's worth of Rolled Steel Wheels, now costs. . . 1.62 

One dollar's worth of Tool Steel, Carbon, now costs. . 1.57 

One dollar's worth of Cross Ties, now costs 1.38 

One dollar's worth of Steel Rail, now costs 1.33 

One dollar's worth of Malleable Castings, now costs. . 1.31 

One dollar's worth of Oak Lumber, now costs 1.30 

One dollar's worth of Steam Hose, now costs 1.18 

One dollar's worth of Jacket Iron, now costs 1.13 



Every Baltimore and Ohio employe uses material, in his daily work, which is more 
costly today than it has been heretofore, and which, in all likelihood, will be still more 
expensive in the future as a result of the general steady advance in prices which continues. 

With these conditions clearly in mind, every effort possible must be made to offset 
the increase in price of new material by greater care in the utilization of such second- 
hand and reclaimed material as can everywhere be made available for satisfactory ser- 
vice at comparatively little cost. 

Conservation of Material is the urgent necessity of the country at this time. The 
strictest economy in the use of material of every kind, as far as consistent with safety 
and efficiency, is not only desirable but is positively necessary. Any carelessness, 
resulting in the waste of material, whether new or second-hand, is inexcusable under 
the present conditions. 

Every foreman of the railroad has an opportunity now to show the quality of his 
supervising ability by the records he makes in the economical use of material. 

The Company confidently expects that every employe will do his best in this con- 
nection. It is only necessary for each one to exercise thoughtful intelligence and care, 
and the results cannot fail to be well worth while. 



42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine 



* Robert If. Van Saxt, Editor 
Arthur W. Grahame, Associate Editor 

* Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 
George B. Luckey, Staff Photographer 

*On furlough attending Officers' Reserve Corps Training Camp 

Members of Magazine Staff Answer 
the Call to the Colors 



R 



OBERT M. VAN SANT, the 
editor, and Herbert D. Stitt, the 
staff artist of the Employes 
Magazine, have been furloughed 
and are attending the Officers' Reserve 
Corps Training Camp, at Fort Myer, 
Virginia. 

They will take the three months course 
of intensive military training provided 
for the future officers of our new citizen 
army. At the end of the three months 
ten thousand of the forty thousand 
candidates will be sent into active service 
and the others who have done satis- 
factory work will be commissioned as 
officers of the Reserve Corps and will be 
subjecl to call as they are needed. We 
wish both gentlemen the very best of good 
luck — active service and a safe return. 

In the absence of Mr. Van Sant, the 
associate editor, Arthur W. Grahame, 
will be in charge of the Magazine. 

Arguing With Fritz 

HHE length of the blade of the 
United States Army bayonet is 
sixteen inches. It weighs a 
pound, has a sharp point and a 
wicked glitter and is attached to the 
business end of an eight and three-quarter 



pound rifle. This weapon, in the hands 
of a husky young American, with a 
sufficiently vicious fighting face, is the 
most efficacious argument that we can 
use to convince the German of the error 
of his ways. But before we can use it 
much must be done. 

Modern war is complex — more complex 
even than modern industry — for it is an 
amalgamation of all industries, all 
sciences and nearly all arts. Yet its 
fundamental principle is the same as it 
was when cave man fought cave man with 
tooth, nail, and a large and knobby club — 
to kill your enemy before he can kill 
you. 

The bayonet charge is the final ex- 
pression of the power of the immense, 
complicated organization that we call 
an army. More, it is the final expression 
of the power of the nation that stands 
behind the army. To make the charge 
possible all the efforts of the various arms 
of the service and of the many industries 
of the nation must be coordinated. 
Overhead aeroplanes must scout and 
fight. Great guns must thunder for 
days and days, breaking down the barbed 
wire entanglements of the enemy, blast- 
ing his trenches and bomb-proofs to bits, 
straining his nerves to the breaking point. 
Behind the lines roads must be mended, 
railroads built, bread baked and hos- 
pitals tended. Still further back (in 
our case across the sea), workshops must 
hum with activity, munition factories 
work day and night, farm workers sweat 
through the summer days, housewives 
economize as they have never economized 
before and, last but far from least, rail- 
roads be operated with the utmost 
efficiency — all that the doughty "dough 
boy" may be clothed, armed, supplied, 
fed and helped' so that he may, at the 
given moment, jump out of his trench 
and go yelling across "no man's land" to 
argue out with Fritz (with cold steel) 
the question of democracy vs. autocracy 
— of civilization vs. scientifically organ- 
ized and efficiently directed barbarism. 

The time has passed when the soldiers 
inarched to the troop ships, through 
streets thronged with cheering citizen-, 
to sail away and fight the battles of their 
country while the rest of the populat ion 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



went more or less unconcernedly about 
their daily tasks and read about the war 
in the newspapers. Modern war means 
work in some form for every citizen who 
is deserving of the name. It means 
sacrifice — sacrifice that each of us, soldier 
and civilian, must make and make cheer- 
fully. 

Many of us are wondering what our 
particular part will be. We want to do 
something, but can't find exactly what 
we should do. But as the war progresses 
and the organization for conducting it 
becomes more efficient opportunities for 
service will open for all those who want 
them. Be prepared to do your part, 
and you will find something that you can 
do. 

The railroader who is not called to the 
colors need not look far afield for his job 
in helping to win the war. The railroads 
are the arteries of the nation and upon 
their efficient operation depends, to a 
great extent, success or failure. The 
.railroad man, whatever his position, by 
putting just a little more effort, a little 
more efficiency, into his daily work will 
be rendering his country most valuable 
service. 

We must win the war. The future of 
America, of democracy, of the world, 
depends upon it. To win each and 
every one of us must work. Flag 
raisings and patriotic speeches, unless 
they are backed up by a stern determina- 
tion to bend every effort to the successful 
prosecution of the war, mean nothing. 
The real test is work — work in the 
trenches, at sea, in the wheat fields, in 
the shop and on the railroad. May every 
Baltimore and Ohio man do his part ! 



Get Out on Line 

H YOUNG man who had been in the 
service of the Company for five 
years and had done his work well, 
felt that he was getting into a 
rut. He was sensible enough to see that 
when his viewpoint was not enlarging as 
the years crept by, his chances for ad- 
vancement were not opening up either. 



^3 

So he went to an official, told him his 
story and asked him what to do. 

"Get out on line," replied the official. 
"There are lots of young fellows on the 
System who are in the same situation 
that you are. But the hopeful thing 
about your case as compared to theirs is 
that you realize that you are in trouble 
when most of them do not. 

"Get out on line. That is what I tell 
all my clerks who seem to be getting 
stale. Ride the trains, learn how the 
signals are operated, use your holidays 
to visit the big terminals and the big 
yards. Find out about the motive power, 
why this type engine is used here and the 
other type there. Talk to the operating 
men, ride the rear end whenever you can, 
get the viewpoint of the man in the 
caboose. Find out what he thinks about 
Safety. Then see the trackmen and 
spend a couple of hours with a section 
gang. Some of the wisest men on our 
big System are the section foremen and 
supervisors. And they are usually glad 
to talk to a young man who is seeking 
information. 

"If I were in your position that is the 
course I would follow. It will give you 
a bird's eye view of the infinite amount 
of detail on a System as big as the 
Baltimore and Ohio. It will sharpen 
your wits by putting you in contact with 
the other man who is helping run the big 
machine. It may give you an idea of 
some special kind of railroad work for 
which you are peculiarly adapted. If it 
does you can go ahead twice as fast as 
you have in the last few years." 

This advice, coming from an eminently 
successful man who has had experience in 
practically every kind of railroad work, is 
worthy of careful consideration. 



"That the world shall, under 
God, have a new birth of freedom, 
and that government of the people, 
by the people, for the people shall 
not perish from the earth." — 
Abraham Lincoln. 




Freight Claim Department — 
Cooperative Claim Prevention 

The Troubles of Mr. W ay-Bill and the 
Freight Family 




No. 5 — Hauling and Handling 

"Do you know I have been having the time of my life?" con- 
tinued Mr. Way-Bill. "I am on the road all of the time except 
when I go to the office to write up my troubles for you to read. 

"Well, the Auditor Freight Claims asked me what was the 
cause of claims for rough handling and unlocated damage and I 
undertook to find it. By gum, now I know. 

"I always rode in the baggage car with the R. R. S. mail, but 
in the baggage cars you never see what happens in the freight cars 
so these last trips I have put my time in with the freight and I 
got all that was coming to me. 

"Say, did you ever see a fellow who had been through a 
sausage stuffer and had then been pawed over by a threshing 
machine? Well, that was me until I got a chance to get combed 
and smoothed out. 

"Talk about bumps, those that I got made me think that some 
of the fellows who do rough-house switching and rapid-fire pull- 
ing and jerking believe that P. D. Q. spells Safety First, but it 
only spells C-L-A-I-M-S. 

"Well, my first out was in a refrigerator car, and somebody 
forgot to ice it and my, but wasn't it hot! After some hundreds 
of miles of this we struck a place where they iced the bunkers. 

"But somebody had missed cleaning out the drain pipes and 
the ice melted and the water ran down over the car floor. Did I 
get wet? Well I think I did and I'm clammy yet. I dozed off 
and dreamed I was in a flood and when I awoke every piece of 
perishables not spoiled by the heat was soaked by the drip. 

"Next I made a trip in a car that was set out by mistake at a 
station and I was sealed up there for three weeks until my family 
thought I had been kidnapped. Some one finally located me, 
but think of that claim. As I was there the shipper caught me 
with the goods and the Company had to come across with the 
big iron men. Then I made a trip with some cotton piece goods 
and they put the hooks into me as well as into the goods. Why don't the boys see that the claims 
'Get£the hook' instead of the goods? 

"Of course all of my riding wasn't like that, for I was in lots of cars that were loaded right, sealed 
right, handled right, switched carefully, and delivered on time. 

"Your battered-up friend, Mr. Way-Bill, knows from sad experience and his own investigations that 
the Company never scores a financial 'ten strike' when some one plays ten pins with the freight." 

Take care of your freight and the claims will take care of themselves. 
Enlist in the army of Care that fights to kill claims. 

The agent creates business, the loss and damage claim kills business. 

— H. Irving Merlin 



Hail! The Faithful Track Foreman 

Vigilance and Faithfulness are His Watchwords 



□ □ 

□ □ 



SHORT time ago vice-president 
Davis suggested that he would 
like to see the pictures of two or 
three of the oldest track foremen, 
and a picture of the oldest bridge car- 
penter foreman, of each Division, pub- 
lished in the Magazine. 

The importance of the work of the 
track foreman — and of his men — can 
hardly be exaggerated. Their responsi- 
bilities are heavy and upon their faith- 
fulness depends the safety of thousands 
of passengers and employes and of 
hundreds of thousands of dollars worth 
of equipment. Unceasing vigilance must 
be their watchword — vigilance extending 
through the storms of winter and the 



heat of summer. So, for the purpose of 
giving the veterans of this exacting branch 
of the service well deserved recognition 
requests have been sent to each corres- 
pondent to send us pictures of his 
Division's veteran track foremen and a 
picture of their oldest bridge carpenter 
foreman. 

The first of these pictures to be 
received is from the Wellston Division — 
of track foreman James Galloway, in 
charge of track work in Sandusky yard, 
and his force. Mr. Galloway, who is 
sixty-eight years old, has forty-six years 
of faithful and efficient service with the 
Baltimore and Ohio to his credit. Mr. 
Galloway is indicated by a cross. 




TRACK FOREMAN JAMES GALLOWAY AND HIS MEN 



4-5 



46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Members of the Debating Club 
Working Hard 

f&Jy INTEREST in the Baltimore and 
I8j1 J Ohio Debating Club, which meets 
lO^&l eacn Tuesday evening on the 
fifth floor of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Building, is unabated. Since the 
formation of the club the following sub- 
jects have been considered: breath 
control ; the proper position to assume 
while speaking; enunciation and articula- 
tion; force; earnestness and confidence; 
getting a stock of words, style and 
simplicity; conversation; imagination and 
originality; outlining a speech; com- 
mitting a speech to paper, and the use 
of the pause. 

At an early date a well known public 
speaker of Baltimore will address the 
club on the subject of " Gesture." 
Those who have taken the course feel 
that what they have learned will be of 
lasting benefit to them, and that in the 
future they will be able to put their 
thoughts over with force and enthusiasm. 
Some of them have already acquired a 
" punch." 

At a recent debate the following subject 
was discussed with great interest: Re- 
solved: Unanimity, rather than the vote 
of a majority, should be required as 
determining the verdict of a jury. 



who will be glad to see that they are 
supplied. This book should be in- 
valuable for new firemen and those who 
expect to take up this branch of railroad 
work. It contains all the essentials of 
the subject discussed. 

The other book is called "Rules and 
Regulations Governing the Handling of 
Air Brakes, Train Air Signals, Electric 
Headlights, Lighting and Heating Pas- 
senger Cars." It is issued by F. H. 
Clark, general superintendent motive 
power and approved by J. M. Davis, 
vice-president operation and mainte- 
nance. There are many books in exist- 
ence covering the subjects discussed in 
this edition, but none of them relate so 
particularly to the practices on the 
Baltimore and Ohio. This edition will 
be a veritable text-book for all those 
engaged in the operation of trains and 
any employe whose work demands that 
he be posted on the subjects discussed 
in this book, should make immediate 
application for copy from their division 
officers. 

So important and fundamental are 
some of the things discussed in this 
edition that it is probable that certain 
sections of it will be reproduced from 
time to time in the Employes Magazine. 



Important Instruction Books 
Issued by the Company 



THWO important instruction books 
have recently been issued by the 
JjSfKa ( 'onipany for use in the ( )perating 
idocflj Department. The first is called 
"Good Firing" — a text-book for engineers 
and firemen on locomotive management. 
It is seventy-two pages long, of con- 
venient pocket size and contains the very 
In test information on the many branches 
of the important subject of firing and 
handling locomotives. Any firemen or 
engineers who have not yet received 
copies of this book can obtain same 
from their road foreman of engines, 



Earl Stimson, Engineer Mainte- 
nance of Way, Elected Second 
Vice-President of American 
Railway Engineering 
Association 



IARL STIMSON, our engineer 
maintenance of way, has been 
elected second vice-president of 
the American Railway Engi- 
neering Association. We believe that 
this is the first time that the Baltimore 
and Ohio has had a representative made 
an official of this organization and we 
congratulate Mr. Stimson and the Asso- 
ciation upon his incumbency of this 
important office. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



47 



How Some Employes are "Doing 
Their Bit" 

TRAVELING auditor tried to 
enlist when the first call for 
recruits in the regular army was 
sounded. He was found physi- 
cally unfit, but immediately left railroad 
service, went back to the farm in the 
Middle West, donned his overalls and 
released for service in the righting line 
one of his brothers. 

Another employe in the same depart- 
ment, who has contributed some splendid 
verse to the Employes Magazine, has 
been writing for the Baltimore papers a 
series of most inspiring poems intended 
to increase patriotic fervor and stimulate 
enlistment. He also has said "God 
bless you — go do your bit" to his oldest 
son, who is under age but now serving in 
the National Guard. 

Another young man in the same 
department who has just become of age 
leaves soon to begin work on a farm in 
the South and by so doing sacrifices for 
the time being at least rosy prospects in 
railroad service. There are other ex- 
clerks from the same department now 
in the uniform of the Maryland National 
Guard. 

A half dozen young fellows in the 
service in Baltimore, all of them with 
positions paying more than they will get 
in their new life, preparing for war, have 
been accepted for the Officers' Training 
Gamp at Fort Myer, Va. 

These are but a few of the commendable 
cases we have heard of and undoubtedly 
a very few of many like them on all the 
divisions of the big System. There is 
work for every man to do. What is your 
bit going to be? 



Keyser Employes Show Their 
Patriotism 

UR employes at Keyser are a 
patriotic body of men. As a 
proof of this spirit a collection 
was taken up among the shop 
and office forces and a beautiful American 
flag, 6' x 10', was purchased. 



The shop men made a fifty foot flag 
staff, which was planted on the beautiful 
lawn (known to all Keyserites as Com- 
munity Park) between our freight and 
passenger stations. Then, on April 4, 
a public flag raising ceremony was held. 

The Boy Scouts were present, and a 
band played several patriotic airs. The 
flag was run to the peak of the staff by a 
Boy Scout and as it snapped proudly in 
the breeze six West Virginia National 
Guardsmen, who happened to be in town, 
fired a salute. A thousand or more 
people were present at the ceremony. 

The Baltimore and Ohio boys are 
proud of their gift to the community and 
stand ready to do their bit in helping- 
America and her allies win the great war 
for democracy in which we are now 
engaged. 



Flag Raising at Locust Point 

H LARGE crowd gathered at oui 
Locust Point yards on April 14 
to witness the ceremony of raising- 
Old Glory. Harry Hemerich 
pulled the cord that released the Stars 
and Stripes to the breeze, while the band 
of the Fourth Regiment, Maryland 
Infantry, played the "Star Spangled 
Banner." William H. McKay gave a 
patriotic address, which was greeted 
with cheers, especially when he expressed 
the readiness of Baltimore and Ohio men 
to answer the call of their country's need. 



A Slogan for the Food Squad 

HHE Houston Post says there are 
1,000,000 loafers in this land. 
Not loafers like the Japanese 
baker who advertised himself "the 
biggest loafer in Tokyo," but loafers who 
loaf. Some will be dragnetted into the 
army, others into other service; still 
others, if they can manage it, will con- 
tinue to loaf. For those the Post pro 
poses this national decree: "If you don't 
do your bit you don't bite!" — New York 
Herald. 






As Presented by 
the Baltimore and 
Ohio Opera Club, 
in Baltimore, on 
the Evenings of 
April 26, 27 and 
28, under the 
Auspices of the 
Welfare Bureau 



"And the night shall be 
filled with music, 
And the cares that in- 
fest the day 
Shall fold their tents like 
the Arabs, 
And silently steal 
away." 



PRACTICALLY all of those who took part 
in the three performances of " The Mikado" 
by the Baltimore and Ohio Opera Club, 
even after looking back at the long and tiring 
period of preparation, can yet subscribe to the 
sentiment expressed in the introductory verse. 
For, though the opera was a big undertaking 
for amateurs, especially in the short period of 
ten weeks, and although the rehearsals came 
frequently as the time for the first production 
drew near, by far the majority of those who 
participated would vote to do it over again if 
they had the opportunity. 

"The Mikado" is about as difficult a comic 
opera as could have been attempted. It re- 
quires a well trained chorus, a competent set 
of principals, and an elaborate setting. Our 
own production had all of these things. And 
whatever of sacrifice and fatigue and disci- 
pline was undergone, had its compensation in 



the sheer beauty of the music and the convic- 
tion after the last performance that the effort 
had been well worth while. 

It is a long cry from our own amateur pro- 
duction of this charming opera to a prison camp 
"somewhere in Germany." The place, as re- 
cently related in the New York Tribune, was 
called "Ruhleben," and the devotion of the 
Englishmen therein imprisoned to this Gilbert 
and Sullivan masterpiece was shown in this 
way: 

The camp was disease-ridden. Hundreds 
were being carried off by illness, lack of medical 
facilities and starvation. Something had to be 
done to rejuvenate the spirit of the prisoners 
and some of them who were in better condi- 
tion than their suffering comrades hit upon an 
amateur production of "The Mikado" for this 
purpose. Therefore, without the sanction, even 
if with the permission of their German guards, 



19 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




KO-KO 

Masterfully played by John T. Elliott, 
the general director of the opera 



it was given under the title of "The Makeado, 
or the Town of Lhangerpu." 

It is a long cry, we say, from Albaugh's 
Theatre in Baltimore to a German prison camp. 
Yet the same love of music and the belief in its 
inspiring and cheering qualities were responsible 
for both productions. 

If you were present on any one of the nights 
of April 26, 27 and 28, you will remember the 
beauty of the decorations in the lobby. Long 
supple bamboo poles from far-off Japan had 
been secured and on these were hung the gayest 
of paper lanterns. The poles were placed in 
every corner, the supple tops bending lightly 
against the ceiling, giving the effect of the 
most graceful arched festoons of lanterns. 
The lighting effects were also covered with 
lanterns, and the box office and center pillar 
of the lobby were lavishly embowered with 
fresh green laurel and beautiful artificial wis- 
teria, which had been made by the girls of 
the Bando Club. On the left was a long table 
covered with a snowy white cloth and draped 
with Japanese crepe most oriental in pattern. 
Attractive signs hung back of the table in- 
viting those attending the opera to come out 
between the acts and enjoy a glass of tea 
punch. Vases at either end of the table were 
stacked high with real Japanese apple blossoms 
and a huge silver punch bowl in the centre of 
the table completed the artistic invitation. 

The delicious tea punch which was served 
between the acts was made under the direction 
of John Bopp, who has charge of the employes' 
restaurant in the Baltimore and Ohio Building, 



and was served by Miss Mabel T. Gessner, vice- 
president of the Bando Club and some of her 
girl associates in the Club. Each of them wore 
a Japanese kimono of most characteristic pat- 
tern and added quaint geisha-girl touches to her 
costume to complete the Nipponese illusion. 

Other girls of the Bando Club distributed pro- 
grams. These were most attractive, printed as 
they were in wisteria purple and spring green 
colors on big sheets of hand-made deckle-edge 
Japanese paper, rolled up, diploma-fashion, and 
tied with red, white and blue paper ribbon, just 
to add a little patriotic touch. 

On either side of the entrance to the orchestra 
was a beautifully decorated crepe covered 
table on which Japanese baskets were piled. 
These were filled with delicious confections 
which were sold between the acts by the girl 
ushers, also bedecked in kimonos and other 
decorations a la Japonesque. 

The inside of the theatre realized the promise 
of the announcement of "The Mikado" made 
in the March and April issues of the Maga- 
zine.' It looked like a bit of Japan trans- 
planted. The stage boxes were flanked by fes- 
toons of Japanese lanterns on long bamboo poles, 
laurel and wisteria covered the upper tier of 
boxes in profusion and three American flags 
hung in severe simplicity from the boxes on 
either lower side. The decorations were in 
charge of Harry Welker, clerk in the agent's 
office at Camden. Mr. Welker also played the 
part of Pish-Tush in the opera and it is a toss- 
up whether he was more successful in his role 
of actor or decorator-in-chief. In the latter 




AN UNBEATABLE TRIO 
Left to right: Hood Yates as the Mikado, Benjamin II. 
Andehsen aa Nee Ban and Elna Sellman as K at i fl hfl 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



51 




THEY'RE PRETTY AS PICTURES HERE WITHOUT THEIR MAKEUP 
Imagine how attractive they were with it on. Alice Leigh as Yum-Yum in the center, Ida Ltjsby as Peep-Bo on the 
left, Elizabeth Locse as Pitti-Sing on the right 



capacity he was ably assisted by Miss Cessner, 
who, during the whole of the preparations for 
the opera was invaluable for her judgment, her 
enthusiasm and her willingness to do anything 
which could contribute to the success of the pro- 
duction. 

On the first night the Opera Club was ready 
to open the performance promptly on the dot 
of 8.15, the advertised time. But the patrons 
had just begun to arrive in force then, and it 
was 8.25 when Hobart Smock, the leader of the 
orchestra and the musical director of the opera, 
raised his baton and led his charges through 
one verse of the Star Spangled Banner. This 
was a most appropriate introduction and was 
repeated on the two succeeding nights to the 
enthusiastic approval of the audience. 

The orchestra played the long overture well 
and when the curtain was raised upon the 
chorus of Japanese noblemen (off" stage, the 
members of the Glee Club) and the beautiful 
mise-en-scene, there was a hearty outburst of 
applause. 

Just a word about the scene itself. The color 
scheme was light green, and represented the 
court yard of the residence of Ko-Ko, the Lord 
High Executioner of Titipu. The trellised en- 



trances led from either side into the back 
centre of the stage and potted plants and gar- 
lands of fresh laurel and wisteria made the 
scene most realistic. Two formal stone benches 
were placed, one on either side of the stage, 
and behind one bloomed in all its springtime 
beauty a miniature Japanese cherry blossom 
tree. An enormous Japanese parasol of gorgeous 
colors, from the limbs of which hung twenty- 
four tiny Japanese lanterns, was suspended 
directly over the centre of the stage and provid- 
ed the key note of the whole scenic scheme. 

Beautiful as was the first act picture, how- 
ever, it was far surpassed by the charming and 
delicate setting which was provided for the 
second. 

This was a lovely garden, as green and pink 
and fresh as real laurel draped in profusion 
over the most delicately painted background 
of garlanded arches and trellisses, could make 
it. The brilliant Japanese parasol had its 
tiny hanging lanterns brightly illuminated and 
in each of the seven arches was a single Japanese 
lantern. The effect was of softest moonlight 
on the garden and the picture presented by the 
daintily attired girls in the chorus grouped 
around the three little maids, with Yum-Yum 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



in the centre, preparing for her wedding cere- 
mony, will linger long in the memory. 

Limitation of space forbids an extended 
review of the play. Suffice it to say that the 
following criticism, which appeared in the 
Baltimore Evening News of April 27, the day 
after the first performance, is neither more nor 
less appreciative than the criticisms which 
were given by all the other Baltimore papers, 
without exception. 



"A crowded and enthusiastic audience 
witnessed the Gilbert and Sullivan classic 'The 
Mikado,' as given by the Baltimore and Ohio 
Opera Club at Albaugh's last night. This 
was the second venture in the same field, 
'Pinafore' having been sung by the same 
organization in November last year, and a 
more ambitious one, since the Japanese work 
was the fruit of the two famous collaborators 
when their hands as duettists had become 
expert and they had soared boldly into a new 
and difficult field. 

" 'The Mikado' is almost as hazardous as 
any musical experiment the Opera Club might 
have made, for Sir Arthur Sullivan's score 
demands resource and skill and sometimes 
reaches lofty heights. At more than one point 
he has made use of genuine Japanese themes. 
To present the opera acceptably there must be 
talented singers and performers, attractive 
and appropriate costumes and accessories 



sufficiently elaborate to establish the actual 
Nipponese atmosphere. 

"In all these respects the requirements were 
fulfilled by the club last night. It was a 
pleasure to see the stage adornments — the 
cherry blossoms, the apple tree blooms, the 
garlands of wisteria, with their light and 
charming color — and the varied and graceful 
costumes of silk, the fans and combs, the quaint 
shoes, the graceful head-dresses and the bows 
and simpers of the noblemen and the girls. 
Beautiful pictures were made as the figures 
moved through the amusing play, always to 
lovely music. Even the program was printed 
on Japanese paper, with drawings by the 
famous Hokusai. 

"The songs, the madrigals, the glees were 
remarkably well sung. Three charming little 
wards of Ko-Ko were found in Alice Leigh as 
Yum- Yum, Elizabeth Loose as Pitti-Sing and 
Ida Lusby as Peep-Bo. Miss Leigh was par- 
ticularly delightful and in the kissing duet 
with Nanki-Poo at the close of the first act 
and in the song in the garden in the second act 
won generous applause. 

"A droll Ko-Ko was John T. Elliott and a 
haughty Pooh-Bah, with his comprehensive 
responsibilities, was seen in John D. Wright. 
The disdainful Pish-Tush was Harry Welker 
and Elna Sellman created much laughter with 
her Katisha. An impressive Mikado was 
presented by Hood Yates, and the lignt and 
pleasing tenor voice of H. Herman Godfrey was 




I 111 BIO BASS DR I'M SI'FAKS KM )QT i:\TLY FOB THIS CROWD OF KM PI A) YES 
Hob art Sm'K'k , the iiiii-irnl <lirertor of the production, is in tlic buck row standing and "all dressed up" 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 




"YUM-YUM" SIGHED NANKI-POO 
And so would you if you had been in his position. Alice 
Leigh and Herman Godfrey as these sentimental lovers 



heard to advantage in the part of Nanki-Poo. 
There was a very large and well-trained chorus, 
and the music of the orchestra, under the 
direction Of Hobart Smock, was excellent." 



So much for the play as a whole, and just a 
word of thanks to several who, in addition to 
those already especially mentioned, were 
responsible, to a large extent, for the unqualified 
success of the opera. 

First to Mr. Elliott, who produced the play, 
who worked up all the stage settings, who gave 
of his time and energy with .slavish devotion 
to the perfection of an infinite number of 
details, and who did all of this cheerfully, 
optimistically and with a love for the work 
which was delightful and refreshing. 

Mr. Smock was the capable music director, 
the leader of fine command, and the friend of 
everything attempted by the Baltimore and 
Ohio Opera Club, that he always is. 

Miss Anne Henderson, the president of the 
Bando Club, worked with her usual enthusiasm, 
and with the generous reward given her by the 
splendid showing made by the girls of the 
Club. Of Miss Gessner's untiring and well 
directed efforts, all who had anything to do 
with the opera, are well aware. 

We doubt if there has ever been a trio of 
"little maids" more realistically filling the 
parts of demure and dainty Japanese school 
girls than the Yum- Yum, Pitti-Sing and Peep-Bo 
of our production, respectively sung by Alice 
Leigh, Elizabeth Loose and Ida Lusby. Their 
appearance alone was sufficient to repay one 
for going to see the opera and their vocal 
attainments and acting were surprisingly 
fine. This is especially true in view of the 



fact that no one of them had ever appeared in 
a comic opera before. 

Miss Leigh throughout seemed absolutely 
"to the manor born." She was entirely at 
ease, dainty, vivacious, attractive and stood 
the strain of the three successive performances 
extremely well. Her beautiful "Moon Song" 
was encored each night. Miss Loose acted 
with fine restraint and was a compelling picture 
in her gorgeous cerise kimono. Her sweet 
contralto voice was particularly effective in 
the lilting "For he's going to marry Yum- 
Yum." Miss Lusby was by far the most 
Japonesque of all the school girls on the stage. 
She "toddled" with all the quaintness of a 
real Nipponese and looked like a glorified 
Madame Butterfly. 

Elna Sellman, as Katisha, far surpassed her 
performance of Josephine in Pinafore. She 
threw herself into the part with the enthusiasm 
and confidence of a professional and both 
vocally and histrionically, was superb. 

Of the boys in the Glee Club, special thanks 
are due B. H. Andersen, treasurer, for his 
important part not only in the handling of the 
tickets, but also for his admirable performance 
of the idiot, sometimes known as Nee-Ban, the 
jester of the Mikado. His idiocy was irresist- 
able (that is to say, in his latter capacity). 
Ambrose T. Hardwick took care of the scores 
and other incidentals in connection with the 
opera with his accustomed earnestness. 

Hood Yates, who played the Mikado, is 
especially to be congratulated because he 
started to rehearse the part only ten days 
before the first performance on account of the 




A DELIGHTFULLY REALISTIC AND 

ATTRACTIVE COUPLE S3 3 

Ida Lusby as Peep-Bo and Harry Welker as Pish-Tush 



54 



THE BALTIMORE VXD OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




THE ROLES OF PITTI-SING AND POOH-BAH 



were splendidly sung by Elizabeth Loose 
and John D. Wright 

enforced absence from Baltimore of O. L. 
Andrews, a member of the Glee Club who had 
originally started to do this part. Mr. Yates' 
characterization of the part was simply 
splendid. 

Herman Godfrey gave the charming part of 
Xanki-Poo a carefully studied interpretation. 
His kissing scene with Miss Leigh as Yum-Yum 
was particularly successful, and in their several 
duets they showed the effect of long and careful 
training. One could hardly fail to be a devoted 
and enthusiastic lover with so charming a 
Yum-Yum as Miss Leigh. 

It was only after the most earnest solicitation 
that John D. Wright, foreman of the paint shop 
at Mount Clare, consented to sing the difficult 
role of Pooh-Bah. His natural dignity and 
magnificent baritone voice enabled him to 
give a very finished performance and, par- 
ticularly on account of his disinclination from 
a purely personal standpoint to shoulder the 
long and strenuous rehearsals and the three 
performances, he has the thanks of all his 
associates. The part of Pish-Tush was handled 
by Harry Welker, as it would have been by an 
accomplished professional. He was "in" the 
part all the time and gave it a distinguished 
reading. 

Of Mr. Elliott's playing of the great role of 
Ko-Ko it need only be said that unbiased and 
expeft critics who saw his interpretation said 
that in their memory it had never been done 

better in Baltimore. 

The officials of the Railroad supported the 
project handsomely, boxes having been sub- 
scribed to by most of them. It was a deep 
disappoint merit to the members of the Opera 
Club that some of them could not attend, but 



it was generally well known that they were 
engaged in business of the greatest importance 
at the time the performances were being 
given. 

Flowers in profusion were handed across the 
footlights on all the three nights. Beautiful 
roses were sent to all of the girl principals and 
to Miss Henderson and Miss Gessner, the 
president and vice-president, respectively, of 
the Bando Club, by the Baltimore and Ohio 
Glee Club. Flowers were also received from 
the Welfare Bureau and among others from 
vice-president and Mrs. A. W. Thompson. 

It was particularly gratifying to the members 
of the Club to know that the audience on 
Thursday night, composed principally of the 
friends of the Children's Hospital School, was 
a good one, and went away feeling that they 
had gotten their money's worth. It looks 
now as if between six hundred and one thousand 
dollars would be realized for the Children's 
Hospital School and that a sum slightly less 
than this will be realized for distribution by 
the Opera Club. 

To all who participated directly or indirectly 
in the Opera and to the thousands of friends 
who supported it by their encouragement and 
financial assistance, the sincere thanks of the 
Opera Club are extended. 



To the Rescue 

WITH the eastern seaboard threatened by 
U-boats, the west is contributing its 
'strength' to fortify the guardians of the 
coast with new courage and to stimulate en- 
listment," remarks one of our traffic officials, 
who reports that recently a solid train, loaded 
with wealth almost rivaling the war loan left 
St. Louis on its way East. 'Through the 
little towns that dot the right-of-way, house- 
wives leaned from windows or stood in door- 
ways and, catching the scent once so familiar, 
collapsed. Some there were, braver and less 
weak than their sisters, who rushed to catch 
the flying 'mint,' as it sped on its way. At 
terminals where crews were changed dis- 
patchers whispered their orders to the men, 
telling them of their precious charge and 
special instructions were given to exert the 
utmost care in handling the train. The engine- 
men hearing, looked frightened, then mys- 
terious, but gradually grew calm, as good rail- 
roaders will when they have an important task 
to perform, and buckled down to their duties 
Telegraph wires carried the golden secret to 
the lone signalmen in their towers, presaging 
t he approach of the train. Wherever it stopped 
curious crowds gathered and looked with awe 
upon the miracle that had visited them. At 
the many 'somewheres in America' where 
national guardsmen are protecting the bridges, 
tunnels and stretches of the right-of-way, 
soldieis saluted the lucky crew as a signal 
mark of honor to their new responsibility— a 
tins! confided in few men that of bringing 
safely to the east a solid trainload of thirty- 
six cars of Onions."— ./. //. Baunigartner. 



^f^CIAIy MERIT R,OIvLv 



Martinsburg Shops 

On April 10 engineer Charles Grosinger, 
engine 1830, observed indications of a damaged 
car in train ahead. On reaching Hancock he 
notified the operator, who had the train in 
question inspected at Sir John's Run. The 
defective car was discovered and set off. 
Engineer Grosinger is commended for his 
watchfulness and prompt action. 

Monongah Division 

On March 25 conductor F. J. Merrifield 
found a defective track condition in cut east 
of Lumberport, and, together with conductor 
A. H. Strong, made temporary repairs. They 
notified trains that were being met at Bloom, 
and also the train dispatcher, so that trains 
could pass safely. 



Wheeling Division 

On the night of April 3, Wheeling freight 
house watchman Guy discovered a fire under 
the platform of the W. A. Wilson Co., wholesale 
paint and building supply dealers, whose build- 
ing is across the street from our freight house. 
With the aid of clerks Davis and Forge y he ex- 
tinguished the fire by the use of fire extinguishers, 
which are kept in the freight house. His 
prompt action no doubt prevented a serious fire. 

On the afternoon of March 27 conductor 
E. D. Luke discovered a defective track con- 
dition in Schramm's Siding. A credit entry 
has been placed on his service record. 

On the evening of April 13, while 2-85 was 
approaching Wheeling passenger station, sec- 
tion foreman William Lemley discovered a 



Special Service Rendered by Cumberland Division Operators 
During Month of March 



Date 



Name 



Location 



Irregularity Noted 



March 1 . . 
March 1 . . 
March 1 . 
March 1 . 
March 2 . 
March 5 . 
March 7 . 
March 9. 
March 10. 
March 10. 
March 11 . 
March 12 . 
March 12. 
March 12. 
March 13 . 
March 14. 
March 14 . 
March 15. 
March 17 . 
March 20 . 
March 21 . 
March 21 . 
March 21 . 
March 24 . 
March 24 . 
March 25 . 
March 31 . 



W. R. Cogley Oakland 

Q. Hobbs Hobbs 

J. L. Schroder Hobbs. 

C. L. Kesecker Martinsburg 

C. L. Kesecker ' Martinsburg 

H. H. Chambers I Engles 

J. L. Schroder Martinsburg 

H. C. Rhoades Magnolia 

O. J. Rash I Hancock 

S. E. Schroder Hancock 

J. L. Schroder Martinsburg 

C. E. Ott | Rodemer 

C. E. Ott j Seymour's 

S. E. Schroder | Hancock 

C. C. DeHaven | Viaduct Junction 

O. J. Rash Hancock 

S. E. Schroder Hancock 

E. O. Fouch Mountain Lake. . 



S. E. Schroder 

S. E. Schroder 

G. W. Kaylor 

H. C. Rhoades 

C. W. Michael 

O. J. Rash 

J. B. Adams 

J. R. Murphy I Oakland 

Q. Hobbs I Hobbs.. 



Hancock. . . 
Hancock. . . 
Rawlings . . 
Magnolia. . 
Terra Alta. 
Hancock. . . 
Hancock. . . 



Equipment. 
Equipment. 
Equipment. 

Contents of carnot secure. 

Equipment. 

Track condition. 

Equipment. 

Equipment. 

Car door bulged. 

Equipment. 

Equipment. 

Track condition. 

Track condition. 

Equipment. 

Protecting persons. 

Equipment. 

Equipment . 

Shifted load. 

Equipment. 

Equipment . 

Equipment. 

Bulged door. 

Shifted load. 

Equipment . 

Equipment. 

Projection from car. 

Equipment. 



55 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



defective condition on our car 165701 and im- 
mediately took necessary action to prevent 
accident. 

Switchtender G. L. Bisett discovered a 
defective condition of equipment on extra 
east 2204, while passing through Benwood 
yard recently. He succeeded in having train 
stopped and the condition was remedied. 

Operator F. Shivlin has been commended for 
his discovery of a defective condition of equip- 
ment on a car in train of extra west engine 2647, 
while passing DK Tower. He immediately 
reported the matter to the conductor. 

Mr. C. C. Schlosser, an employe of the 
Central Glass Company, while returning from 
work, discovered and reported a defective 
switch condition just west of Sixteenth Street. 
Superintendent Haver has written to Mr. 
Schlosser, thanking him for his action. 

Cleveland Division 

On April 7 C. E. Woods, operator at Seville, 
Ohio, noticed a defective condition on a car in 
a passing train and 
promptly notified 
the crew, so that re- 
pairs could be made. 
Mr. Woods, who is 
the youngest man in 
our telegraphic ser- 
vice, is commended 
for his prompt 
action. 

On April 10 G. W. 
Eaton, agent at 
Boston Mill, Ohio, 
earned a credit 
entry on his service 
record by discovering a defective track con- 
dition near his station. 

Newark Division 

Superintendent Stevens has written to Mr. 
Roy L. Helms and Mr. John Weekly, residents 
of Slewartsville, Ohio, thanking them for 
services rendered the Company on March 24. 
They discovered a landslide just west of NPeffs, 

Ohio, and flagged train No. 70. 

Pittsburgh Division 

On the evening of April 1 Mr. Henry Singer, 
of Epton, Pa., discovered a fire on our bridge 




C. E. WOODS 



101. He stopped train No. 34 and notified 
the crew of his rinding. Mr. Singer's prompt 
action and cooperative interest on this occasion 
is gratifying to us and we wish to thank him. 

On April 14, while flagging ahead to protect 
movement of train No. 164 at Versailles, 
baggagemaster B. L. Matthews discovered a 
car door lying on westward main track. He 
removed it. 

John Picket, Wells Fargo agent at Washing- 
ton, Pa., on March 21 heard an unusual noise 
when train No. 35 was moving over the crossing. 
He made an examination and found one of the 
planks loose. He at once made repairs. 

We want to express our appreciation of his 
splendid cooperation. 

New Castle Division 

On March 14 H. D. Carnes, lampman at FS 
Tower, near Ravenna, O., discovered a con- 
dition which he immediately reported and had 
remedied. 

On April 7 train No. 7 had a knuckle break 
on baggage car at Ravenna. Conductors J. E. 
Crill and C. S. Reed, who were deadheading, 
rendered valuable assistance in cutting the 
car out and getting the train moving with the 
least possible delay. 

Ohio Division 

A Correction 

In the April issue, through an error, con- 
ductor Sutton was given credit for discovering 
an obstruction on the main track near Madeira. 
The gentleman to whom the credit should 
have been given was brakeman Edward Tierney. 

Operators A. J. Saunier and R. K. Hall have 
been commended for observing and reporting 
defective conditions on passing freight trains. 

Indiana Division 

On March 16 Samuel Hodapp, car inspector 
at Seymour, observed a defective condition of 
equipment on car in train of extra east 2625. 
He called the agent at Ft. Ritner on the tele- 
phone and asked him to call Mcdora and stop 
the train. This was done and repairs made by 
the crew. A credit entry has been placed on 
Mr. Hodapp' s service record. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



57 



When train No. 12 had trouble near Nebo 
on March 5, engineer E. R. Day and conductor 
Fori Cox, who we're deadheading from Sey- 
mour, greatly assisted in the work of expediting 
the movement of the train. 

Passenger brakeman Edward Sherber, while 
deadheading on train No. 56 on March 21, 
observed a defective condition on the engine. 
He had the train stopped and repairs were 
made. 

On April 1 operator R. O. Huntington dis- 
covered a defective track condition near Osgood 
and flagged extra east No. 891-2664. He also 
reported the matter so that repairs could be 
made. A credit entry has been placed on his 
service record. 

While brakeman Frederick Artman was 
flagging at Milan on April 7, he noticed a de- 
fective condition of equipment on a car in a 
passing freight train. He attracted the atten- 
tion of the crew and repairs were made. He 
is commended. 



At Rivervale, on March 13, operator Sanders 
noticed a defective condition of equipment 
on P. R. R. 18246, in extra east 2769, and noti- 
fied the conductor. 

Cincinnati Terminals 

A credit entry has been placed on the service 
record of N. G. Haering, switchtender at 
8th Street, for cutting air hose on train of 
Big Four engine 7377 on March 25, when cars 
in train were derailed. It is probable that 
Mr. Haering' s prompt action saved the Com- 
pany considerable track damage. 

On March 25 C. H. Christopher, operator at 
Ivorydale Junction, found a defective con- 
dition in interlocking plant at that point. He 
remedied the condition. A credit entry has 
been placed on his service record. 

On March 28 switchman J. Nolan discovered 
a defective track condition near RH Tower. 
A credit entry has been placed on his service 
record. 



Principal Items of Expense in Train Service 

(Exclusive of the Expense of Storehouse Labor in Handling) 



Hit. I "« t il ii' I 



Item Cost 

Lantern frames $ .65 

White globes 16 

Red globes 59 

Fusees 5" 11 

Torpedoes 014 

Monkey wrenches 12" 68 

Monkey wrenches 18" 1 .20 

Stilson wrenches 18" 98 

Signal flags 09 

Brooms (engine) 41 

Brooms (trainmen) 44 

Hammers 22 

Cold chisels 9" 15 

Tail marker lamps (engine) . 5.42 
Tail marker lamps (train). . 5.94 



Item Cost 

Scoop shovels $ .52 

Engineman torches 42 

Long spout oil cans 63 

Coal picks 22 

Engine water coolers 2.80 

Air hose 1.14 

Air hose gaskets 01 25 

Gas stick 2.90 

1 J^" square nut 05 

1 3^2" brass screw — gross. . . .70 
Caboose end door lock. ... 1 .25 

Car chain 4.70 

Emergency knuckle 4.50 

Car replacers 1 6.48 



! ^ \ AMONG OURSELVES j j 

1 ! 1 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Auditor Freight Claims' Office 

Correspondent, H. Irving Martin 

The pages of the Employes Magazine have 
from time to time disclosed the presence of 
poets of no mean order among those whose 
names appear on the payrolls of the Company. 

The drumbeat of the nation, sounded in our 
ears so recently, may call to the colors from the 
ranks of railroad operatives and railroad 
clerks some one who may rank as a Funston. 
It is not at all improbable that the business 
training and the possession of the art of man- 
aging men and affairs may make some Balti- 
more and Ohio man stand among his fellows as 
a star of the first magnitude. 

We have not forgotten that J. C. McMahon, 
a Baltimore and Ohio yardmaster, untangled 
the disordered yards at Tampa during the 
Spanish-American War and brought order out 
of chaos. 

^ It may be the lot of some of those from the 
Freight Claim Department who have offered 
their services to the Government to perform 
some act which will entitle them to honorable 
mention and grateful remembrance. Possibly 
we have worked shoulder to shoulder with a 
Hobson, a Bagby, or a Rowan, chosen to "carry 
a message to Garcia." 

Our wishes for honorable and meritorious 
service go with Charles Ruzicka, whose name 
is enrolled as a yeoman on the "Fish Hawk," 



of the Naval Reserve; and with Herbert A. 
Brown, now with the Coast Artillery at Fort 
Slocum, near New Rochelle, New York. 

Napoleon said that "an army moves on its 
belly." The soldier whose stomach is empty 
has no heart to fight. It is necessary that army 
supplies be moved according to regulations and 
proper freight rates. 

It is essential that accounts be kept and 
railway rates on Government material be 
checked and we are glad to contribute our rate 
clerk, H. H. Godfrey, to the Quartermaster 
General's Department. "H. H. G." in this 
instance will stand for service, not for goods. 

Our baseball team can hit the ball, and we are 
glad to record their victory over the Mount 
Saint Joseph's High School team on March 24. 
The score of five to three was piled up in two 
innings, when each team seemed to let up a 
little. The remaining innings were stubbornly 
contested by the opposing batteries. 

The Freight Claim Department line-up was: 
Heinz, Brubaker, Chaney, Kemp, Gannon, 
Fink, Pope, Ittner', and Goeller. 

On April 14 our team failed to realize the 
value of their daily environment to the Mc- 
Cormick spice team. We assume that the 
absorption by the team of "pep" and "ginger" 
from the shelves of the McCormick warehouses 
gave that team a working advantage which 
resulted in their grabbing up the honors by the 
tally of seven to four. 

But the best is to come. The Claim Depart- 
ment Club, by dint of practice and hard work, 
will hold the game in their own hands on many 
future Saturdays. 



59 



60 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, J. Limpert 

Never was there a more disappointed lot of 
people than the employes of this office when a 
certain party by the name of J. Pluvius horned 
in on our Good Friday ball game. The stage 
had been all set for a hot contest and everybody 
tuned up for the fray, when old J. P. got 
in his dirty work. The rain of the night before 
left the grounds soggy and the weather better 
suited for football than baseball. The hardest 
part of the whole affair was that the Married 
Men had already counted the game as won, 
and had it all doped out how they were going 
to make "Jimmy" do a "Hindenburg" to the 
showers. However, such things will happen, 
and, when it was found impossible to play the 
game, those who had the courage to venture 
out to the grounds were invited to a luncheon, 
served by the committee in charge, at the 
Westport Country Club, and, according to all 
reports, said luncheon was of the "A La Emer- 
son" order, or in plain English, a bang-up affair. 

It is to be hoped that later in the season the 
spirit may move the players of the Married and 
Single Men's teams to get together and decide 
this year's champs. 

Hugh C. Carter has been called to the colors 
and is serving in the Fourth Regiment. 

Is there anything more provoking than to 
have one's brand new straw hat fly off and go 
splashing around in the mud? Neither does our 
Lula. 

Anditor Passenger Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, George Eichner 

A patriotic spirit fills the office and as the 
result the Star Spangled Banner floats over 
every desk. As a token of the esteem in which 
the men of the train earnings and statistical 
bureaus hold their chief clerk, L. M. Grice, 
they took occasion on March 21 to present to 
him an American flag, enameled on gold, for 
wear in the bottonhole. 

C. St. Elmo Grice, a special apprentice at 
Mount Clare Shops and son of our chief clerk, 
has proved his patriotism by enlisting in 
Company G; Fifth Regiment, Maryland 
National Guard. 

Willing to do "their bit" ten men answered 
the call to the colon and have enrolled them- 
selves in the "Guarding Family" of Uncle Sam. 
E. B. Alrich answers roll call as a member of 
the Maryland Naval Militia, and Henry J. 
Burns and Frank Lyons have joined the blue- 
jackets as yeoman and seaman, respectively. 
Leo Duriphy, of Company I, and Lamar Norris, 
of Company K, reported when t he Fifth Regi- 
ment,, M. N. G., was called into service. 

Feeling the desire to don the khaki, Edward 
Boy lan, Charles Crewe, and Charles Myers 

selected Company M as their favorite, while 
Harry Phillips chose Company E of the Fifth 
Regiment, and Le Hoy Fanknahel joined the 



Hospital Corps of the Fourth Regiment. 
Although the loss of their services is keenly 
felt, their fellow clerks congratulate them on 
their stand. 

The annual ball game between the statistical 
and train earnings bureaus took place on 
March 31 at Clifton Park. Much to the 
surprise of everyone the game resulted in a hot 
battle and the train earners forced the statis- 
ticians to the limit before they submitted to a 
10 to 9 defeat. The winning run was scored in 
the seventh inning, when Schmidt had doubled 
and Owens came through with a timely single. 
The fielding and hitting of both sides was 
good. Schmidt and Cady led with the stick, 
while Hooper's superhuman catch in center 
featured the fielding. Hohman and Travers 
rendered decisions like veteran umpires. The 
lineup: Statistical Department — Zimmerman, 
Geraghty, Hock, Boylan, Eichner, Schmidt, 
Germershausen, Owings, Fankhanel. Train 
Earnings Department — Cobb, Lyons, Stephens, 
Cady, Lynch, Hooper, Seems, Jeffries, Alrich, 
Phillips. 

Auditor of Revenue — Miscellaneous Division 

Correspondent, Miss Reba Baron 

The friends and associates of C. H. Hann 
were saddend by news of his death on April 30. 

Mr. Hann had been absent from duty only 
eight days and his death was a great shock. 
He had been in the service for over ten years 
and had made numerous friends in the Building, 
who will greatly miss him. 

His fellow employes extend their sympathy 
to his wife and parents. 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, Fred. B. Kohler, Clerk 
Pier 22 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, 26th Street 

V. R. Cherney Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

A. L. Michelson Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

F. W. Nolan Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

H. R. Tait Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wallabout 

Marine Department Members 
Permanent 

E. A. English Maiine Supervisor, Chairman 

E. I Kelly Assistant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 

E. Salisbury Lighterage Supervisor 

Rotating Members (appointed for three months) 

C. H. Kearney Tugboat Captain 

W. Corn eli Tugboat Engineer 

\Y Meade Tugboat Fireman 

M. Y. Gnorf Lighterage Kunner 

E. Sodkhkhg Barge Captain 

( >no OtttM Gas Hoist Captain 

II I'ktkhkon Steam Hoist Captain 

.1 HaLI Steiun Hoist Engineer 

\\ \i.ii;it Kelly Deckhand 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 




"A. M." TRYING HIS HAND AT DICTATION: 
"Referring to your favor — er — er — beg to advise — er — er — " 
Attention is called to "A's" chest 



The employes of the New York properties 
want to take this opportunity to thank the 
management for the lecture and motion picture 
play given at Pier 22 on April 12. E. R. 
Scoville, chief of the Safety First Bureau, told 
of the work the Company is doing in educating 
employes in safe methods and the Safety 
picture, "The House That Jack Built," and 
other movies were shown. There were about 
125 employes, clerks and dock employes, present, 
and every man left feeling a renewed interest in 
the vital subject of Safety. 

B. Schuler, westbound rate clerk at Pier 22, 
has entered the state of matrimony. He looks 
very happy, and has the hearty congratulations 
of his fellow employes. 

The lesson to employes, regarding safety, 
contained in the motion picture "The House 
that Jack Built," must perforce carry home 
the message and lesson it is intended to convey 
better than would a lecture or pamphlet. A 
picture speaks in all tongues, and there were 
many languages and dialects represented in the 
crowd that was entertained in our heated 
fruit-room at the end of Pier 22, on the evening 
of April 12. 

A picture also has the advantage of present- 
ing ready-made to a mind deficient in imagina- 
tion something that it could not construct. 

The show was thoroughly enjoyed by an 
audience of about 200. The attendance would 
have been much larger if the hour had been 
earlier than 8 p. m., as most of the employes 
live at a distance that would not allow them 
to go home for supper and return in time. 

We who had the opportunity of attending 
wish to thank the management. 

Fred Pysner, known as the "Pride of Park 
Ridge," N. J., is contemplating moving to 
Tarrytown, N. Y., in order to execute commis- 
sions and do shopping for his intended mother- 
in-law, who lives there. Fred runs up to 
Tarrytown every Saturday night now, and 
carries a bag (contents unknown). 



Frank Santagata, before mentioned in this 
Magazine, admits that his full name is 
Diminuto Carminio Francisco Santagata. 
There is both truth and poetry in this, shall 
we say, NAME. 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, R. Groeling, Chief Clerk 
Clifton, S. I. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanlin Chairman, Superintendent 

B. F. Kelly Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

S. A. Turvey... .Secretary, Trainmaster's and Marine Clerk 

H. W. Ordemax Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

A.J. Conley Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. DeReyere Medical Examiner 

J. B. Sharp Agent, St. George Coal Piers 

F. W. Nolan Agent, St. George Transfer 

P. A. YYitherspoox Track Supervisor 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

J. F. McGowan Division Operator 

W. E. Coxxell Supervisor of Crossing Watchmen 

F. Petersox Division Agent 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members 

J. P. Miller Towerman 

T. F. Brennen Conductor 

G. McKixxox Machinist 

Harry Barry Foreman Painter 

A. L. Cummiskey Car Inspector 

Alvix Rauscher Transitman 

G. Hartmax Engineer 

A. Nichols Fireman 

Joseph McDonald Signal Repairman 

H. Owens Trainman 

B. F. Win ANT Agent, Port Richmond 

G. B. Stansbury Investigator, Representing Track Dep't 




One that will stay put? As it is, we girls have an awful 
time adjusting it 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




T. J. O. is beginning to feel natural, now that 
the winter has gone. 

F. G. N. had better keep away from the Crab- 
tree Building. 



ENGINE No. 29 AND— 

From left to right — Trainman Joseph Romer, Freight 
Clerk Henry Koenig, Car Locator John J. Tobin, 
Engineer Jerry O'Brien, Clerk John Copeland and 
Float Clerk Michael Cox 

On April 1 Reinhard Groelingwas appointed 
division accountant of the Staten Island Lines, 
with offices in the Crabtree Building, St. 
George. 

Mr. Groeling was formerly chief clerk in the 
mechanical department at Clifton, a position 
which he held for ten years. He entered the 
employ of the Staten Island Lines on March 27, 
1902, as clerk to the storekeeper. In July, 1904, 
he was promoted to clerk in the vice-president's 
office, and in October, 1905, was made secretary 
to the general traffic agent, a position which he 
held until March, 1906, when he was made chief 
clerk in the Mechanical Department. 

Mr. Groeling's promotion is well merited 
and the good wishes of his many friends are 
extended. 

W. J. McNeill, formerly C. T. accountant 
in the general manager's office, has been made 
chief clerk to the division accountant. 

R. E. Guth, recently secretary to the division 
engineer, has been promoted to secretary to 
the trainmaster. 

E. W. Wennstrom, recently stenographer and 
clerk in the Stores Department, has been pro- 
moted to the position of secretary to the divi- 
sion engineer. 

The new division accountant has taken two 
good boys away from the superintendent's 
office ('. P. Phipps and C. H. Anderson. We 
won't be hearing of that "Southern town" of 
Phipps' any more. C. A. Wilson has been pro- 
moted to fill Mr. Anderson's position. 

W. L. McLoughlin, who began his career 
with this Company at Locust Point, and Later 

Came to New York as stenographer in the 

Lighterage Department, is now secretary to 
the superintendent. We wish you all kinds of 
Luck i/i your new job, old boy. 

J. V. Costello is a newcomer with us. He is 
stenographer in the superintendent's office, 

and sure is making good. Keep it up. 

We wonder why all the boys hang ;i round 

( leorge Cobb when he is at the Club? 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondent, J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

8. T. Cantrell Chairman, .Superintendent 

W. T. R. Hoddinott Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

G. F. Eberly Division Engineer 

.1. P. Hines Master Mechanic 

H. K. Hartman Chief Train Dispatcher 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

F. J. Young Captain of Police 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

B. S. Daniels Road Engineer 

Hood Simpson Road Fireman 

W. T. Marvel Road Conductor 

J. C. Williams Yard Conductor 

W. A. Tang ye Coppersmith, Shopman 

Edward Marker Car Builder, Repair Yardman 

R. C. Acton Secretary 

Philadelphia Ticket Office 

On April 23 our new passenger and ticket 
office, in the Liberty Building, 1341 Chestnut 
Street, Philadelphia, was opened and the office 
at 834 Chestnut Street discontinued. 

Our first Philadelphia ticket office was 
opened shortly after the Baltimore and Ohio 
entered Philadelphia, in the old Girard House 
833 Chestnut Street. This office was occupied 
until the evening of December 31, 1898, when it 
was discontinued. On January 2, 1899, the new 




E.' A, SANDS, DIVISION ACCOUNTANT 
Member <»t the Philadelphia Divilion Athletic Committee 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 



office, in the Continental Hotel, was opened, 
and was occupied until the recent change. 

Our first district passenger agent in Phila- 
delphia was an Englishman, Captain C. R. V. 
MacKenzie, who w T as a friend of several former 
officials of our, road, including Messrs. Garrett 
and C. K. Lord. Captain MacKenzie remained 
until the spring of 1892, when he was suceeded 
by James Potter. Mr. Potter resigned on 
December 1, 1899, to enter the newspaper busi- 
ness, becoming business and advertising mana- 
ger of the Philadelphia Evening Telegram. 
His place was taken by Bernard Ashby, who 
remained until the end of 1915. He was suc- 
ceeded by R. C. Haase, the present district 
passenger agent. 

The Continental Hotel, in which the old office 
was located, was at one time considered the 
finest hotel in the United States. Nearly every 
prominent traveler who visited Philadelphia, 
including nearly all the Presidents of the United 
States and the Prince of Wales, stopped there. 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B.Mori ARiTY. SuperinU nth nt's 
Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. B. Gorsuch Chairman, Superintendent 

R. A. Grammes. . . . Vice-Chairman. Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Brunswick 

G. H. Winslow Secretary, Washington 

Belief Department 

E. H. Mathers, M. D . Medical Examiner, Camden Station 

J. A. Robb, M. D Medical Examiner, Washington 

J. F. Ward, M. D Medical Examiner, Winchester 

Transportation Department 

R. B. Banks Division Claim Agent, Baltimore 

J. M. Powell Captain of Police, Camden Station 

S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick 

C. A. Mewshaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J.J. McCabe. Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Agent, Brunswick 

W. E. Neilson Agent, Camden Station 

J. W. Lugenbeel Freight Conductor, Riverside 

T. B. Stringer Freight Engineer, Riverside 

A. B. McGiechie Passenger Fireman, Riverside 

G. Lay Yard Conductor, Camden Yard 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

C. A. Waskey Supervisor, Washington Junction 

E. D. Calvert Supervisor, Winchester, Va. 

R. A. Porter Section Foreman, Marriottsville 

R. A. Leach Leading Carpenter, Camden Station 

W. H. Hobbs Signal Repairman, Washington Junction 

Motive Power Department 

T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Williamson General Car Foieman, Baileys 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

L. E. Stille Foreman Aii Brakes, Riverside 

M. L. Hoffmaster Assistant Car Foreman, Brunswick 

R. E. Sigafoose Clerk to General Foreman, Brunswick 

T. Shakespeare Gang Foreman, Locust Point 

J. G. Dahlem Clerk to Car Foreman, Baileys 



There will be a flag raising in the Locust 
Point yards at four o'clock on the afternoon 
of May 30 (Memorial Day). A garden has 
been started near the vard office and over it 
will float Old Glory. 

The Mount Clare band will play and there 
will be several, speakers, all of whom spoke 
at the flag raising at Locust Point in the stir- 
ring days of 1898. Among them will be the 
Rev. J. Wynne Jones, pastor of the Highland- 
town Presbyterian Church, State's Attorney 
Broening, E. B. Bailey, of Washington, former 
secretary of the Riverside Y. M. C. A., and 
engineer W. A. Cox. Thomas McXulty will 
sing ''The Star Spangled Banner." Mi.ss 
Dorris N. Harne, whose mother unfurled the 
flag in 1898, will perform the same ceremony 
this year. All employes are invited to attend. 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretary 
Y. M. C. A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



G. H. Winslow Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. P. H. Steltz Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 

Motive Power Department 

G. W. Kiehm Air Brake Supervisor 

W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C. J. Ayers Gang Leader 

A. F. Kreglow Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

G. F. Mergell Foreman of Electricians 

J. J. Desmond Gang Leader 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Hendrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

J. McCauley Assistant Yardmaster 

L. T. Keane Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance of Way Department 
W. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpentei Shop 

A. M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richman Signal Maintainer 

H. R. Callahan Signal Foreman 



Nearly three hundred persons attended the 
entertainment which was given in the asso- 
ciation rooms on April 11. An interesting and 
edifying program was rendered by Mrs. Evelyn 
Gurley-Kane and the Terminal Railroad 
Y. M. C. A. Orchestra, C. W. Guest, director. 
Mrs. Kane read Justin McCarthy's play 
"If I Were King." It was a new departure for 
us in the way of entertainment and was much 
appreciated by the audience. 

We extend our heartiest congratulations to 
two of our members who have moved up 
another rung on the ladder of success. T. M. 
Thompson, formerly secretary to the superin- 
tendent of the Washington Terminal Company, 
has accepted a position of responsibility with 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company, 



04 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE ] J 



in the office of the traffic vice-president. Mr. 
Thompson, through hard work and fidelity, 
has climbed from a lowly position to one of 
trust and responsibility and we wish him great 
success in his new field. 

The other member to whom we extend our 
good wishes is J. A. Shanahan, who has recently 
been promoted from hostler to engine dis- 
patcher. This promotion also is the result of 
long and faithful service with the Washington 
Terminal Company. 

It gives us great pleasure to say that our 
members are among those in the front rank of 
the men who give themselves to their country in 
this time of war. when strong, sturdy and loyal 
men are needed. Among the latest to join the 
colors are P. J. Carr, who has entered the 
aviation section of the Officers' Reserve Corps, 
and Joseph F. Crowley, who has enlisted as a 
yeoman in the Navy. We know that these men 
will give a good account of themselves. 

The Terminal Railroad Y. M. C. A. Baseball 
League has opened its season. A forty-eight 
game schedule in two sections has been agreed 
upon. Present indications are favorable for a 
good season. The athletic field and tennis 
courts will be put in the best possible condition. 

The ten game bowling tournament, which 
was held from March 19 to 31 inclusive, was 
productive of much friendly competition 
among the men. The results were something 
of a surprise. Edward Weiss got first place 
by knocking down 1,156 pins, "Ben" Williamson 
was second with a score of 1,143, and J. P. 
Mulroe third, having spilled 1,141 of the 
maple sticks. The men received prizes. 
Twenty-six men competed. 

The second round of the billiard tournament 
was completed when Frank Stanley defeated 
II. A. Dabney 100 — 47. Drawings for the 
third round resulted in the following pairings; 
Stanley vs. Fonda, Smith vs. Canning. 

The following team has been entered in the 
Duck Pin Bowling Tournament held under the 
auspices of the Washington City Duck Pin 
Association, beginning April 30: C. L. Williams, 
W. F. Graves, W. A. Strieter, P. W. Trotter, 
Frank Stanley and J. P. Mulroe. 

Thomas Franklin Foltz, electrical engineer 
of the Washington Terminal Company and 
chairman of our physical department com- 
mittee, has resigned to accept a position as 
mechanical engineer in the State Department of 
Labor and Industry at Harrisburg, Pa. While 
we deeply regret the loss of a good friend and 
fellow-worker we are glad that he is making 
such fine progress in his profession. 

Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Mokcjan, Secretary 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

L. Finnan pbairnMSi SoperinteacUnl of Shops 

.1. McDokougb Vice-Chairmaa, Aw't Sup'tof shops 

W. L. Moboam Secretory, Sec'y to Sup't of Shops 




GRACE GILLIS 



H. A. Beaumont General Car Foreman 

J. Howe General Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

A. E. Bobbett Shop Hand, Erecting Shop 

B. F. Weber Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 

Wilford Davis Machinist, No. 1 Machine Shop 

E. C. Riland Machinist, No. 2 Machine Shop 

C. N. Southcomb Tinner, Tin and Pipe Shop 

M. Gahan Coremaker, Foundries and Re-rolling Mill 

S. Romanov. . Blacksmith, Blacksmith Shop and Flue Plant 
W. Schmoll Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

F. C. Wood Machinist, Air Brake Shop 

C. W. Hoke Pattern Maker, Pattern Shop 

A. G. Riggins. . . .Machine Operator Helper, Steel Car 

Plant and No. 3 Machine Shop 

C. W. Armiger Tender Repairman, Tender and 

Tender Paint Shops 

M. Kelly Machine Operator, Axle Shop and 

Power Plant 

Thos. P. Griffin Assistant Foreman, Freight Car Track 

A. R. King.> Passenger Car Builder, Passenger 

Car Erecting Shop 

J. E. Tatum Pipe Fitter, Passenger Car Paint, 

Finishing and Upholstering Shops 

Chas. Wilhelm Mill Machine Hand, Saw Mill and 

Cabinet Shops 

H. Latjman Shipping Clerk, Storehouse 



The Mount Clare employes have had the 
honor of raising "Old Glory" on six memorable 
occasions recently. The wonderful patriotic 
spirit manifested by all those attending these 
affairs and the large crowds present, are evi- 
dences of the great loyalty of our men to their 
country and to the nation's head. 

On Monday noon, April 2, a great demonstra- 
tion of patriotism was given by the employes 
of the pipe, tin, tender and tender paint shops. 
The Mount Clare band started the ceremonies 
in its usual delightful manner. The invoca- 
tion was pronounced by T. E. Stacy, of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Y. M. C. A., and after a 
few introductory remarks by A. Gillis, foreman 
of the pipe and t in shop, John Hair gave a very 
interesting talk on "Our Flag." "To the 
Colors" was then sounded by Mr. Stacy on 
the cornet, whereupon the band struck up the 
"Star Spangled Banner" and "Old Glory" 
was unfurled, amid cheers and a volley fifed 
by ;i squad of t he Boys' Brigade, led by Captain 
Miles. The Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club 
then sang. The accompanying picture is of 
little Grace Gillis, the daughter of foreman 

Gillis, who acted as sponsor to the flag. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



(35 



The employes of the erecting shop at Mount 
Clare held a flag raising on Saturday afternoon, 
April 21, which was well attended. Quite a 
number of distinguished speakers graced the 
occasion, including the Honorable James H. 
Preston, Mayor of Baltimore, Robert E. Lee, 
a city official, and J. O'Hara, city councilman. 
The boys from St. Mary's Academy furnished 
the music for the occasion, and they deserve 
a great deal of credit for their part of the 
program. The committee in charge of the 
affair are to be complimented for the manner 
in which the affair was conducted. The 
decorations for the occasion were very attrac- 
tive. The addresses were more than enjoyed 
by those present, and the patriotic spirit of 
the employes was manifested in many ways. 

The employes of the stores department at 
Mount Clare held a flag raising on April 16. 
It was largely attended, and was an impressive 
affair. Good taste was displayed in the matter 
of decorations, and the committee in charge 



deserve much credit for the affair. The pro- 
gram follows: 

Selection by Mount Clare band, "On the 
Square;" invocation, the Rev. Wagner; intro- 
ductory address, J. R. Orndorff ; address, Col. J. 
H. Cudlipp; cornet solo, "National Airs," 
Miss Helena Peat; address, J. R. Orndorff; 
cornet solo, "The Rosary," Edward McCarthy; 
address, "Our Country," the Rev. Wagner; vocal 
solo, "The Stars and Stripes is his Emblem," 
Miss Laura C. Hall; selection by Mount Clare 
band, "The Star Spangled Banner." 

The flag was unfurled by Miss Frances 
Elizabeth Johnson, daughter of F. E. Johnson, 
storekeeper. 

Effective April 16 W\ A. Whalen was pro- 
moted to the position of chief clerk in the office 
of the superintendent of shops, vice J. E. Webb, 
assigned to other duties. C. W. Serp was also 
transferred from the office of the general master 
mechanic, to fill the position of assistant to 
Mr. Whalen. 





ENTHUSIASTIC EMPLOYES GATHERED BEFORE TIN SHOP AT MOUNT CLARE 
TO SEE "OLD GLORY" HOISTED TO THE BREEZE 



66 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



On Saturday afternoon, April 7, a memorable 
flag raising was held by employes of the freight 
car track at Mount Clare. A parade was 
formed at *the Arlington Avenue entrance. 
Among those in line were the St. Mary's 
Academy band, the Mount Clare band, officials 
of the Company, and numbers of representa- 
tives from the various departments at Mount 
(Mare. The flag raising was held at the Popple- 
ton Street entrance. A number of good talks 
were given and several patriotic selections 
played by the bands. The affair was a most 
enjoyable one. 

The employes of No. 3 machine shop, the 
steel car plant and the blue print room in that 
shop, are to be congratulated on their patriotic 
demonstration held during noon hour, April 13. 
''Fred" Scott was master of ceremonies and 
W. F. Fox, of this city, gave a short talk on 
patriotism. Mrs. Lawrence Street and Miss 
Ida Lynch sang solos, which were much 
enjoyed. The affair was very impressive and 
most enjoyable. 

The employes of the office building at Mount 
Clare held a flag raising at noon, April 21, 
"Old Glory" being unfurled over the office of 
superintendent of shops Finegan. The pro- 
gram follows: 

Invocation, the Rev. Paul B. Watlington; 
selection by Mount Clare band, "Gate City," 
by A. F. Weldon; introducing speakers, W. 
Allman; patriotic address, Ex-Senator David 
E. Dick; singing by the assembly, "America;" 
selection by Mount Clare band, "National 
Defense," by J. B. Lampe; address, Lieutenant 
George D. Riley; raising of the "Stars and 
Stripes" by a detachment of Coast Artillery- 
men from Fort Howard, under the command 
of Lieutenant Riley; selection by Mount Clare 
band, "The Star Spangled Banner." 

The committee of arrangements was com- 
posed of William N. Allman, chairman, C. E. 
Mitchell, J. A. Renehan, J. E. Riley, A. G. 
Walther, E. E. Ford and J. Schlarb. This 
committee should be congratulated for the 
excellent management of the affair, which was 
most successful and more than enjoyed by the 
large number of people attending. The ad- 
dresses were particularly appropriate, well 
chosen and well delivered, and the occasion 
will long be remembered. The decorations 
for the occasion were especially attractive. 
Lit tle Cyril Beck, son of H. T. Beck, accountant 
;it Mount Clare, performed the ceremony of 
raising the "Stars and Stripes." 

Effective April 10 Miss Lillian L. Gaither, 
formerly telephone operator in the office of 
the superintendent of shops, was promoted to 
a position in the office of F. Paullis, assistant 
to the superintendent of shops. Miss Gaither 
was succeeded by Miss Helen Davis. We were 
all glad to see Miss Gaither get this well de- 
served promol ion. 

Several new fares have recently been added 
to the force of the office of the superintendent 



of shops, including those of L. A. Mogart, 
transferred from Locust Point, C. R. Robinson 
and G. L. Cann. 

R. J. Davis, formerly teamster foreman at 
Mount Clare, has left the service of the Com- 
pany to enlist in the Navy as a seaman appren- 
tice. He was succeeded by W r . Walther. We 
were all sorry to see "Bob" leave us, but he 
should be commended very strongly for his 
patriotic action. 

Effective April 1 J. Howe was appointed 
general foreman in charge of locomotive re- 
pairs, vice C. B. Woodworth, resigned. G. H. 
Kapinos has been appointed supervisor of 
shop machinery and tools, vice A. E. McNabb, 
resigned. Mr. Kapinos was succeeded as 
foreman of No. 1 machine shop by H. M. 
Haigley, formerly his assistant. E. S. Sheppard 
was promoted from position of foreman of steel 
car plant to assistant machine shop foreman of 
No. 1 shop. He was succeeded by E. E. 
Emmerich. H. L. Taylor, William Kaiser, and 
C. W. Broughton, gang foremen of No. 1 
machine shop, also received promotions 
recently. 

Mcunt Clare Welfare, Athletic and 
Pleasure Association 

On the evening of March 26, the Mount Clare 
Welfare, Athletic and Pleasure Association 
held the final athletic carnival of its indoor 
season. Four hundred Baltimore and Ohio 
employes, together with many officials of the 
Company, attended. The contests were in- 
teresting and much enjoyed by the contestants 
and spectators. The hall was appropriately 
decorated with the national colors and the 
emblem of the association. 

The evening of April 3 was ladies' night at 
the Mount Clare Welfare, Athletic and Pleasure 
Association Gymnasium. About 250 persons 
attended. 

The basketball team journeyed to Belair on 
March 31 and defeated the high school of that 
place 38 to 28. The pass work of Kammer 
and Milholland was noteworthy, as was the 
fine defense work of Emmerich and Byrne. 
Ripkin played his usual good game at center. 
Numbers played best for the high school boys. 

Baltimore and Ohio Apprentice 
Association 

Correspondent, J. T. Talbot, President 

To date nine of our members have gone to 
serve their country. Six of them have (Mi- 
listed in (lie Navy, two in the First Regiment, 
AI. \. G. and one in the U. S. Marine Corps. 
Those who have enlisted in the Navy are: 
E. R. Coleman, IJ. A. Mercer, J. E. Firoved, 
\Y. E. Reaney, L. C. Markland, F. G. Listman. 
( \ E. St . E. Grice and F. N. Brown have enlisted 
in the First Regiment, M. X. G., and W. E. 
Donovan in the Marine Corps. 

We have quite a number of members who have 
enlisted in other regiments not yet called out. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



07 



C. W. Englc has been transferred from the 
Riverside shops to Mt. Clare, to complete his 
apprenticeship. 

E. Y. Johnson completed his apprenticeship 
on April 25 and is now working in the passenger 
roundhouse at Riverside. We all feel sure 
that he will soon be in the supervision force, 
as he is a bright young man. ♦ 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
Thomas R. Rees, Secretary to Superintendent 
W. C. Montignani, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
C. L. Kalbaugh, Chief Clerk to Master Mechanic 

Divisional Safety Committee 

G. D. Brooke Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Deneen Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt., East End 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshoxce Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 

L. J. Wilmoth Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

R. B. Stout Assistant Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

Dr. J. A. Dorner Medical Examiner 

Dr. F. H. D. Biser Medical Examiner 

Dr. L. D. Xorris Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

E. E. Dean Car Foreman, East End 

W. T. Davis Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

W. M. Hinkey Storekeeper 

W. S. Harig Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Taylor Master Carpenter 

W. L. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. Montignani. .Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
A. L. Brown. . . .Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. R. Reckley Freight Engineer 

O. E. Pace Freight Fireman 

J. W. McMackin Freight Conductor 

H. H. Barley .Yard Brakeman 

J. G. Defibaugh Machinist 

R . L. Fields Car Inspector 

J. C. Snyder Operator 



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68 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association of 
Cumberland, Md. 



President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. H.vnley Division Engineer 

R. B. Stout Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh . .Division Operator 

D. H. Street Division Freight Agent 

W. H. Linn General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

T. F. Shaffer Chief Clerk to Division Engineer 



C. F. Filler, chief clerk in our storekeeper's 
office for several years, has been transferred 
to the Staten Island storekeeper's office, as 
chief clerk. "Cal" is a fine fellow, and 
although we hate to see him leave us, we are 
glad that he has received a well merited pro- 
motion. Our loss is Staten Island's gain. 

Keyser 

On the evening of April 19 the largest excur- 
sion that ever left Keyser went to Cumberland 
to attend the services in the Stephens Taber- 
nacle. About a thousand Keyserites made the 
trip and that they were well satisfied with 
Baltimore and Ohio service is attested by the 
following letter of appreciation from the ex- 
cursion committee, published in the Mineral 
Daily News, of Keyser: 

An Appreciation 

We, the undersigned, in our representative 
capacity in connection with the excursion to 
Cumberland last evening, for the purpose of 
attending services at the Stephens Tabernacle, 
desire hereby to convey the hearty apprecia- 
tion of the very large crowd that went to Cum- 
berland to Mr. J. Z. Terrell, agent of the Balti- 
more and Ohio at Keyser, and his assistants, 
and to the management for the highly satis- 
factory and efficient manner in which the ex- 
cursion was conducted, especially for the ample 
equipment provided and the courteous atten- 
tion accorded the people of Keyser for their 
comfort. 

Rev, H. V. Givler, 
Rev. G. G. Martin, 
Rev. W. A. Wilt, 
Rev. A. N. Perryman, 
Oscar Cosner, 
h. s. thompson) 
W. A. Reed. 

An illustrated lecture on the National 
Capital was given in the Keyser High School 
Auditorium on the evening of April 20 by 
W. H. Foust, our traveling passenger agent at 
Pittsburgh, assisted by C. W. Allen, OUT trav- 
eling passenger agent at Baltimore. The 
speakers told of the history and beauties of 
t t,c capital Mil 'I id'' pci i riot ic significance of ils 
historic spots. 

An import anl paii of the work of winning the 
w:ir will be done by amateur fanners and 



gardeners — for feeding the fighting men of the 
Allies is almost as important as fighting our- 
selves. Keyser is right up to the minute in 
this work, and more gardens are being planted 
than ever before. 

Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

Born to Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Butts, a son. 
Mr. Butts is a member of our car yard force. 

H. C. McDaniel is the proud father of a fine 
baby boy. 

Miss Grace R. Butler and Henry R. Coleman 
were recently married in the bride's home in 
this city. Mr. Coleman is a Baltimore and 
Ohio foreman and a fine young fellow. His 
many. .friends among his fellow employes are 
congratulating him and his charming bride. 
The young couple will make their home in 
Cumberland. 

Miss Nellie Ray Harman, a daughter of con- 
ductor L. W. Harman, and David William 
Fockler were recently married in the home of 
the bride, in Cumberland. Mr. Fockler is a 
clerk in the service of our Company. After an 
extended honeymoon the}' will make their 
home in Cumberland. 

William P. Williams, one of our best known 
trainmen, died on April 10. He had been in 
the service of the Company for many years and 
enjoyed the full confidence of his superior 
officers and of his fellow employes. The funeral 
services, which were attended by many of his 
fellow workers, were held at his late home on 
April 12. Mr. Williams is survived by a 
widow and two sons. 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 
E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

R. F. Haney, Conductor, Weston 

C. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. M. Scott Chairman, Superintendent, Grafton, W. Va. 

E. D. Griffin Trainmaster, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Giafton, W. Ya. 

\V. I. Rowland Road Foreman, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton, W. Ya. 

H L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg, W. Ya. 

Dr. C. A. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton, W. Ya. 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont, W. Va. 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clarksbuig, W. Va. 

R. L. Schill Agent, Weston, W. Va. 

E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon, W. Ya. 

F. W. Tutt Secretary, Chief Clerk to Division 

Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

Rotatinc! Members 
L W. C« rapes Fireman, Fairmont, W. Ya. 

D. P. Pidenour Machinist, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. Pickens Brnkeman, Grafton, W. Va. 

A. L. Lunsford Engineer, Weston, W. Va. 

G. W. Binnix Car Inspector, Fairmont , W. Va. 

.1. W. HoeniB, .Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

W. P. Kim \id Locomotive Inspector, Fairmont, W. Va. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



There have recently been a number of changes 
in our office force. F. J. Patton, the chief 
clerk to the superintendent, one of the most 
popular and well known men on the division, 
has decided to sever his connection with this 
Company and take a shot at the coal business. 
"Shorty" is one of the organizers of the Pansy 
Coal Co. and also the Paleb Coal Co., operating 
in this district. He expects to contribute 
extensively to the war loan after being in busi- 
ness for a couple of weeks. Good luck to you, 
"Shorty." We are sorry to see you go, but are 
not worrying as to your success. C. L. Ford, 
chief clerk to the division engineer, has been 
selected to fill Mr. Patton's position. Mr. 
Ford is a hardworking man and success is sure 
to crown his efforts, as he is universally liked 
by all employes. F. Warder Tutt, motive 
power accountant, succeeds Mr. Ford. Mr. 
Tutt is very deserving of the promotion. 

Blair Mugler has been promoted from index 
clerk to trace clerk, vice James Burns, Jr. 

Gail Fishback has been made general car 
distributer. Bee Skinner, day car distributer; 
L. J. Miller, night car distributer and Fred 
White, clerk. 

Miss Helen Colburn, one of the popular 
stenographers in the division engineer's office, 
recently spent a few days sight-seeing in Pitts- 
burgh. 

Miss Katie Tucker has been added to the 
office force of the master mechanic, vice J. 
Keetch, who has been transferred to the 
Cumberland Division. 

Dorsey Fast, one of the division freight 
agent's force, and a member of Company E, 
First Infantry, National Guard of West Vir- 
ginia, has gone to a mobilization camp to do 
his part in fighting for the Stars and Stripes. 

C. M. Stubbins, who has for the last twelve 
years been connected with the car distributer's 
office, has resigned to accept a position as a 
traveling salesman for the Diamond Match 
Company, of Chicago. He is succeeded by 
J. T. Burns, Jr. 

Amid the shrieks of the engine and shop 
whistles Baltimore and Ohio shopmen, headed 
by master mechanic J. A. Anderson, raised 
Old Glory over our yards. Sparkling and 
patriotic speeches were made by Mr. Anderson, 
M. K. Barnum, assistant to vice-president 
Davis, and attorney Frederick Martin. The 
names of the subscribers to the flag fund were 
signed to a patriotic pledge and placed in the 
base of the flag staff. The men pledged them- 
selves to keep the Stars and Stripes flying and 
to follow and protect it wherever it goes. 

The marriage of Monongah Division train 
dispatcher J. T. Dorsey to Miss Bernadine 
Shilling, of Baltimore, on April 18, has been 
announced. 

This happy event clears the decks of the 
Monongah Division headquarters of eligibles 
for "Mr. Cupid." No more available bach- 
elors. This speaks well for the gallantry of the 
Monongah Division men. 




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We cordially invite all employes to inspect 
carefully the advertising now appearing in 
our Magazine. It is our purpose to offer 
only such things as will legitimately appeal 
to the rank and file of our readers. All 
advertising will be rigidly examined before 
insertion so that there may be no question 
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70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondents 

M. J. Sauter, Office of Superintendent 
D. F. Allread, Agent, Folsom, W. Va. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. M. Haver Chairman, Superintendent 

E. H. Barnhart Division Engineer 

A. L. Brown Master Mechanic 

W. F. Ross Road Foreman of Engines 

\V. Beverly Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent , Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

C. E. Burgey Freight Engineer 

C. Hollingsworth Freight Fireman 

W. P. Stewart Freight Conductor 

H. B. Welch Painter 

W. R. Blandkoro Machinist 

J. W. Gear Machinist 

Assistant division engineer W. B. Wills is 
the proud father of an eight-pound girl. 

Candidates for baseball teams are being lined 
up and practice will be started in the near 
future. There will be two teams at Benwood 
and one each at Wheeling and Holloway. The 
Wheeling team will probably have their head- 
quarters at Tunnel Green, where extensive 
improvements are contemplated. 

Effective April 1 W. M. Haver was appointed 
superintendent of the Wheeling Division. 
Before his appointment as assistant superin- 
tendent of the Pittsburgh Division Mr. Haver 
held the position of terminal trainmaster in 
charge of Wheeling Terminals. His return to 
the division as superintendent is heartily wel- 
comed by all employes. 

The employes at Wheeling, by voluntary 
contribution, purchased a large American flag 
which is now proudly waving over the Wheeling 
passenger station. 

Brakeman N. Thomas, who had previously 
served on the Mexican border from June, 1916, 
to February 24, 1917, has rejoined Company 
K, second West Virginia National Guard. 

Dispatcher J. E. Rickey is enjoying a brief 
vacation in the forests of Canada. 

We are getting organized to give old Mr. 
High Cost of Living an awful wallop. Gardens 
are being planted everywhere. 

Why can't the Wheeling Division be repre- 
sented each month in the Magazine? Surely 
there are things happening on our division that 
would make interesting reading if they were 
written up and sent to the MAGAZINE, Let's all 
get busy and keep out of t he "no news" column. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
E. L. SOBRELL, Office of Superintendent 
\\ . E, Barnhart, Office of Superintendent 
\Y. E; Kennedy, Office of Superintendent 



Divisional Safety Committee 

J. W. Root Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E. Bryan Division Engineer 

O. J. Kelly Master Mechanic 

F. C. Moran Trainmaster 

E. J. Langhurst Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. A. J. Bossyns Medical Examiner 

W. E. Kennedy Division Claim Agent 

E. Chapman Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

R. E. Barnhart Agent- Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

B. O'Connor '. Engineer 

W. Boyles Fireman 

T. C. Hogan Conductor 

L. H. Tracy Brakeman 

J. L. Davis „ Car Department 

J. R. Fowler * Locomotive Department 

L. A. Costello Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, F. P. Neu, Secretary to 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. B. Green Superintendent 

F. P. Neu Secretary 

J. J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head .Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

F. W. Rhuark Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H. Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

Dr. R. D. Sykes Medical Examiner 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. Ttjttle Division Operator 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

E. J. Crampton Agent, Elyria 

R. Blythe Operator, Canton 

C. E. Biechler Section Foreman, Sterling 

J. T. Sidaway Carpenter, Massillon 

W. E. Butts Conductor, Lorain 




FLAG RAISING AT LORAIN 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 




A. H. Sheffield Engineer, Lorain 

W. B. Shockcor Engineer, Cleveland 

A. L. Ruth Conductor, Akron 

F. J. Rericha Conductor, Cleveland 

J. Losier Car Inspector, Cleveland 

J. Lewis Fipe Shop Foreman, Lorain 



On the afternoon of April 16 a flag raising was 
held at our Cleveland shop. The flag was 
purchased by the employes to show their 
patriotism. Before the raising of the flag a 
patriotic address was delivered by Mayor 
Davis. Members of the Fifth Regiment, 
O. N. G., four buglers, and a band aided in the 
ceremonies, and the event was capped by our 
most popular engineer, Harrison Lynch, driving 
an engine over a Presidential salute of twenty- 
one torpedoes. 

The picture on the opposite page is of the flag 
raising at Lorain. This flag is the largest 
flying in Lorain and was also purchased by 
employes at that point. It was raised on 
April 21, amid cheers and patriotic songs, after 
addresses had been given by officers of the 
Company. It was raised by soldiers of Uncle 
Sam stationed at Lorain. 

The raising of "Old Glory " at both places, we 
feel, expressed the patriotic spirit of our em- 
ployes and we are sure that at other 
points, where an affair of this nature cannot be 
arranged, the same spirit prevails. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark, O. 

C. H. Titus Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

T. J. Daly Assistant Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

J. Tordella Division Engineer, Newark, O. 

Wm. Streck Road Foreman, Newark, O. 

W. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Newark, O. 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent, Newark, O. 

D. L. Host T. M. & C. T. D., Columbus, O. 

C. G. Miller Shopman, Newark, O. 

J. A. Mitchell Conductor, Newark, O. 

W. C. Neighbarger Engineer, Newark, O. 

J. C. McVicker Fireman, Newark, O. 

W. F. Hall Car Repairman, Newark, O. 

D. E. Duffy Blacksmith, Newark, O. 

C. Rittenhouse Yard Conductor, Newark, O. 



Ever since the war became a certainty the 
employes of the Baltimore and Ohio have been 
showing their patriotism by wearing small 
American flags, decorating their engines and 
cabooses with larger ones and taking subscrip- 
tions for the purchase of flags to fly over their 
offices and shops. 

On the morning of April 10 K. E. Fleeter, 
roundhouse foreman at Chicago Junction, 
started to take up a collection for a flag for the 
roundhouse. The response was ready and 
generous. A flag pole forty-five feet high was 
erected on top of the roundhouse, the flag 
purchased, and arrangements made for the flag 




The Trained Man Wins 

In the railroad business it's the trained man 
who wins. Carrying hundreds of millions of 
passengers every year, it is absolutely necessary 
that tne responsible positions in railroading be 
filled with none but the most highly trained 
men. Your advancement will depend largely 
on the thoroughness of your training. 

If you really want a better job and are willing 
to devote a little of your spare time to getting 
ready, the International Correspondence Schools 
can help you. More than two hundred of the 
railroad systems of the United States and Canada 
have indorsed the /. C. 5. method of instruction 
and recommended it to their employes. 

You're ambitious. You want to get ahead. 
Then don't turn this page until you have clipped 
the coupon, marked the line of work you want 
to follow and mailed it to the I. C. S. for full par- 
ticulars. Doing so will not obligate you. 

I— — — — — — TEAR OUT HERE — — — — — 

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Box 8492, SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the 
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Locomotive Engineer 
Locomotive Fireman 
Traveling Engineer 
Traveling Fireman 
Air Brake Inspector 
Air Brake Repairman 
Round House Foreman 
Trainmen and Carmen 
Railway Conductor 
Mechanical Engineer 
Mechanical Draftsman 
Machine Shop Practice 
Boiler Maker or Designer 
Steam Engineer 
Steam-Electric Engineer 
Civil Engineer 
Surveying and Mapping 
R. R. Constructing 
Bridge Engineer 
LJ Architect 

D Architectural Draftsman 

□ Contract Dr and Builder 

□ Structure 1 Engineer 



BR. R. Agency Accounting 
R. R. Genl. Office Accting 
Bookkeeper 

Stenographer and Typist 
Higher Accounting 
Mathematics 
Good English 
Salesmanship 
Advertising Man 
Civil Service 
Railway Mail Clerk 
Electrical Engineer 
Electrician 
Electric Wiring 
Electric Lighting 
Telegraph Expert 

□ Mine Foreman or Engineer 
3 Metallurgist o* - Prospector 

Chemical Engineer 
Agriculture □ Spanish 

Poultry Raising □ German 
_ Automobiles □ French 

□ into Repairing □ Italian 



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Occupation 
& Employer. 
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and No 



City_ 



.State. 



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7 2 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




FLAG RAISING AT NEWARK 

raising. This ceremony took place the same 
day at noon. 

The shop men, many road men and a crowd 
of citizens of Chicago Junction attended the 
ceremony. The Rev. Connel had his Boys' 
Band on hand. This is an organization of which 
Chicago Junction is proud. It consists of 
eighteen pieces, and all the players are boys of 
from ten to fifteen years of age. 

At 12.20 the band played "The Star Spangled 
Banner" and amid the cheers of the crowd the 
flag was raised. The Rev. Connel made a 
short but inspiring speech. 

On April 16 the Newark Division office em- 
ployes gave vent to their patriotic feelings by 
holding a flag raising. The crowd present 
numbered about a thousand. The Newark 
Buckeye Band played several patriotic airs, 
after which eloquent addresses were delivered 
by superintendent Stevens and manager G. H. 
Mosser, of the Newark Chamber of Commerce. 
The accompanying picture shows "Old Glory" 
being raised to the top of the staff while the 
band played "The Star Spangled Banner" and 
the crowd cheered lustily. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup't, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass't Sup't, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

O. L. Eaton Chairman, Superintendent 

CM. Stone Trainmaster 

T. E. Miller Master Mechanic 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner 

H. B. Pigman Division Operator 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

H. D. Whip Relief Agent 

C. A. Albright Agent 

E. E. McDonald Agent 

W. F. Herwick Conductor 

W. J. Dayron Road Brakeman 

O. E. Newcomer Fireman 

W. H. Metzgar Supervisor 

E. C. Lucas Car Foreman 

A. L. Friel Shop Foreman 

H. E. Cochran Secretary 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Murray, Office of Sup't, Pittsburgh 
B. J. McQuade, Office of Sup't, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 

T. J. Brady Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

W. J. Kennedy Secretary 

C. C. Cook Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

E. J. Brennan. .'. Superintendent of Shops 

F. P. Pfahler Master Mechanic 

A. J. Weise General Car Foreman 

F. Bryne Claim Agent 

W. F. Deneke Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor.: Medical Examiner 

R. F. Langdon Brakeman 

E. D. McCaughey Fireman 

E. P. Chenowith Conductor 

J. J. Berry Foreman, Glenwood 

J. L. Soliday Engineer 




EMPLOYES TAKING PA BT IN THE FLAG RAISING CEREMONIES AT CHICAGO JUNCTION 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



Hubert B. Smith, assistant yardmaster at 
Demmler, has been transferred to the American 
Railway Association Commission on Car 
Service, as an inspector. He is working in this 
territory and getting along nicely. We wish 
him all success. 

The following agents have been commended 
by Mr. Brady for the excellent condition of 
their accounts and records, developed at a 
recent inspection: J. J. Kruper, agent at Fitz 
Henry; C. B. Reno, ticket agent at Allegheny; 
R. H. Brundage, agent at Scott Haven and 
C. J. Shafer, agent at Wylandville. 

Keep up the good work, boys. Your splendid 
efforts are a reflection of the efficiency of the 
entire division. 

The Pittsburgh Division Athletic Association 
is doing some splendid work along welfare lines. 
Several baseball teams have already been 
organized, and by June 15 we expect to have a 
team good enough to hold its own anywhere on 
the System. So look out ! 

The Glee Club is already attracting attention 
throughout the city, and as we have not sung a 
note before the public we feel that this is a 
good omen for our prospects in the future. 
Mr. Will Earhart, in charge of music in the 
public schools of Pittsburgh, was with us on 
April 12, and gave us a splendid talk. He also 
made some flattering remarks about our 
singing. 

Keep your eye on the Pittsburgh Division 
Glee Club. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondent, J. J. Lloyd, Chief Clerk 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. W. VanHorn Chairman, Superintendent 

C. P. Angell Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 

J. J. McGuire Master Mechanic 

J. B. Daugherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken Agent, Youngstown, O. 

W. U. Charlton, M. D Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Division Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox . Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill Division Operator 

C. H. Waldron General Yardmaster 

A. T. Humbert. . : Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

E. M. Mitchell Road Engineer 

Wm. Logan Road Fireman 

G. W. Senheiser Road Conductor 

H. Wilhide Yard Engineer 

John Rhodes Yard Conductor 

C. H. Bartlett Boilermaker 

F. P. Ryan Work Checker, Car Department 

Miss Mary Johnson, of New Castle, and 
boilermaker R. H. Walker, of New Castle 
Junction shops, were married on April 11. 
They spent their honeymoon in Chicago and 
Cleveland. We wish them both great happi- 
ness. 

Roundhouse foreman J. R. Kane, who was on 
the sick list for two weeks, has returned to 
work as fat as ever. He still wears his broad 
smile. 

The new station at Mahoningtown, which 
will handle all New Castle passenger traffic, 
is nearly completed. It is planned to have a 
fitting opening and, in addition to a band there 



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71 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



will be several speakers, including public offi- 
cials of New Castle and Mahoningtown, who 
will accept the new station on behalf of the 
people of their cities. 

Word has just reached us that Benjamin F. 
Kaup, traveling freight agent at Youngstown 
for many years, died on April 15, at his home 
in Tiffin, Ohio. 

Mr. Kaup was an old P. & W. man, well 
known and well liked by all who had had the 
good fortune to meet him. A short sketch of 
his life will appear in the next issue. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, P. G. Ervin, Assistant 
Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. H. Jackson Superintendent, Chairman, Garrett, Ind. 

T. J. Rogers. . . Trainmaster, Vice-Chahman, Garrett, Ind. 
T. E. Jamison Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

F. X. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

R. R. Jenkins Secretary Y. M. C. A., Chicago Jet., O. 

Dr. C. W. Hedrick Medical Examiner, Chicago Jet., O. 

Dr. F. Dorsey Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

T. E. Spurrier Claim Agent, Tiffin, O. 

John Draper Agent, Chicago, 111. 

F. W. Paden Agent, North Baltimore, O. 

S. T. Leek Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

A. Drelbelbis Fireman, Garrett, Ind. 

J. C. Williams Conductor, Garrett, Ind. 

F. A. Kern Brakeman, Garrett, Ind. 

E. R. Bishop Yard Brakeman, Chicago Jet., O. 

H. H. Vanderbosc h Machinist, Garrett, Ind. 

R. Kingsbury Wheel Checker, Car Dept., Garrett, Ind. 

C. W. Carpenter Boilermaker, Chicago Jet., O. 

Wm. Shultz Pipefitter, South Chicago, 111. 



August Luke has been appointed freight and 
ticket agent at McCool, Indiana, vice H. B. 
Bonham, who has been transferred to the 
same position at Chicago Junction, Ohio. 

F. S. France, for the last few years ticket 
agent at Fostoria, Ohio, has resigned, effective 
April 15, to accept a similar position with the 
New York Central Lines at P'ostoria. We 
regret losing Mr. France, but wish him success 
in his new position. 

L. S. Ailman, relief agent, 1ms been appointed 
acting agent at Chicago Junction, vice E. J. 
Crampton, transferred to the Cleveland Divi- 
sion. Mr. Ailman will nerve until the latter 
pari of the month, when II. B. Bonham will 
take charge. 

E. P. Lepper, relief agent, has been appointed 
acting agent at Commercial Avenue, South 
Chicago, vice L. O. Young, who has been 
transferred to Xapanee. 

C. II. Whiteman, former agent at Napanee, 
has been transferred, in the same capacity, to 
Albion, Indiana, in place of W. U. Holderman, 

who has resigned from the service. Mr. 

Whiteman has been in the service of the Com- 
pany for the last forty years. 



H. E. Ringle has been appointed acting agent 
at Bremen, Indiana, vice W. F. Mensel, who is 
on the sick list. We know that Mr. Ringle will 
make good. 

Effective April 1 H. H. Harsh, for the last few 
years division engineer at Garrett, was trans- 
ferred to the Pittsburgh Division, as division 
engineer. He is succeeded by John Tordella. 
Mr. Tordella was associated with us for over 
three years and we are glad to have him back. 

On April 14 the employes of the roundhouse 
held a celebration, the occasion being the 
raising of Old Glory over the south end of the 
roundhouse. There were about five hundred 
people present and the flag was raised amid the 
playing of the Garrett Band and the cheers of 
the crowd. Flags are now flying from almost 
every building in the shops and from many 
buildings throughout the town. 

W. J. Pollard, car distributer of the Chicago 
Division, is again on the sick list and his place 
is being filled by assistant chief clerk to superin- 
tendent P. G. Ervin. It is hoped that Mr. 
Pollard will be able to resume duty in the near 
future. O. V. Kincade is acting as assistant 
chief clerk to superintendent. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

Cashier A. E. Pollard has been appointed 
chief clerk to trainmaster Huggins, vice E. E. 
Hunsicker, resigned to accept a position as 
assistant to the president and general superin- 
tendent of the Chicago Short Line Railway. 
Mr. Hunsicker has been with us for a good many 
years and through his training is well qualified 
for his new position. C. A. Timberlake suc- 
ceeds Mr. Pollard as cashier. 

Miss Florence Cameron, stenographer in 
general foreman Burke's office, has returned 
from a delightful trip to California. 

Safety and Social Club News 

The stag party given by the Baltimore and 
Ohio Safety and Social Club on the evening of 
March 28 proved to be a grand success. 

This is the first entertainment of the Club 
since its recent reorganization. It was held as 
a get-together affair, and is a forerunner of a 
more elaborate social program. Our next 
endeavor will include the ladies — probably a 
dance to be held in the near future. Watch us 
grow ! 

L. R. Napierkowski, piecework inspector, 
has been promoted to gang foreman, vice 
F. P. Merton, resigned. F. J. Kroll, has been 
promoted to piecework inspector. L. Stas- 
zewski has also been made piecework inspector, 
vice S. (!. Jamrock, resigned. 

All of these gentlemen are members of our 

( Jlub and we wish t hem success In t heir new and 
more responsible positions. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, R. G. Clark, Assistant 
Abstracter, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster 

C. P. Palmer Division Engineer 

F. E. Lamphere Assistant Engineer 

Alex. Craw Division Claim Agent 

W. J. Wainman Captain of Police 

C. L. Hegley Examiner and Recorder 

H. McDonald Supervisor, Chicago Division 

Wm. Hogan Supervisor, Calumet Division 

F. K. Moses Master Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines 

Chas. Esping Master Carpenter 

Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner 

C. O. Seifert Signal Supervisor 

Morris Altherr Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

J. O. Callahan General Car Foreman 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

O. E. Burger Engine Foreman, East Chicago, Ind. 

F. Foley Engine Foreman, Blue Island, 111. 

J. Wise Engine Foreman, Robey Street 

John Bickel Engineer, Robey Street 

M. J. McHugh Fireman, Robey Street 

Thos. Kennedy Engineer, East Chicago, Ind. 

Fred Krause Fireman, East Chicago, Ind. 

H. J. Masse Machinist, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. E. Lowry Boilermaker, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. Bock Machinist, Robey Street 

D. W. Alderman Car Inspector, Robey Street 

C. Blough, towerman at C. G. W. Junction 
tower, is again under quarantine owing to the 
fact that his son, Harold, has contracted 
scarlet fever. We are sure that Mr. Blough 
has had more than his share of hard luck of 
late, and we sincerely hope for the early re- 
covery of his son. 

General freight and passenger agent P. 
Meininger is receiving the congratulations of 
his friends upon the arrival of a baby girl in 
his home on Easter morning. 

Another man wearing a particularly broad 
smile these days is W. C. Oliphant, chief clerk 
in the Revenue Department of the auditor's 
office. It's a lusty ten pound boy and his 
name is Walter J. 

Frank Corrigan, stenographer in the district 
engineer's office, has accepted a position as 
secretary to the captain of police in the Brighton 
Park district. He says that his friends had 
better not start anything now, and asks us to 
give especial warning to "Bill" Kinnear. 

The many friends of carpenter foreman S. R. 
Ball will be sorry to learn that he has been 
confined to his home with rheumatism for 
some time. Mr. Ball has been in the service 
for twenty-six years and has a legion of friends 
on the System. 

The management of the Athletic Association 
baseball team has been placed in the hands of 
L. H. Reinke, who knows the game from 
"A to Izzard" and back again. With Mr. 
Reinke as manager and Mr. Irish as assistant 
manager we may safely feel that our team has a 
good start toward the championship. 



J. Farrell has been transferred from Lincoln 
Street to the district engineer's office as file 
clerk. 

The Divisional Safety Committee is doing 
great work in eliminating unsafe conditions all 
along the line, and every employe can do his 
part if he will report to the proper officer any 
condition he does not think right. At the 
present time, especially, the employe who 
reports immediately anything out of the 
ordinary will not only be promoting Safety 
First, but will be doing a patriotic act. 

The Stag given by the Athletic Association 
in their club rooms on April 18 was a great 
success. Six acts of vaudeville, plenty of eats 
and smokes and a lot of amateur music and 
singing (B. L. T. please note) combined to 
make the evening a "large one." T. H. 
Williams, acting entertainment chairman, is 
to be congratulated. 

The National Railway Bowling Tournament 
was held in Chicago on April 14. The Chicago 
Terminal was represented by four teams — 
the Athletic Association team, the renowned 
East Chicago team, and two independent 
teams, the "Whales" and the "Gashousers." 
The final standings have not yet been pub- 
lished, but we feel confident that our teams will 
be well to the front. 

It is with deep regret that we record the 
death of Charles Lampie, joint freight car 
inspector, on April 7. Mr. Lampie's service 
record dated from 1888, making him one of the 
oldest employes on the Terminal. 

We are glad to announce that George Ziaski, 
stationary engineer at the Lincoln Street power 
plant, who was painfully scalded by a bursting 
steam pipe, is able to resume work. 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator 
C. D. Office, Chillicothe, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent 

R. Mallen Road Foreman of Engines 

H. E. Greenwood Master Mechanic 

C. H. R. Howe. Division Engineer 

T. E. Banks Trainmaster 

Dr. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

L. A. Pausch Supervisor 

L. B. Manss. '. Captain of Police 

L. Kedash Road Conductor 

C. Skinner Road Brakeman 

S. B. Frost Road Engineer 

L. W. Schaffer Road Fireman 

H. L. Shea Yard Fireman 

J. Shane Machinist 

J. Rutherford Tank Repairman 

S. Griffin Agent, Hillsboro 

You can't keep the cat in the bag forever! 
We learn that Miss Leona Streitenberger, 
stenographer in the freight office, and "Dan" 
Cadden, yard fireman at Portsmouth, were 
married last September. Congratulations! 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES -MAGAZINE 



A large American flag will be raised on the 
lawn at the Chillicothe passenger station in 
the near future. Almost $50 has been sub- 
scribed by the shop employes toward defraying 
the expense of buying the flag. Work is being 
rushed on a 75-foot pipe pole. A patriotic 
demonstration is planned for the flag raising 
and a big time is expected. 

The following operators have been appointed 
recently: C. R. Irvin, first trick, Portsmouth; 
R. K. Hall, first trick, Washington Court 
House; A. E. Combs, third trick, Harpers; 
E. E. Ray, third trick, Bloom Junction, and 
O. F. Dewey, night operator, Haynes. 

James Hunsinger, boilermaker, and several 
machinists at the Chillicothe shops, have 
enlisted in the Navy. 

The air brake instruction car in charge of Mr. 
Schriever is now at Chillicothe. Mr. Schriever 
is giving daily lectures on air brakes and train 
equipment of all kinds. 

Work on stringing the new copper wires for 
the Midland and Portsmouth Branch telephone 
circuits has been started and should be com- 
pleted in a few weeks. This will require two 
new wires from Chillicothe to Midland City, 
where it will go in simplex with some other wire 
to Columbus. Also two new wires from Chilli- 
cothe to Hamden and from Hamden to Ports- 
mouth. When completed this will make one 
circuit from Columbus to Portsmouth. Train 
dispatchers Woodward, Moriarity and Neff 
will doubtless welcome the change from the 
telegraph key to the telephone. 

Engineer Philip Rhulman left Parkersburg 
twenty-two minutes late on No. 29 on April 12, 
with nine cars, and arrived at Chillicothe at 
1.50 p. m. — on time. He ran away from dis- 
patcher Clyde Athey, who had to change the 
meeting point with No. 12 from Grosvenor to 
New Marshfield. 




TRAIN So. 5 ARRIVING AT TONTOGANY 

Photo mtmbitttd fry Hoitnt Tucker 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

S. U. Hooper Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. Purkhiser Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. R. Gibson Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Quigley Master Mechanic, Seymour, Ind. 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. Horan .General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massmann Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky 

J. E. O'Dom Special Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

Rotating Members 

L. N. Simmons Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

A. Beck Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

Lon Durham Passenger Engineer, Louisville, Ky. 

C. W. Kline Track Foreman, Osgood, Ind. 



C. S. Roegge, formerly clerk to the train- 
master at Seymour, has been transferred to 
the position of stenographer to the division 
accountant. Miss L. E. Brand, stenographer 
to the chief clerk, succeeds Mr. Roegge. E. G. 
Mascher, stenographer in the division engi- 
neer's office, succeeds Miss Brand. O. W. 
Breitfield, file clerk, succeeds Mr. Mascher. 
G. M. Foist succeeds Mr. Breitfield. J. Mc- 
Geehee, formerly employed as stenographer to 
the division accountant, has been promoted to 
the position of stenographer to the superin- 
tendent of motive power, Cincinnati. 

Effective April 16 R. P. Stanton was ap- 
pointed agent at Hayden, Ind., vice G. J. Cudd, 
transferred. 

Effective April 17 George T. Thomas was 
appointed agent at North Vernon, Ind., vice 
J. E. Hudson. 

Effective April 20 S. D. Hutchinson was 
appointed agent at Winton Place, Ohio, vice 
R. P. Staton, transferred. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, Joseph Beel, Transportation 
Department 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. L. Terrant Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

J. Weidenweber Secietary 

J. H. Meyers Trainmaster 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman of Engines 

L. A. Cordie .Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. J. Larhick Car Foreman 

J. A. Tschuor General Foreman 

T. Mahoney Supervisor 

Rotating Members 

P. Koth General Foreman 

Geo. Schlenker Chief Rate Clerk 

A. C \ yton Yard Engineer 

R. G. Von Hokne Yardmaster 

W. J. Maloney Chief Yard Clerk 

J. D. Green Machinist 



It has been noticed in the issues of the 
MAGAZINE for March and April that the Balti- 
more and Ohio local freight office and the Cin- 
cinnati, Hamilton <fe Dayton local freight 
office at Cincinnati have been of the opinion 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 




M. P. GAVIN 



that they have star bowling teams, but the local 
freight office boys at Ivorydale are from the 
good old state of Missouri, and they desire to 
be shown. 

If either of the above teams think that they 
are in line for first honors the Ivorydale boys 
would like to hear from them. 



Illinois Division 

Correspondent, C. D. Russell, Extra Train 
Dispatcher, Flora, 111. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



M. H. Broughton Chairman, Superintendent 

C. G. Stevens Trainmaster 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic (Sanitation) 

F. Hodapp Road Foreman of Engines 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer 

H. E. Orr Master Carpenter (Sanitation) 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor (Sanitation) 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

C. H. Singer Freight Agent 

C. S. Mitchell Freight Agent 

Rotating Members 

C. F. Bvker Engineer 

L. C. Price Engineer 

H. N. Murray Conductor 

S. Rittenhouse Brakeman 

C. A. McCracken Machinist 

F. Parrish Machinist's Helper 

J. S. Clark Car Inspector 

J. Thome Track Foreman 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, H. W. Brant, Division 
Operator, Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



F. B. Mitchell Superintendent 

R. W. Brown Trainmastei 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

I. E. Clayton Division Operator 

Harry Driver Machinist 

Fred Irey Road Engineer 

F. McKillips Yard Conductor 

P. K. Partee Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 



The late M. P. Gavin entered the service of 
the Cincinnati, Hamilton & Dayton Railway 
Company as a fireman in Dayton yard on 
May 10, 1885. He was promoted to engineer 
in June, 1886, and worked as engineer until 
March 16, 1917, when he suffered a stroke of 
paralysis while on engine 377. He was taken 
to his home, where he died that afternoon. 

Engineer Gavin was a faithful employe, and 
we wish to express our deepest sympathy to his 
bereaved family. 

The late C. P. Cully was born in Louisville, 
Ky . , on January 7, 1870. He entered our service 
as a caller at Cincinnati in July, 1890, was trans- 
ferred to fireman in freight service in June, 
1891, promoted to freight engineer January 1, 
1896, and promoted to passenger engineer in 
January, 1897. Mr. Cully worked faithfully 
up until about a year ago, when he became 
incapacitated for service. He died at his 
home at Elmwood Place, Ohio, on April 5. 
Our deepest sympathy goes out to his bereaved 
widow. 

There was an enthusiastic and patriotic demon- 
stration when an American flag was raised 
over the C. H. & D. yard offices at Lima, on 
April 18. Cary Doan made the presentation 
speech and D. W. Rice gave a brief address on 
"The Declaration of Independence." H. Fell 
expressed the spirit of loyalty of Americans 




ENGINEER C. P. CULLY 



78 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



r^OX RAILROAD 

Emm 



}UR REGULAR RAILWAY DISCOUNT 



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We are making the same discount to Telegraph 
Operators, and to other Railway Employes, that we 
are offering to the various RAILWAY SYSTEMS— 
25% discount — with the additional concession of 
allowing payment to be made monthly if not 
convenient to pay all cash. 

The price of the Fox Typewriter, with regular equip- 
ment, is $100.00, but our Railway Discount of 25% 
reduces this to $75.00. 
Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first 
payment, and pay $5.00 monthly. 5% discount for all cash. 
If $10.00, or more, is sent with order we will include free 
a very fine metal case, in addition to the rubber cover, together 
with a high-class brass padlock for locking case when typewriter is not in use. 

WHAT WE CLAIM FOR THE FOX 

The FOX Typewriter has every feature found in any 
Standard Typewriter ever advertised in the Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine and a number of exclusive features of its own 



The ordinary typewriter will not meet the requirements of the telegraph operator. 

Our New Fox Telegraphers' Model is a revelation in completeness, durability, ease of operation 
and special automatic features. It is fully Visible, has the lightest touch and easiest action 
of any typewriter in the world, makes almost no noise and is built to give a lifetime of service 
and satisfaction. 

The Famous Fox Telegraphers' Keyboard has 44 keys, writing 88 characters, with a 
standard arrangement of the regular letters, numerals, punctuation, etc., but with a number 
of additional characters, absolutely necessary in the work of the telegrapher, and not obtain- 
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These typewriters are strictly new stock, up-to-the-minute in every detail, complete with 
telegraphers' keyboard, any size or style of type, shift or shiftless, rubber covers, two-color 
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Please order direct from this offer, mentioning the Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine, and inclose any 
amount of cash you can spare. Shipment of typewriters will be made same day order is received. 




I'leaae. mention our magazine xrhen writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 79 




Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



so 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of German descent. The C. H. & D. car 
inspectors had charge of the demonstration. 

Clarence Hiatt, tonnage clerk in the superin- 
tendent's office, has accepted a similar position 
with the Baltimore and Ohio at Cleveland. 
W. R. Sauerbrun, formerly with the Big Four, 
has succeeded him. M. S. Williams, Jr., 
formerly mail clerk in the superintendent's 
office, has been promoted to assistant tonnage 
clerk, and Harold McDermot, of Urbana, 
Ohio, is the new mail clerk. 

Assistant superintendent E. W. Hoffman and 
assistant agent Scanlon have moved their 
forces to the new office building at Rossford. 

Our deepest sympathy is extended to all the 
telephone poles, chickens (don't misinterpret 
our meaning) and anything else which may 
chance to grace the highway, for T. J. Regan, 
chief clerk to the superintendent at Dayton, is 
the owner of a new Dodge automobile, and is 
now busily engaged in mastering its intricacies. 
He can be seen "Dodging" around on almost 
any pretty day. 

R. O. ("Slim") Craft and G. C. Stoecklein, of 
the superintendent's office, are making many a 
trip to Cincinnati these days, the purpose of 
which is as yet a mystery. 



Wellston Division 

Correspondent, J. M. Rowland, Timekeeper 
Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

C. R. Elkins Trainmaster 

H. G. Snyder Division Engineer 

Geo. Carr Division Foreman 

J. N. Ginan Conductor 

J. T. McGee Engineer 

M. Roach Car Inspector 

W. A. Bean Machinist 

H. F. Schwab Division Storekeeper 



A new two stall addition to the present round- 
house facilities, which has been contemplated 
for some time, is now under construction at 
East Dayton Terminal. This has been made 
necessary by the consolidation of Perry Street 
yards with East Dayton, and when the new 
building is completed it will greatly facilitate 
the handling of engines at that point. 

Bridge No. 36, a three span frame bent, one 
and a half miles east of Xenia, Ohio, was 
totally destroyed by fire on the night of March 
31. The fire was discovered by a farmer, 
who flagged a four-bagger east at 5.45 a. m. 
The origin of the fire has not been determined. 

The construction of a one car capacity track 
at the New Steam Plant, East Dayton, to 
provide means for disposing of cinders from 
the plant, is contemplated. In the original 
construction of the Steam Plant no provisions 
were made to take care of cinders. 

Sunday passenger train service; was resumed 
on the Wellston and Delphos Divisions on 



April 15. Trains on the Wellston Division 
are to operate between Dayton and Wellston, 
and on the Delphos Division between Dayton 
and East Mandale, stopping at intermediate 
points. Excursion rates will be in effect during 
this Sunday service. 

An eighty-five pound main line crossover was 
removed recently at Slates Mills, combining 
passing track and old storage track into one 
long passing track. 

A telephone has been installed at East Day- 
ton so that trainmen may communicate with 
dispatchers and report the arrival and departure 
of their trains. This will greatly facilitate the 
handling of trains in and out of the yards. 

The station at Delphos, Ohio, which was 
recently damaged by fire, has undergone 
repairs and repainting. 

After twenty-six years of continuous service 
with our Company, H. J. Warneke, operator at 
Jamestown, Ohio, died on April 13. Mr. 
Warneke entered the service in 1891 as an 
operator, and served in the capacity of operator 
and agent at various points on this division. 
For about a year he was operator at Jamestown, 
Ohio. His long career with the Company has 
been a loyal and faithful one and his valuable 
services will be greatly missed. The Company 
and all the boys express their deep sympathy 
to his family and relatives in their great loss. 

H. W. Brant has been appointed trainmaster 
of the Wellston and Delphos Divisions, with 
headquarters at Dayton. Before his appoint- 
ment as trainmaster Mr. Brant, for several 
years, was division operator on the Toledo 
Division of the C. H. & D. His many friends 
wish him success in his new position. 

J. M. Rowland, chief timekeeper of the 
W ells ton and Delphos Divisions, resigned on 
April 15 to accept a position with the Mead 
Pulp & Paper Co., of Dayton. Mr. Rowland 
entered the service of the Company on October 
22, 1907, and for the last five years has been 
chief timekeeper. His host of friends wish 
him success in his new work. 

C. G. Ronk, assistant timekeeper, has been 
promoted to chief timekeeper, vice Mr. Row- 
land. George Keinat, clerk in the Maintenance 
of Way Department has been assigned to the 
position of assistant timekeeper.' 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, George Dixon, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenbhip Section Foreman 

S. H.Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cabbidy Fireman 

J. M. Moore Conductor 




II JUNE — 1917 



Somewhere 

There is a Home For You 



At some place on the Baltimore and Ohio System you have picked a jfly 
spot where you wish to own a home. Probably you have even con- 
sulted a contractor as to the cost of building the kind of home you 
wish to own. 

Possibly you have not seen your way clear to raise the money to pay 
for the property. Just here is where we come in. For over thirty 
years we have joined hands with Baltimore and Ohio employes whw 
wished to stop paying rent and buy their homes. Our help has made 
it possible for thousands of Baltimore and Ohio men to carry out fchei 
plans for the purchase of property or the building of homes. 

Write to Division "S" of the Baltimore and Ohio Relief Depart iinent, 
Baltimore, Md., and find out just how you can secure a home where 
you wish to live. 

The Relief Department has properties at various points on the System 
and will be glad to sell them to employes on the monthly payment plan. 



ii 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



■ 




BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



BALTIMORE, JUNE, 1917 



Number 2 



CONTENTS 



The French Mission en route from Washington to Chicago, 

via the Baltimore and Ohio Frontispiece 4 

Our New Curtis Bay Coal Pier — The Largest and Most Efficient 

Coal Loading Plant in the World 5 

Do Your Duty — Buy a Liberty Bond 14 

The Road to France — Poem Daniel M. Henderson 16 

How Jimmy "Did His Bit"— Prize Story in Fiction Contest. . . Roy G. Clark 17 

American Women Don Overalls and '"Make Good" in Railroad Work 21 

Statement of Pension Feature 25 

Loyal Mr. Way-Bill Enlists for the War 26 

The Use and Abuse of Stationery and Other Office Supplies 

M. K. Barnum, Assistant to Vice-President Operation and Maintenance 27 

Speaking of Patriotism Irvin S. Cobb, of The Vigilantes 28 

Help Win the War by Insisting Upon One Hundred Per Cent. 

Car Utilization 30 

Hard Work the Order of the Day at the Officers' Reser.ve 

Corps Training Camp Robert M. Van Sant 31 

Efficient Station Service the Keynote to Claim Prevention 33 

The Part of Fuel Economy in National Defense 34 

Two Representative Chicago Terminal Employes Roy G. Clark 35 

Promotions, Changes and Other Items of Interest Picked Up 

Along the Line of Road 37 

Editorial 42 

Women's Department 44 

Special Merit 49 

Among Ourselves 53 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of the sheet only. 





i 



Our New Curtis Bay Coal Pier — The Largest 
and Most Efficient Coal Loading 
Plant in the World 



NE Saturday afternoon, not long- 
after our new export coal pier 
in the Curtis Bay Terminal had 
been placed in service, the good 
ship "Maiden" put into Baltimore to 
load a cargo of coal for Boston. 

The wooden coal pier at Curtis Bay 
held the world's record for rapid load- 
ing, but the chief engineer of the 
"Maiden," a Baltimorean and a family 
man, had been accustomed to have a 
few happy days at his fireside while his 
ship was taking on her cargo and always 
looked forward to that opportunity for 
getting reacquainted with his family. 
He had, from time to time, seen the giant 
new pier in the various stages of its con- 
struction and had heard that it would be 
a big improvement over the old one. 
But that knowledge didn't disturb his 
peace of mind — he was still sure of his 
few days at home whenever his ship 
loaded at Baltimore. So as soon as the 
"Maiden" made fast to the new pier 
on that particular Saturday afternoon 
the "chief" turned his department over 
to his assistants, donned his shoregoing 
togs, remarked "see you Monday morn- 
ing," and hastily departed for home and 
the wife and kids. 

Until Sunday noon everything was 
lovely. Then, just as the "chief" was 
sitting down to a large and tender 
chicken with the usual garnishings and 
the prospect of vanilla ice cream in the 
near future, and the further pleasant 
prospect of another night at home, the 
telephone bell jingled. He answered 
the call. 



"Aw, go on — you're kiddin' me," his 
wife heard him shout. " 'Tain't possible 
—what? Oh, all right, I'll be there," 
and he slammed down the receiver. 

"The Old Man says that the ship's 
got her load — and her bunker coal — and 
that we sail in an hour. Who ever heard 
of such a thing — why, its magic! Next 
thing you know we'll be taking coal 
without making port at all, and a man 
will never get a chance to see his folks. 
Magic, I call it." 

And magic it is — the magic of modern 
engineering. 

It is a safe bet that the first man to 
discover that the hard black substance 
that we call coal would burn also dis- 
covered that the easiest way to get it 
from mine to fireplace was to let it slide 
down hill. Since then coal has been 
sliding down hill in greater and greater 
quantities. It has become a more and 
more important commodity. It fur- 
nishes the power that drives the great 
liners that race across the Seven Seas, 
and the grim dreadnaughts that guard 
our coasts. It is the food that gives 
strength to the giant locomotives that 
haul the commerce of the nations across 
the continents of the world. It puts life 
into machinery that accomplishes re- 
sults that a few short decades ago would 
have been regarded as manifestations of 
the workings of witchcraft. It is the 
largest item on the revenue reports of 
many railroads — and a large item on the 
expense accounts of all railroads. But 
until our new coal pier was finished, 
one thing had not changed — coal, when- 




5 



6 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



ever possible, had been allowed to move 
itself by sliding clown hill. 

This is how the change came about. 

In 1914 the wooden pier at Curtis 
Bay had reached its maximum capacity — 
and Baltimore was becoming more and 
more important as a seaport, and, par- 
ticularly, as a coal loading port. The 
same great geographical advantage that 
has made Baltimore a traffic center since 
Colonial days still holds good — it is 
the most westwardly city on tidewater 
on the Atlantic coast, and thus the 
nearest to the coal fields of Pennsylvania, 
West Virginia and Kentucky. Its 
natural harbor facilities are magnificent, 
and its increasing importance as a 
shipping center certain. Our farseeing 
officials knew that no makeshift would 
do — that they must build for the future 
and furnish Baltimore with a coal load- 
ing plant that would not only be capable 
of handling the tremendous tonnage that 
reaches tidewater at Baltimore over our 
lines, but that would load ships with 
such dispatch that the then present 
congestion would be relieved and would 
do much to obviate the possibility of 
future coal congestion in the port. To 



that end a thorough study was made 
of all the coal loading plants on the 
Atlantic seaboard of the United States 
and of the facilities in foreign ports. 
The outcome of this study — and of the 
idea of mechanical instead of gravity 
loading — was the new Curtis Bay Pier, 
the largest and the most efficient coal 
loading plant in the world. It has a 
maximum capacity of 7,000 tons per 
hour, or 12,000,000 tons a year, is built 
of concrete and steel and is electrically 
operated. 

To most of us figures do not mean a 
great deal. So when you read that the 
concrete pier extends 700 feet over the 
water and 400 feet on land and that it is 
116 feet wide, it will, in all probability, 
fail to give you any real idea of its magni- 
tude. Yet, over all, the structure is 
1,100 feet long — and an average city 
block is but 300 feet long. If you think 
of the new coal pier as being almost four 
city blocks long and half a city block 
wide, it will give you some conception of 
its real size. 

The first step in the actual work of 
construction was taken in February, 
1916, when the work of dredging two 




mi l; NEW (I KTIS BAY CO A L PIER IS THE LARGEST AND MOST EFFICIENT COAL 

A YEAR, IS BUILT OF CONCRETE AND 



THE BALTIMORE AXD OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



7 



channels, or slips, 150 feet wide and 
thirty-five feet deep, at what would 
be the sides of the pier and connecting 
with the Government channel, was begun. 
This Government channel, by the way, 
is thirty feet deep, but the slips were 
made thirty-five feet deep to provide 
for a possible deepening of the channel 
and a consequent increase in the size of 
ships that might want to use the pier. 
The material obtained by this dredging 
was used to fill in the yard, 3,000 feet long 
by 220 feet wide. This yard now has 
eleven tracks, and there is room for two 
more when they are needed. The capac- 
ity of the load yard is 320 cars. When 
the additional tracks are installed there 
will be room for 384 cars. 

The first step in the construction 
of the pier proper was the placing of 
1,656 concrete piles, fifteen inches square 
and from forty-five to fifty-eight feet 
long. Each one of these piles, which 
were cast in wooden forms, was rein- 
forced with eight three-quarter inch corru- 
gated steel bars and had a steel shoe at 
the point. The pile was placed at the 
exact spot called for by the plans and 
was then jetted — that is, a high pressure 



pump was placed at the head of the pile, 
the mud and sand forced away and the 
pile dropped into place. After the pile 
had been embedded to within a few feet 
of its final penetration by this method 
it was driven the rest of the way by a 
pile driver. 

All the piles were driven to a pene 
tration of twenty feet, and each had to 
have a tested capacity of not less than 
forty tons. 

Then the piles were stayed in place by 
heavy planking, both length and cross 
ways. The piles were cut off two feet 
five inches above mean water level, 
allowing the steel reinforcing bars to 
protrude. Then forms for the trans- 
verse and longitudinal girders were built 
on the staying timbers, and the concrete 
girders, reinforced by steel bars in the 
same manner as the piles, cast, the rein- 
forcing bars of the piles locking into the 
girders. The concrete deck, from eight 
to ten inches thick, also reinforced by 
steel bars, was then " poured" and the 
pier proper was finished. The concrete 
for this work was mixed on scows and 
poured by means of derricks. 

In the meantime work on the other 




1— THE 15-INCH CONCRETE PILES WERE CAST IN WOODEN MOULDS AND REINFORCED 

WITH STEEL RODS 

This work was done near the site of the new coal pier. The old pier can be seen in the background 




5— FOUR MONTHS LATER—THE PIER HEARING COMPLETION. THIS PICTURE SHOWS THE 
CONCRETE GIRDERS! AND DECK WHICH SUPPORTS THE COAL LOADING MACHINERY 



10 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




facilities that are part of the titanic coal 
loading plant was going forward. A 
thaw house, 420 feet long and forty feet 
wide, with a capacity of twenty cars, 
was built. It is of timber construction, 
concreted both inside and outside, and 
is thoroughly fireproof. Steam is ob- 
tained from the power plant, through 
an eight inch pipe line 1,800 feet long, 
and is delivered to radiators on the 
second floor of the thaw house at a 
pressure of 125 pounds. The cold air, 
by being drawn through the radiators, 
is heated to a temperature of 220 degrees. 
If the cars are frozen solid it takes about 
an hour to thaw them, but under usual 
winter weather conditions the thaw 
house has a thawing capacity of about 
forty cars an hour. 

To secure fresh water a well twenty 
feet in diameter was sunk to a depth 
of forty-five feet, and from the bottom 
of this open well four six-inch wells 
were driven to a depth of 100 feet. For 
fire fighting a well fifteen feet in diameter 
was carried down fourteen feet below 
mean low water, a thirty-six-inch pipe 
communicating with the bay. 

The power house is a model of up-to- 



date design and equipment. It has four 
Babcock and Wilcox tubular boilers 
equipped with Taylor stokers, with 
automatic control. There is a detached 
fuel supply bin for the power house, with 
a conveyor belt running to a storage bin 
above the boilers, from which the fuel is 
spouted directly into the stokers. 
Another interesting feature is a modern 
ash-handling equipment, by which ashes 
are thrown out, by a steam jet, to a tank 
outside of the building. From the tank 
they are dumped into cars for removal. 
This power plant will supplant several 
other sources of power and supply all 
the power required by the Company in 
the Curtis Bay District. 

At the land end of the pier are two car 
dumpers and storage and balancing bins. 
The tracks running from the yard to the 
dumpers are on a descending grade. A 
loaded car is released by a switchman and 
runs to the foot of the "barney" pit, 
which is under the track near where it 
starts to run up grade to the dumpers. 
There the car is caught by the "barney" 
or "pig" (which has an arm that catches 
behind it) and is drawn, by cable, up the 
ten per cent, incline to the car dumpers. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



11 



There it is clamped and turned upside 
down, apparently with the same ease 
that a housewife empties a scuttle of coal 
into the kitchen stove. The coal, to 
decrease breakage, is delivered into a 
counter weighted apron, which is raised 
when the car is dumped. Then the apron 
is lowered to permit the coal to slide 
freely to the belts which convey it to the 
vessel being loaded. The empty car is 
turned right side up and runs down an 
incline to the yard, up a shorter incline 
to a kick-back and hence back to the 
yard — all by gravity. If it is not desired 
to load the coal at once it is carried to 
one of two storage bins of 2,500 tons 
capacity each. 

There are three belts to each car 
dumper, each sixty inches wide and, 
running at a speed of 500 feet a minute, 
with a loading capacity of 2,000 tons an 
hour. Two in each group run out on 
the pier to a loading tower. The other 
runs to a balancing bin. These con- 
veyor belts are among the most inter- 
esting features of the pier. They are 
made of a composition of rubber and 
fibre and are tremendously strong. They 
are concave shaped and run on curved 
rollers spaced four feet apart. Although 



perfectly smooth the belts carry the coal 
up the incline to the loading towers with- 
out trouble. 

When the pier is running at full capac- 
ity the operation of the car dumpers 
must not be interrupted. So when it 
becomes necessary to stop a loading tower 
to shift it to another position, the coal is 
temporarily placed in the balancing bin. 
From there it is taken by a loading or 
trimming tower and loaded to the vessel. 

There are four loading towers and two 
trimming towers. 

The loading towers travel along the 
pier on tracks. They are equipped with 
a cage supporting a shuttle ram. This 
cage can be raised or lowered to suit the 
height of the vessel being loaded, thus 
reducing breakage to a minimum. The 
cage has a variation in height of twenty- 
seven feet, its minimum height above 
water being fifteen feet. The shuttle 
ram, which can be run out on either side 
of the pier, has a reach of forty-five feet, 
and works in and out at right angles with 
the direction of the tower. This allows 
a hatch to be loaded uniformly and 
reduces trimming. 

The tower operator has a comfortable 
glass enclosed house on the shuttle. 




HOW THE COAL IS CARRIED FROM THE CAR DUMPERS TO THE BALANCING BINS 



12 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




COAL BEING LOADED INTO HOLD OF VESSEL 
FROM LOADING TOWER 
Note the short drop — which means reduced breakage 



From there he controls the tower as 
easily as a motorman runs a car. The 
shuttle belt is first started. When this 
is running at full speed the main belt 
and the feeders automatically start. 
The shuttle belt runs at a greater speed 
than the main belt and the main belt 
faster than the feeders, so there is no 
danger of flooding the main or shuttle 
belts. In the superintendent's office 
there is a master control, which enables 
him to establish the maximum speed at 
which the belts are run. 

There is another interesting device 
to overcome breakage, called the low- 
erator. This is used when lump coal is 
being loaded. This piece of machinery 
is built on the same plan as a popular 
children's -eashore toy — buckets attached 
to an endless chain. But instead of 
handling a few ounces of sand this 
machine lowers tons of coal into a 
ship's bunkers with a drop of but three 
feet. 

There are two trimming towers, one 
on each side of the pier. The coal for 
these towers comes from the balancing 
bin on belts forty-eight inches wide, 
which have a capacity, running at a 



speed of 500 feet a minute, of 1,500 tons 
an hour. The trimming towers have 
swinging booms forty-five feet long 
attached at their base to turn-tables. 
These booms can be moved in a circle 
on a horizontal plane and have a vertical 
variation of thirty-five degrees each way 
from the horizontal. 

While the loading towers are loading 
the cargo coal the trimming towers are 
at work on the bunker coal and when the 
loading tower has finished its work the 
trimming tower completes the slow work 
on the vessel, releasing the loading tower 
for work on another vessel. 

The coal dumping machines are run 
by steam power, but all the other ma- 
chinery is electrically operated. The 
functions of the pier are interlocked and 
controlled electrically, with push buttons 
located every twenty feet on each belt 
conveyor runway. The "Safety" value 
of this method of control, by which all 
moveable parts of the tower, belt and 
feeding can be stopped instantly by any- 
one, is of great value. 

In spite of the fact that most of the coal 
that is loaded at Curtis Bay is of the 
soft variety there is remarkably little 
dust and the whole plant works with the 
smooth efficiency of a perfect machine. 




THE CAR DUMPER TURNS A GONDOLA 
UPSIDE DOWN 
As easily as a house- wife empties a coal scuttle 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



13 



The entire improvement was originated manager, and H. A. Line, the present 

and designed complete by the engineering chief engineer of the Company. Asso- 

department of the Baltimore and Ohio, ciated with them were W. S. Bouton, 

Upon the resignation of chief engineer engineer of bridges; J. H. Davis, electrical 

F. L. Stuart from the Baltimore and engineer; M. A. Long, architect and 

Ohio last July, the work was taken up assistant to the chief engineer; F. C. 

and completed under the direction of Thornley, consulting engineer, and J.. T. 

his successor, R. N. Begien, now general Wilson, district engineer. 

■ _ _« ■ — w 

£4, . „ „„-_ „ . : Hit 

I 

Committee on Public Information Offers 
Its Services to Railroad Men 



IN order that the public may be thoroughly informed 
upon the various activities of the Government during 
the present crisis, President Wilson has established a 
Committee on Public Information. 

This Committee is composed of the Secretary of 
War, the Secretary of State, and the Secretary of the 
Navy, and has as its chairman, Mr. George Creel. Its 
services are at the call of any who may desire to be 
informed upon the affairs of the Government, as they 
relate to the present crisis. 

It is peculiarly essential that those in charge of rail- 
road affairs should be well posted upon Government 
problems, and this is therefore addressed to you with the 
hope that you will avail yourself whenever you desire of 
the services of this Committee. 

All inquiries should be addressed to L. M. Harris, 
8 Jackson Place, Washington, D. C. 



ff ■ — — 

*»*V — •" — •" — "" — « — "" — ■" — "" — ■ — — "» — "" — •" — "" — "» — "» — " — « — ■■ — »- — »» — »« — «» — «" — »« — »» — ■» — »« — »» — r j£"i 




Do Your Duty 



The Baltimore and Ohio offers its employes an opportunity to 
help win the war by buying one or more Liberty Bonds and paying 
for them from their future earnings. 

Read this letter! 

THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO RAILROAD COMPANY 

OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT 

Baltimore, Md., May 31, 1917. 
UNITED STATES LIBERTY LOAN OF 1917 

To All Officers and Employes: 

Believing that everyone in the Company's service will consider it not only a 
privilege but a patriotic duty to become the owner of a certain amount of the 
bonds about to be issued by the United States Government, to aid in carrying on 
the War for democracy and human rights, and recognizing that some — perhaps 
many — of the employes may not have funds immediately available in the amount 
that they would desire to suscribe, The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company 
has arranged to secure an allotment of the bonds for distribution among its 
employes upon the following basis : 

Upon request of any employe The Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company 
will advance the whole or any part of the cost of the bond or bonds desired, at 
the same rate of interest which the bonds bear, to be repaid to the Company 
in monthly installments by such employe from future earnings. 

The bonds will be issued on June 15, 1917, by the United States Govern- 
ment in denominacions of $50.00 and upwards, bearing interest at V/f/o per 
annum, payable semi-annually on the 15th day of December and June. If 
another loan is made during the War bearing a higher rate of interest, the Govern- 
ment promises that the holders of bonds of the present issue shall have the privi- 
lege of exchanging the same upon such terms and conditions as shall be prescribed 
by the Secretary of the Treasury, into an equal par amount of bonds bearing the 
higher rate of interest. Both principal and interest are exempt from all taxation 
except estate or inheritance taxes. 

The attached memorandum explains the loan in greater detail and shows 
how your subscription may be made, and to whom you may apply for further 
information. 

I feel confident that all employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Company will 
desire to do their part in this great emergency and will welcome the opportunity 
to subscribe for these bonds, thus showing their patriotism by lending part of 
their savings to the Government at the same time securing for themselves a good 
investment. 



President 



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Buy a Liberty Bond 




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An employe who desires to purchase "LIBERTY LOAN BONDS" and pay 
for same in monthly installments deducted from the pay roll should obtain a 
subscription blank from his chief clerk, superintendent, trainmaster, yardmaster, 
road foreman or shop foreman and deliver to the nearest agency or forward 
to the treasurer at Baltimore. 

The Company will hold the bonds for the subscriber until the completion of 
the necessary payments, at which time the bond or bonds become the property 
of the employe. 

The interest coupons for the first year will be detached and applied in part 
payment and in adjustment of interest at three and one-half per cent. 

SCHEDULE OF PAYMENTS 



EACH $50.00 BOND 



1 1 monthly payments of $4.25 each. . . . $46.75 

12th installment $3.25 

Less interest adjustment 97 

Making final payment 2.28 

Total cash payment $49.03 



EACH $100.00 BOND 



1 1 monthly payments of $8.50 each. . . . $93.50 

12th installment $6.50 

Less interest adjustment 1 .94 

Making final payment. . 4.56 

Total cash payment $98.06 



Should more than one bond of either denomination be desired, the payments 
would be increased according to the number of bonds subscribed for. 

Should an employe leave the service of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
Company before completing the payments necessary to purchase the bond or 
bonds subscribed for, the payments may be continued in cash until the bonds are 
fully paid for or, if desired, the subscriber will be relieved from the obligation to 
make further payments, and the money paid on account will be refunded to the 
subscriber. 

It is important that the application blanks be returned to the Treasurer of 
the Company prior to July 1, 1917. 

For further information apply to the office of Division Superintendent, or 
to the Treasurer at Baltimore. 




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The Road to France 



By Daniel M. Henderson 

prize winning poem in the patriotic poem contest of the Natio 
of New York) 

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THANK God our liberating lance 
Goes flaming on the way to France! 
To France — the trail the Gurkhas found ! 
To France — old England's rallying ground! 
To France — the path the Russians strode! 
To France — the Anzacs' glory road! 
To France — where our Lost Legion ran 
To fight and die for God and man! 
To France — with every race and breed 
That hates Oppression's brutal creed! 

Ah, France — how could our hearts forget 
The path by which came Lafayette? 
How could the haze of doubt hang low 
Upon the road of Rochambeau? 
How was it that we missed the way 
Brave Joffre leads us along today? 
At last, thank God! At last we see 
There is no tribal Liberty! 
No beacon lighting just our shores! 
No freedom guarding but our doors! 
The flame she kindled for our sires 
Burns now in Europe's battle fires! 
The soul that led our fathers west 
Turns back to free the world's oppressed! 

Allies, you have not called in vain! 
We share your conflict and your pain! 
"Old Glory," through new stains and rents, 
Partake of Freedom's sacraments! 
Into that hell his will creates 
We drive the foe; his lusts, his hates! 
Last come, we will be last to stay — 
Till Right has had her crowning day! 
Replenish, comrades, from our veins 
The blood the sword of despot drains, 
And make our eager sacrifice 
Part of the freely rendered price 
You pay to lift humanity — 
You pay to make our brothers free! 
See, with what proud hearts we advance — 
To France! 



How Jimmy "Did His Bit" 

By Roy G. Clark 

Assistant Abstracter, Chicago Terminal 
(Prize Story in Fiction Contest) 



gj^wlIMMY QUINN swung off the rear 
HH | J end of No. 97 as it pulled into 
Ij^lSj the passing siding at Otis Junc- 
BgaBBB i tion and walked over to the 
crossing flagman's box, where he knew 
he would find his old friend, Dad 
Beardsley. Dad and he were old cron- 
ies, despite the discrepancy of forty years 
in their ages; Jimmy had spent many 
hours sitting beside Dad's little cyclone 
stove, smoking his Plowboy mixture and 
absorbing the older man's views on life, 
gathered during a long and versatile ser- 
vice in railroad work. Dad possessed a 
wealth of common sense and philosophy 
and had a peculiarly picturesque way of 
presenting it. And because Jimmy had 
learned to come to the old man with 
every perplexing question, he hurried 
over to his little shanty today; for Jimmy 
was worried. 

"Hello, Dad," he said, opening the 
door. "I'm going to enlist!" 

"Enlist, are you?" Dad replied, ap- 
pearing as little surprised at Jimmy's 
abrupt entrance and broaching of an 
entirely new subject as though they had 
been talking for an hour. "So you're 
going to enlist. And why?" 

"You're a great one to ask me that!" 
Jimmy answered, with some heat. "You! 
— with all your preaching of patriotism 
and of standing by the flag — you ask me 
why I'm going to enlist! I'll tell you 
why. I'm ashamed to appear on the 
streets today. I think everybody I meet 
is wondering why I've stayed home, 
making good money and not risking my 
precious hide. And it ain't only shame, 
either, Dad — you know that. I ought 



to be with the flag. There's George 
Butts and Fred Cain and a lot of the 
other fellows risking their lives in France 
now, fighting for us — for me! I'm going 
to do my bit." 

The old man opened the cyclone stove 
door, poked up the fire, deposited a lump 
of coal on it and then motioned Jimmy 
to the vacant chair beside him. Jimmy 
reluctantly sat down. 

"Let's see," Dad ruminated. "Seems 
to me you was up before the registration 
board and they figured you was more 
valuable right here at home on the road 
than over there fighting — to say nothing 
of you having your mother to support. 
Seems as though I recollect they said 
they could get lots of soldiers, but 
that they was going to have an awful 
time getting enough freight men on the 
railroads here at home. Seems as though 
they wanted you pretty bad right where 
you are. Of course they don't know 
what they're doing." 

"Oh, I know all about that," Jimmy 
broke in. "That may all be true, but 
it ain't fighting! I ain't risking a thing 
here, while the boys at the front are 
running all the chances. It's just plain 
every-day work with me, as though there 
wasn't any war. I ain't doing my share 
and I'm going to resign and enlist, that's 
all." 

"Wait a minute," said the old man. 
"Let's figure this thing out. Let's sup- 
pose your best friend was having an 
almighty tough tussle with another chap. 
For the sake of argument let's say they 
was fighting with bricks — although they 
may not have been Irishmen, at that. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



10 



Let's say you go over and offer to help 
lick the other geezer, and your friend 
says he'll lick him alone, all right, if he 
can only get enough bricks. He asks 
you to keep supplying him with bricks. 
Wouldn't you be a blasted fool to insist 
on fighting, when you'd both run out of 
bricks in a little while? Wouldn't it be 
better to keep supplying him with the 
bricks he needs?" Dad lit his pipe, 
which had gone out through lack of at- 
tention. "Go on," said Jimmy. "I'm 
listening." 

"Well, Uncle Sam is your best friend. 
He's having the worst tussle of his life 
with a mighty strong enemy. He can 
get enough men to fight for him — if he's 
supplied with enough stuff for them to 
fight with. He's got to have the bricks! 
And that's why a lot of us have got to 
stay at home and keep the stuff moving 
to him. If we all go over and fight, 
soon we'll all run out of bricks. And 
when the war is won, won't the fellows 
who kept the supplies going over to our 
soldiers deserve a lot of credit, too? I 
know how you feel, Jimmy; handling 
loaded shells from the plant up on Wil- 
son's spur don't seem quite like charging 
the enemy's trenches, but it's just as 
necessary. We can't all be heroes of the 
battlefield — there's a lot of heroes in 
every war, including the women folks, 
right at home. Of course you'd rather be 
over there, but — what's wrong?" 

Dad jumped from his chair and pointed 
to the station, where a group of men were 
talking excitedly. Jimmy ran to the 
door and stopped a caller as he was run- 
ning past the flagman's box. 

"What's wrong?" he asked. 

"Twelve cars of shells broke lose up 
at the plant on Wilson's spur a minute 
ago," he cried. "They just telephoned 
down. There's enough stuff in them to 
blow up the whole town when they hit 
here. And they'll be going some, too, 
after traveling down that eight mile 
grade. There ain't a switch on the whole 
spur to ditch them in. I've got to tell the 
town folks to clear out." 

"Someone up there must have forgot 
to close the switch or the derail," said 
Dad. "Eight miles up and nothing to 
slop them! And the whole town blown 



up, including twelve cars of shells, just 
when the country needs them the most." 

"They're going to send an engine 
up to meet them," said Jimmy. "They've 
got the 4242 out on the lead to the spur. 
There'll be a grand smash somewhere up 
the hill and a brand new engine will be 
gone, too." 

Dad's shoulders straightened and his 
eyes sparkled with a light that hadn't 
shone there since one memorable day 
about fifty-four years ago, when he had 
turned a panic into a rally at Gettysburg. 

"Jimmy," he said, "let's go up on the 
4242 and meet those cars. There's a 
hundred to one chance we can make it. 
If we can get to Prince Crossing before 
they come through Red Gap we can see 
them on the big bend in time to start 
back and ease them off. Come on, lad! 
It will be better than charging trenches." 

Jimmy needed no urging. With one 
accord they ran over to the engine, and 
before the gaping crowd on the station 
platform realized what had happened 
they had the 4242 started up the spur. 
She was a new locomotive, far too heavy 
for the light track, especially at the rate 
Dad was pushing her, but fortune was with 
them and the rails held. Up the grade 
and around the curves she pounded, with 
Jimmy anxiously timing every second 
and watching every curve ahead. If the 
cars had gathered too great momentum 
they would beat the 4242 to Red Gap, and a 
smash-up would be inevitable. Dad and 
Jimmy fully realized this, and knew that 
the odds were against them. All they 
could do was to push the 4242 to the 
limit and pray that the track would hold. 

A minute later Dad slowed down for 
Prince Crossing, and as they emerged 
from the cut in the hill they heard a low 
rumble above them; watching Red Gap 
anxiously they saw the cars rounding the 
curve almost a mile ahead. They were 
in time! 

"At the rate they're coming we've got 
about a minute," Dad cried. "Get out 
on the pilot, lad, and couple on when 
they catch up to us. We're going to 
stop 'em!" 

He reversed and opened the throttle. 
The 4242 seemed to sense what was ex- 
pected of her and took hold nobly. 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Faster and faster her drivers revolved, 
while nearer and nearer the drunkenly 
swaying cars approached, until the differ- 
ence in the speed of the engine and the 
cars was so little that they gently bumped 
the swaying pilot and coupled. Jimmy 
climbed up on the first car and set the hand 
brakes, while Dad gently applied the air 
on the engine. Dad was an old engineer 
and he knew the ticklish cargo he was 
handling. In a moment he had the 
train under control and in three minutes 
they quietly swung around the last curve 
into Otis Junction. 

Yes, both Dad and Jimmy received 
plenty of publicity and congratulatory 
letters; but what they prize most is a 
letter that today is framed and hanging 
in Dad's little crossing shanty, and which 



he will be certain to show to you should 
you happen to enter. It reads: 

Washington, D. C. 

Permit me to express to you and Mr. Quinn 
my gratitude, and the gratitude of our soldiers, 
for your brave act in stopping a runaway train 
of loaded shells on February 1. It will inter- 
est you to know that these particular shells 
were of a special caliber, and made for our new 
heavy ordnance. Had they been delayed these 
batteries would have been inactive at a very 
critical time. 

Let me also say that the men engaged in 
railroad service who, in the ordinary routine 
of their day's work, exert every effort toward 
transporting with safety and dispatch the goods 
entrusted to them are taking no small part in 
the winning of this war. 

I beg of you to accept my sincerest personal 
regards. 

It is signed by the President of the 
United States. 



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What YOU Can Do For The Red Cross 



The Red Cross Needs Members: 



All it can get. Its present membership is less than 750,000. It should have 
1 1 20,000,000. Proportionately Japan has seven Red Cross members to our one and has 
f 1 contributed $10,000,000 to our $1,000,000. The American Red Cross maintains the most 
j j efficient hospital and nursing service for war in the world. 



The Red Cross Needs Supplies 

All it can get— surgical dressings, ba 
These must be made by women, by millions of women doing their bits in this way. 

The Red Cross Needs Baltimore and Ohio Men and Women! 



Every member of the railroad family. There are chapters in most of the cities and 
many of the towns on our System. IF THERE IS NO RED CROSS CHAPTER IN 
YOUR COMMUNITY, ORGANIZE ONE. For advice address E. H. Wells, Director 
of Chapters, The American Red Cross, Washington, D. C. 



1 1 The Red Cross Needs Money: 

11 

All it can get — $100,000,000. There should be no limit to American generosity. It § § 
| | must provide for the hospital requirements of American soldiers and sailors and for § | 
1 § the care of their dependent families. It must bear aid to the Allies, who daily have I § 
| | greater need for additional hospitals, doctors and nurses. 



I I The Red Cross Needs Workers: 

If II 
All it can get. The larger its usefulness the more workers it will need at home — j f 
to make supplies, to collect them from every city and hamlet, to mobilize them in j j 
central warehouses, to ship them to the front. 



i i 
i t 

All it can get— surgical dressings, bandages, and clothing for soldiers in hospitals. j I 



I I 

II 
5 I 



American Women Don Overalls and "Make 
Good" in Railroad Work 



f j 1AST month's Magazine told of 
[ L/ I the enlistment of the "first 

US5d hundred" women workers under 
" SB9 the industrial banner of the 
Baltimore and Ohio. Since that time 
their numbers have increased greatly 
and it seems certain that women will 
occupy a most important place in the 
war time industry of our railroad and of 
the entire country. Many of our male 
employes have already answered the call 
to the colors. Directly or indirectly, 
the positions of most of them have been 
filled by the employment of women. 
When the selective draft law goes into 
effect there will be many more such 
vacancies and it is more than probable 



that they will be filled by the employ- 
ment of these new workers. 

That they will be able to perform 
satisfactorily the work they undertake 
seems assured by the record they have 
made to date, as well as by the suc- 
cess of their sisters abroad. In all the 
countries engaged in the war women 
have taken the places of many of the 
men who are fighting. Many are em- 
ployed on the English railroads, on 
traction lines, as motor truck drivers, 
as policewomen, in agriculture and in 
the munition works. 

One English woman had five sons at 
the front — a contribution to the cause that 
most mothers would have considered 




THIS YOUNG WOMAN OPERATES A DRILL PRESS IN THE CAR DEPARTMENT 
AT LOCUST POINT, BALTIMORE 



21 



22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



quite sufficient. But not this patriotic 
woman. She wanted to do her "bit" 
herself, so she obtained a position making 
shells in a munition factory. She worked 
hard and last winter received her reward. 
It was a letter from one of her sons in 
France and in it he expressed the opinion 
that by her work she was " killing more 
Germans than your five sons." 

But it is not only the woman who 
works in a munition plant who is doing 
her share in helping to win the war. 
The woman who, even indirectly, re- 
leases a man for military service is adding 
to the fighting power of her country. A 
case of this kind came to light in the 
employment Of a woman as a crossing 
guard on the Indiana Division. She 
replaced a man who was a cripple — 
exempt from military service. But he, 
in turn, took the place of an able-bodied 
man, who enlisted. Indirectly, this 
woman sent a man to the front. 

Lorain was perhaps the first place on 
the System to add the names of women 
workers in other than clerical and 
care-taking positions to the pay roll. 
The other divisions were not far behind, 
however, and now women are regularly 
employed on practically every division 
on the System. 




1M 



MISS GEORGIA ROSENWINGKLE 
The first womiin shop employe at Mcturt C!sre 




" SKIRTS ? THEY'RE IN THE WAY ! " 

Say the competent women who are doing the work of 
men called to the Nation's Service 



In addition to the help in solving the 
problem of war time labor, the employ- 
ment of women in these new lines of 
endeavor, say men who are making a 
study of woman in industry, is a sign of 
the changed attitude of the world toward 
the wage earning woman, and will open 
to women many opportunities to improve 
their position in life. A recent applicant 
at the general offices in Baltimore said 
that she was anxious to obtain a position 
formerly held by a man, at a man's 
wages, and added that she thought that 
men would appreciate the efforts of 
honest women to earn their living and 
treat them with proper respect, whether 
they wore skirts, bloomers or overalls. 
To anyone familiar with the high stand- 
ard of Baltimore and Ohio courtesy it 
goes without saying that these new 
workers will be treated with the respect 
due a woman, no matter what her posi- 
tion, and that everything possible will 
be done for the comfort and welfare of 
these new railroaders. 

The women who are doing shop work 
seem to have decided upon overalls as 
the most suitable dress for their work. 
Skirts, of* course, would be cumbersome 
and in many cases dangerous. When the 
first overall-clad women appeared ready 
Cor work their male fellow workers were 
naturally inclined to stare and perhaps 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



23 



to smile a little. Now the novelty has 
worn off and the woman shop worker is 
accepted as a matter of course. 

Miss Katherine Nauman, of Baltimore, 
was the first woman to apply for a posi- 
tion in our Locust Point Terminal. 
She was engaged and helped obtain 
several other women for work in the 
shops and yards. Her work was so 
satisfactory that she was promoted, and 
she is now the first forewoman ever 
employed by the Baltimore and Ohio. 
At this writing there are twenty-one 
women employed at Locust Point. They 
do various kinds of work, from picking 
up scrap to running a drill press, and all 
seem happy and contented. One young 
lady, employed in the waste reclaiming 
shop, was asked if the dirt and grease 
was not unpleasant. 



"Oh, I don't mind a little dirt," she 
replied. "It's easy enough to wash off. 
It's pay dirt, too. I get more now 
than I ever earned in my life before." 

The history of Mount Clare Shops 
goes back to the days of horse pulled 
cars and stone ties. But a new chapter 
was started when Miss Georgia Rosen- 
win ckle went to work packing journal 
boxes. Miss Rosenwinckle - said that 
she was in earnest and wanted to show 
people that American women were equal 
to any call that might be made upon 
them, and that she was willing to start 
at the bottom and work her way up. 

Women are now working in the shops 
at Benwood, Cumberland, Lorain, Chilli- 
cothe, Wheeling, Lima and in the 
Zanesville Reclamation Plant. They are 
employed as flagwomen at Wheeling, 




TWELVE — COUNT 'EM! PRIOR TO THE WAR WE WOULD HAVE TAKEN THEM FOR A MUSICAL 
COMEDY CHORUS. BUT THEY ARE WOMEN WORKERS AT LOCUST POINT, BALTIMORE 



24 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




A CROSSING WATCH W OMAN AT LAWRENCE- 
VILLE, ON THE ILLINOIS DIVISION 

Huntington, New Albany, Parkersburg, 
on the Staten Island Division and at 
other places. (One of these flagwomen 
is said to powder her nose before each 
train is due.) They are filling clerical 
positions in the Cleveland freight house 
and at many terminals and, of course, 
in the general offices at Baltimore. 
They are engaged in cleaning engines 
and cars at Lexington and Newark, 
Ohio, working as oilers at Connellsville, 
Pittsburgh and New Castle and as coach 
cleaners in the Cincinnati Terminals and 
at Baltimore. And everywhere they are 
doing their work well, and doing their 
"bit" in helping to win the war. 



Wasted Paper 

T'S a peculiar thing/' said the 
chief clerk of a large department 
to the writer, "what a contrast 
is shown in the attitude of our 
officials and some of our employes on the 
all important subject of economy. 

"Take for instance the question of 
stationery. The interdepartmental mem- 
orandums whrch we get from executive 
offices are almost invariably written on 
inexpensive second sheets — sometimes 
on the back of paper which has already 
had one side written on. In contrast, 
just look at this!" 

And he handed me a letter which was 
enclosed in a large envelope. It was a 
full size printed letter head of one of our 
officials and had about two lines of script 
on it, making some unimportant request. 
The note might just as well have been 
written on a half size second sheet and 
enclosed in a smaller envelope, with a 
probable saving of about ninety per cent, 
in the operation. 

"I find," continued my informant, 
"that our messenger and mail boys are 
extremely careless in this respect. We 
have to supervise them very closely in 
this office, but we have rigid rules for the 
handling of envelopes and stationery 
and believe that through them we are 
making a substantial saving. And the 
nice part of it is that it is just as easy and 
convenient — in most cases, more con- 
venient — to use inexpensive paper and 
the proper size envelope. It not only 
saves stock, but also weight in handling 
the mail through our mailing department. 

" I wish every chief clerk on the System 
would investigate how his stationery and 
mail are being handled and put into 
effect some simple rules for economy." 



Win a Prize with Safety Article! 

Ten dollars is being awarded each quarter of the year to the employe 
submitting the best original article on Accident Prevention. The present contest 
period ends June 30. Send your contribution to John T. Broderick, Supervisor 
Special Bureaus, Baltimore and Ohio Building, Baltimore. 




Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of May, 1917, and to whom pensions 
have been granted: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



Aid, Christian 

Care, William H 

Donohue, Jeremiah 

Grady, John E 

Green, Thomas E 

Henry, Andrew J 

Manuel, William H. H.. 

Plaine, Jesse 

Schoenberger, Joseph P. 
Stansberry, Wesley 



Laborer 

Conductor 
Boilermaker . . 
Conductor 
Baggageman. . . 

Trackman 

Baggageman. . . 
Brakeman 

Engineer 

Oil Cup Filler. 



M. P.... 
C. T. ... 
M. P.... 
C. T. . 
C. T. 
M. of W. 
C. T. . . . 
C. T. . . . 
C. T. ... 
M. P. . . 



Ohio 

Cumberland 
Baltimore. . . 

Newark 

Ohio 

Cumberland 
Baltimore. . . 
Baltimore. . . 

Indiana 

Monongah. . . 



10 

26 
44 
44 
32 
50 
48 
26 
55 
35 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1916, over $296,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,056,616.15. 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number of years, the following employes have 



died 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION 



Chambers, E. B.. . . 
Robb, Charles G... 

Bell, William 

Harker, Daniel. . . . 
Young, Harry J. . 
Evans, William P. . 
Clarke, James P. . . 

Myers, John H 

George, Thomas... 
Wilkening, August. 



Agent 

Laborer 

Clerk 

Engineer 

Watchman 

Switch Tender 

Crossing Watchman. 

Conductor 

Crossing Watchman. 
Cabinet Maker 



DEPART- 


DIVISION 


DATE 


OF 


YEARS OF 


MENT 


DEATH 


SERVICE 


C. T. . . 


Cumberland . 


April 25, 


1917.. 


34 


M. P.. 


Cleveland 


April 28, 


1917.. 


21 


Frt. Trf. 


All 


May 11, 


1917.. 


30 


C. T. . . 


Philadelphia . . 


April 8, 


1917.. 


27 


M. of W. 


Connellsville . 


May 12, 


1917.. 


12 


C. T. . . 


Newark 


May 10, 


1917.. 


42 


C. T. .. 


Baltimore .... 


May 23, 


1917.. 


36 


C. T. .. 


Baltimore .... 


May 25, 


1917.. 


43 


C. T. . . 


New Castle. . . 


May 22, 


1917.. 


22 


M. P.. . . 


Baltimore .... 


May 25, 


1917.. 


26 



25 





Freight Claim Department — 
Cooperative Claim Prevention 



Loyal Mr. Way-Bill Enlists 
for the War 








<pub\ 












"I've enlisted for the war," said Mr. Way-Bill. "I want to 
take time from thoughts of freight handling to tell you why I 
signed up. 

"Ever since I read the war address of President Wilson, the 
refrain of the 'Boys of '61' — 'We are coming, Father Abraham, 
three hundred thousand men,' has been marching through my 
mind. I cannot help but continue — 

" 'Yes, from the workshop and the railroad, and the tunnel by 
the glen, we are coming, Father Daniel, our sixty thousand men.' 

"That's all of the Baltimore and Ohio boys, isn't it? Just as 
soon as I could break loose I went down and signed my name 
again to the railroad muster roll. Boys, I wanted to show you 
that Mr. Way-Bill is loyal. We've got to help to run the rail- 
road during the war and I've signed up for the war. 

"I ain't going to be a slacker, but I am going to do my bit for 
the Nation and the Baltimore and Ohio. 

"All of my energies are under martial law. We will say, 
'Ours not to make reply,' but to go to it! 

" 'Ours but to do' (the railroad doesn't want us to die — but 
it does want us to keep on living and doing). 

"Just now is when loyalty is going to count. It means getting 
in line; keeping step; keeping the rails clear for the passage of 
food and supplies; being minute men to respond; and sharp- 
shooters, able to kill off disloyal thoughts. We're going to be 
reinforced concrete and steel underframe. 

"No matter where we were born, or whether we sing 'The 
Star Spangled Banner,' 'The Wearing of the Green,' 'The Mar- 
seillaise,' or some other patriotic lyric, we'll be the boys to figure 
right, to load and handle freight right, to drive a spike straight 
and tamp a tie well, to squint true over a level, to hammer hard 
in the shop, or with clear head to pull a throttle. 

"Always will come the answer: 

'Yes, Father Daniel, 'ere your heart takes another throb, 
Just pause and colint us, we're sixty thousand - on the job.' " 



r ly voice is still for war on Freight Claims. 

very Freight Claim is an alien enemy to revenue. 
Dollars for necessities, but not one cent for claims. 



//. Irving Martin, 



26 



The Use and Abuse of Stationery 
and Other Office Supplies 



By M. K. Barnum 

Assistant to Vice-President Operation and Maintenance 



HHE fact that during the calendar 
year 1916 the Baltimore and 
Ohio System spent for stationery 
and printing about $410,000.00, 
shows the possibility of large savings 
to be effected if reasonable care is 
exercised in the ordering and use of 
stationery and small office supplies for 
the, approximately, 2,000 offices on the 
System. 

The above amount does not include 
typewriters, computing machines, tickets, 
passenger and freight tariffs, time-tables, 
passes and some other similar items. 

As an illustration of the large cost of 
small items used in quantities, the 
Stationer sent out, during the calendar 
year 1916, 8,300 pounds of common pins, 
valued at $5,677.65, making a total of 
25,400,000 pins. 

Some of the other small articles, 
furnished in large quantities, were the 
following: 

611,159 pencils 498,264 pens 

13,494 rubber stamps 11,500 sponges 
18,537,620 envelopes 3,912,310 sheets carbon 
22,807, 100 second sheets 10, 104 pen holders 
70,000 thumb tacks 2,615,600 file backs 
421,000 blotters 3,924 message 

33,264 rubber erasers hooks 
2,487,000 McGill 10,620,730 rubber bands 

fasteners 900,720 clip fasteners 

As an example of the lack of care used 
in some offices in making up stationery 
requisitions, one division superintendent's 
office recently ordered over 2,000 lead 
pencils for a sixty days' supply, although 
other offices on the division made 
separate requisition for their own supply 
of pencils. Such requisitions as this 
make it necessary for all to be checked 



over, but it is only fair to say that some 
requisitions are so carefully made up 
that no changes are needed in the 
various amounts ordered. 

The following may be mentioned 
among the bad practices in the use of 
stationery: 

1. — Cutting up printed blanks, in 
current use, for scribbling paper, instead 
of ordering pads, which the Stationer 
makes up from obsolete forms returned. 

2. — Use of a large envelope where a 
small one will serve as well or better; 
also, not enclosing in one envelope as 
many communications to the same party 
as possible. 

3. — Throwing away sponges instead of 
washing and reusing them. 

4. — Discarding carbon paper which is 
still serviceable. 

5. — Throwing into the scrap basket 
with papers, rubber bands, pins and 
fasteners, which tend to reduce the value 
of the waste paper when sold, in addition 
to the loss of the bands, pins and fasten- 
ers. Some offices obtain their entire 
supply of pins and fasteners from dis- 
carded papers. 

6. — Allowing the stationery to become 
scattered about and soiled. 

A few suggestions which can, profitably, 
be followed, with resulting economy, in 
the use of stationery are: 

1. — Carefully check supplies on hand 
before making requisition. 

2. — Have requisitions made up by 
someone with sufficient experience and 
responsibility to insure the correct 
amounts being shown and in proper 
form order. 



27 



28 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



3. — Return, every six months at least, 
to the Stationer at Baltimore, all surplus 
or obsolete forms on hand. 

4. — Save all waste paper, and report 
accumulation to the Stationer, who will 
furnish shipping instructions. 

5. — Check over, frequently, the records, 
correspondence, old catalogues, etc., on 



hand and arrange for scrapping those 
which it is not necessary to keep longer. 

It is estimated that from forty to 
fifty thousand dollars a year can be 
saved by a general observance of these 
suggestions in regard to the ordering and 
use of stationery and small office sup- 
plies. 



Speaking of Patriotism 

By Irvin S. Cobb 

of The Vigilantes 



S""HPEAKING of patriotism and our 
duty to our country — and those 
||g|| are the things of which most of 
«= l us are speaking these days — why 
not buy a Liberty Bond or two? 

If ever a thing was well-named the 
Liberty Bond is. It stands for Liberty — 
for liberty not only for our own people 
but for all the peoples of the world — 
liberty from despotism, from imperial- 
ism, from militarism, and most of all, 
liberty from Prussianism, which summed 
up, is the other three isms rolled into one. 

And likewise, it is a Bond — a bond of 
faith, a bond of honor, a bond of reli- 
ability, a bond of security, backed up by 
the Government of the United States 
of America, its assets, its good name, its 
credits, its power and its possessions of 
whatsoever nature. 

In this war upon which we have en- 
tered, we are all of us going to be called 
upon to give something. War, if it 
means anything, means sacrifice. Some 
are going to make the supreme sacrifice. 
They are going to give their lives for 
their country. Souk; are going to give; 
their wealth and some of their time and 

all who count themselves true Americans 
are going to give of their loyalty and of 
their devotion and of their love for their 
land and of their steadfastness to its 
ideals. After some fashion or other this 
war, before it is done, will claim its 
tribute from every living man, woman 
and child among us and from (Mir chil- 



dren's children and their children. The 
right to national liberty is not a free 
gift. You have to earn it. By the 
sweat of their brows, by the blood of 
their veins, our forefathers earned it. 
This generation is just now engaging upon 
the tasks of preserving and perpetuating 
what those forefathers earned for us. If 
the heritage they handed down to us was 
worth taking it is worth keeping; if the 
flag they fought under is worth living 
under, it is worth defending. If the 
government they established is a govern- 
ment which should endure, if its secu- 
rities are staple and stable, it is our duty 
to invest in these securities, to prove 
the value of our own citizenship to our- 
selves by the confidence and the trust 
we show in our own institutions. The 
Liberty Bond issue gives us that chance 
without entailing the slightest risk upon 
our part. 

When we buy Liberty Bonds we are 
helping our country, helping as righteous 
a cause as ever sent a nation to battle, 
and at the same time we are safeguarding 
our savings and earning a decent rate of 
interest on our money. We can't lose; 
we are bound to win. Thieves may 
break in and moths may corrupt, but a 
Liberty Bond is as solid as Plymouth 
Rock and as honest as the Declaration 

of Independence. If it goes down our 
government goes down with it and then 
your money wouldn't do you any good 
anyway If you had kept it stored up 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



29 



it would be confiscated by a gentleman 
in a spiked helmet with spiked mus- 
taches and a spiked way of saying 
" Verboten" to practically everything you 
wanted to do. 

As long as the Stars and Stripes float 
the Liberty Bond will be aloft too. The 
Liberty Bond is guaranteed by every 
inch of our soil, by every shred of our 
traditions, its promise to pay is predi- 
cated on every ship that flies our flag, on 
every pennyweight of railroad iron in 
our land, on every peppercorn in our 
granaries, on every dollar of our circu- 
lation, on every rod of navigable river, 
on every furlong of highway, on every 
gill of water in every American harbor, 
on every pebble in the Rocky Moun- 
tains, on every blade of growing grain, 
on everything that we as a people own 
and ever have owned and ever shall own. 



And while we are on the subject I might 
add that it is predicated on something 
more besides. It is predicated on Bunker 
Hill, on Independence Hall, on the 
little apple tree at Appomattox, on 
the cornerstone of a building at Wash- 
ington, D. C, called the National Capitol. 
A man who wouldn't be satisfied with 
that collateral wouldn't risk a pewter 
dime for the hope of eternal salvation. 

Don't wait for somebody else to take 
your share of the best investment that 
is open to a patriot. Our great Revo- 
lutionary granddaddies weren't that sort. 
Their motto wasn't "Let George do it." 
They helped George do it! 

Don't sell Uncle Sam short. Don't 
be a bear on the Old Glory market. 
Don't make your own country ashamed 
of you. 

Buy a Liberty Bond. 




STANDARD TRACK AT HANCOCK, W. VA., ON THE CUMBERLAND DIVISION 



Help Win the War 



By Insisting Upon One Hundred Per Cent. 
Car Utilization 



OW is the time for all shippers and receivers of 



freight, in the spirit of patriotism, to see that 



every car is loaded to maximum capacity and to 
insist on prompt handling by the railroad. In fact, it is 
a military necessity that cars be utilized one hundred 
per cent. 

During the coming months, while the Nations' armies 
are fighting in the greatest conflict for freedom in the 
history of the world, the people must be fed, food must 
be distributed for home and foreign consumption, and 
the great bee-hives of industrial America will be crying 
for cars to load and move materials for manufacturing 
and to transport the finished supplies and ammunition 
for the warring armies. This condition already exists. 
The Nation's transportation machine is now being 
operated at close to the breaking point, and yet thousands 
of cars are being hauled with only a part load. Many 
of our patrons will cooperate if the matter is forcibly 
presented, and when solicitation fails other methods, 
authorized by the Government, will be employed. 

The average net carload on the Baltimore and Ohio 
for April was 29.3 tons; this was a slight increase over 
March, 1917, and April, 1916, but it is entirely too low. 

The average miles per car per day for April was 26.4, 
an increase of 8.0 per cent, over March, 1917, and a de- 
crease of 10.8 per cent, over April, 1916. 

Help your Country, help our Army and the armies of 
our Allies to win the war, and help yourself, by maximum 
Car Utilization. 




Hard Work the Order of the Day at Officers' 
Reserve Corps Training Camp" 

Writes the Editor of the Magazine from Fort Myer 



Dear Grahame: 

So much has appeared in the papers 
about the Officers' Reserve Corps Training 
Camps that it seems like " carrying coals 
to New Castle" for me to try to give the 
readers of the Magazine my observa- 
tions at Fort Myer. However, you may 
find in the following paragraphs some- 
thing of special interest as coming from 
one Baltimore and Ohio employe to the 
thousands of others in the big family. 

You remember that I reported under 
orders on the first day of the Training 
Course, May 14. It was a busy day, too, 
my activities ranging from the claiming 
of a cot in the Regular Army barracks 
to the taking of the first prophylaxis 
against typhoid and a "shot" of vaccine 
against small pox. But the efficiency of 
the arrangements made by our regular 
Army instructors for the induction of 
twenty-five hundred men into training 
life, was, in my mind, marvelous. To 
the eye of the newcomer there appeared 
to be scarcely a hitch in the program and 
the morning of the day following our 
arrival saw us wrestling with the regular 
schedule of reveille, mess, drill, etc. 

We were divided into fifteen companies, 
the divisions being made according to 
the alphabetical order of our names. 
This placed Herbert Stitt, our Magazine 
artist, in the Thirteenth Company and 
me in the barracks right next to his. 
You can imagine how busy we have been 
when, notwithstanding our friendship and 
close proximity, we have seen each other 
only three times during the three weeks 
that ended today. 

The schedule that we have been follow- 
ing recently is about as follows: 5.20 a. m., 
reveille; 5.30, first assembly (this forma- 



tion takes only about five minutes, but in 
the following twenty-five there is plenty 
to do in the way of washing, fixing up 
quarters, etc.); 6.00 breakfast; 6.30 to 
7.00 general policing or fatigue duty — in 
plain words a thorough cleaning of 
barracks and surrounding property — 7.00 
second assembly and from then until 11.45 
continuous drill, hiking, exercises, etc.; 
11.45 to 12.15 brief rest period for wash- 
ing, etc.; 12.15 dinner, followed by rest 
or odd job period until 1.30; from that 
time until 4.30 drill and lecture on the 
field; 4.30 cleaning rifle (a long, myste- 
rious and tedious operation for a rookie), 
shining shoes and generally getting in 
shape for the dress formation of the day, 
retreat, at 5.30; this latter is an impressive 
ceremony and includes the firing of the 
sunset gun, the lowering of the colors 
and the playing of the Star Spangled 
Banner. We have had it now each day 
for three weeks, but it never fails to thrill 
with its impressiveness. This is followed 
by a brief inspection of arms and equip- 
ment and at 6.00 o'clock we have supper 
back in the barracks. The study period 
from 7.00 until 9.00 is not an optional 
one, but under supervision. And from 
9.00 until 9.45 you can bet that our time 
is well occupied in writing letters and pre- 
paring for bed, for at taps, at 9.45, all 
lights are out, voices hushed and most 
of us sleeping a dreamless and well 
earned sleep. 

That schedule is a pretty hard one 
even for a railroad man, but in actual 
performance it has all the ear marks of 
the efficiency of our commanding officers. 
To illustrate — we are cautioned to lie 
down or take our ease in some way when- 
ever the command "rest" is given and to 



31 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



save ourselves to the greatest possible 
extent. 

The Baltimore and Ohio in Balti- 
more is well represented in the cam]). 
Elphinstone, former assistant night yard- 
master of Mount Clare, went over with 
me, and Campbell, former supervisor of 
passenger operation, is in No. 2 barracks, 
just opposite mine. Linthicum, of the 
paymaster's office, has, I understand, 
already won temporary spurs as captain 
of his company for a week; Leigh, son 
of our general superintendent of police, 
is right guide of his company this week, 
and Wight, former assistant division 
engineer of the Baltimore Division (who 
has been commissioned as captain) is 
taking the same rookie drill as the rest 
of us. Our employes will also be inter- 
ested to know that one of Mr. Willard's 
sons is working for his commission along 
with the other twenty-four hundred odd 
at Fort Myer. 

From what I have heard, the personnel 
of the men at Fort Myer stands favorable 
comparison with that of the other camps. 
For instance, in our company of two 
hundred and ten men, eighty per cent, 
had military training before they came 
here. We also have twelve ex-regulars, 
most of whom have been top-sergeants 
during their service. Of the six men in 
my little corner of the barracks one 
served his enlistment in the regular Army 



and in addition saw five years' service in 
the quartermaster's department of the 
Navy. Two were with the Yale Battery 
at Tobyhanna, Penn., last year, another, 
a Princeton man, was with Battery "A," 
of Baltimore, at the same place, and the 
last, a Lehigh graduate, has had con- 
siderable National Guard experience. 
Naturally, I feel very much a "rookie." 

This letter is getting so long that I 
cannot tell you one-tenth of what I 
would like to. Let me say in conclusion, 
however, that the opinion is often em- 
phatically expressed by our regular Army 
instructors that the efficiency of the new 
National Army will depend very largely 
on the measure of the success of us 
hopeful officers. From peace-loving, 
peace-thinking, peace-wanting United 
States to a quick, large and effective 
participation in the great struggle abroad 
seems a big step. Many of us (not 
nearly as many, however, as would like 
to) will have to help bridge this step. 
Hard work, seriousness, firm conviction 
that our National policy is right and quiet 
determination to do our bit, are the 
orders of the day each day at Fort Myer. 
More later. 

Sincerely, 

Robert M. Van Sant, 

Rookie No. 1469. 
(Erstwhile — Editor Employes 
Magazine.) 



i 



Safety a Necessity 

MOBILIZATION of all our resources is the first great problem confronting 
our country. It must be solved by the arteries of transportation. 
Upon railroad employes rests the immense responsibility of seeing that these 
national arteries suffer no injury by obstruction, interruption or decreased power. 
^ "The whole nation must be a team in which each man shall play the part for 
which he is best fitted," said our President in a recent proclamation. It is of 
vital importance that the time of the employe be not lost through injury result- 
ing from careless or unsafe practices — his services are required to help solve 
the nation's problem. 

The specialist at the machine is as important as the specialist at the front. 

" Safety First 99 for the Nation's Sake 



! 2 
it 



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Efficient Station Service the Keynote 
to Claim Prevention 

Minn nun nt)i nnm turn ciiiiiniiiiiiuiniiinniir. iiDiiiiiiiiiiniiiiimniiiitiiin uiniMiiimiroiiiimniiic: niiiiini niiitr inoini n iitinnii mi t: iiinci muni n ni nniiiiiitiiii iiiiniiiimuint 

It has been well said "that if we take care of the freight, the claims will 
take care of themselves." 

See that all shipments signed for are received in their entirety, in good 
order and marked in accordance with shipping ticket. 

Handle shipments as though they were your own. Damages due to rough 
handling, by being gouged or torn with stevedore hooks, dropped from trucks, 
thrown from top of some other shipment, struck by blade of truck, and those 
caused by goods being shipped in defective cars, such as those with leaky 
roofs, nails in sides or floor, defective doors, holes in floor, etc., are costly. 

Ninety per cent, of the shipments loaded out correctly reach destination 
promptly. Exercise care to see that shipments are loaded out of your station 
in proper car (initial and number of car to be placed on shipping ticket), 
contents of car properly stowed (heavy shipments on bottom) and contents 
of car broke down before being sealed. Way cars should be loaded in station 
order to assist the conductor in making full and prompt delivery and also 
to assist him in making time over the road. 

Assign a reliable employe to look after seal record of in and outbound 
cars. Complete and reliable seal records are important in intelligently handling 
claims, and should receive preferred attention. 

Caution your unloading clerk to use care in checking out shipments and 
insist upon the necessary notations, such as marks on shipment, damage, 
robbed, etc., being made. See that exceptions noted are promptly reported 
on prescribed form to those interested. 

Furnish each of your platform men with an identification button, so that 
they can promptly determine when an unauthorized person is on the platform 
and order him off, possibly preventing loss of part or entire package. 

See that you get a receipt for all freight delivered. If at any time there 
is a question in your mind as to ownership, or authorized drayman, consult 
your superior for instructions. Do not take a chance. 

All shipments received in bad order should be recoopered promptly, to 
prevent further loss and damage. 

Hold meetings of your force and discuss the various irregularities that 
come up from time to time and arrange to avoid them in the future. Rules 
or words will not prevent claims. Care and attention will prevent errors and 
omissions and the claims will take care of themselves. The number of com- 
plaints and claims against your station is a good guide to the number of 
errors and omissions for which you are responsible. Avoid them. 

Yours for prevention, 

C. C. GLESSNER, 

Auditor Freight Claims. 



The Part of Fuel Economy in National Defense 

Some of the Many Things that Should be Done 
to Effect Immediate Fuel Economy 

To All Locomotive Engineers and Firemen: 

All consumers of coal, railroads, industrials, public utilities and individuals, are 
confronted with an extraordinary measure of difficulty in their attempt to secure an 
adequate supply of fuel. 

The President, in his special message to Congress, appealed to the miner, to the men 
who run the railroads of the country, to the managers of industries and to direct con- 
sumers, to conserve the resources of the country to the fullest possible extent. 

Both the Council of National Defense and the American Railway Association's 
Special Committee on National Defense have issued appeals to all of the railroads of 
the country to conserve motive power, to avoid waste of fuel, to increase car efficiency 
and to obtain maximum train loading. 

Realizing the gravity of the situation as regards fuel supply, and further realizing the 
possibility of eliminating waste in the use of fuel, the following suggestions are given: 

To Locomotive Engineers: 

1. If your fireman does not employ the best practice, instruct him yourself and 
ask the road foreman or supervisor of locomotive operation to have a friendly talk with 
him, setting him right. 

2. Advise the fireman as to grades, shut-off points, the length of time it is probable 
train will be held in side-tracks, etc., and explain to him your manner of handling the 
injector, so that he can fire accordingly. 

3. Endeavor to work your engine at the shortest practical cut-off at all times, so 
as to obtain the full expansive force of the steam used. 

4. Endeavor to feed the boiler uniformly, and do not allow the water level to rise 
so high that the effectiveness of the engine or the superheater will be destroyed. 

5. Study the condition of your locomotive on each run, endeavoring to definitely 
determine all defects that result in waste of steam or coal, reporting in writing on work 
report on arrival at shop or enginehouse. 

To Locomotive Firemen: 

1. Break all large lumps of coal, so that no coal will be wasted by firing such lumps. 

2. Keep the deck clean. 

3. Do not permit coal to waste off the gangway. 

4. Close the fire door after each scoopful of coal is fired. 

5. Do not slug the fire. 

6. Three or four scoops to a fire, even with the largest engines, give the most 
economical results. 

7. Do not shake the grates except when absolutely necessary, and then only slightly. 

8. Do not rake the fire except to fill a hole or break up a bank. When engine is 
drifting, fire only sufficient amount to maintain fire in proper condition. 

9. Study the problem of proper firing. Read booklet "Good Firing," Form 2403 
Rev., just issued, which may be obtained free upon application to your Road Foreman 
of Engines. Talk about it with other firemen. 

10. Inform your engineer as to any defects that may exist in connection with the 
grates, shaker arrangements, firing tools or stoker apparatus, in order to make sure 
that proper report of same will be made. 

11. Get all the pointers you can from your engineer, and practice the principles of 
proper firing as your share in helping to solve the fuel problem. 



The above suggestions, if carried out in a thorough and conscientious manner, will 
result in effecting such saving and conservation of the fuel supply as will reflect to the 
credit of each individual contributing thereto, and will represent in the fullest sense an 
adequate and patriotic answer to the call of the President and the Council of National 
Defense, as well as assist in reducing the rising cost of transportation, of which fuel 
is, with the exception of wages, the largest single item. 



Two Representative Chicago Terminal 

Employes 



Track Foreman E. J. O'Connor and 
Carpenter Foreman Samuel R. Ball 

By Roy G. Clark 

Assistant Abstracter, Chicago Terminal 



SJ. O'CONNOR entered the 
service of the Chicago Terminal 
on June 11, 1905, as track 
foreman at Hammond. Five 
years later he was placed in charge of the 
work at East Chicago yard and at various 
times has been extra gang foreman in 
that territory. He is at present track 
foreman in the East Chicago district, 
embracing East Chicago yard, the largest 
on the Chicago Terminal, and in a very 
complicated industrial territory. 

Mr. O'Connor has had charge of 
re-laying all the rail on the entire line 



between Dolton and Pine Junction and 
also on the Whiting line, as well as the 
supervision of all railroad crossings in 
that district. To one familiar with the 
situation in and about Hammond and 
East Chicago the magnitude of this work 
is at once apparent. In addition to this 
a complex net-work of switching leads, 
joint industrial tracks and private indus- 
trial sidings makes Mr. O'Connor's terri- 
tory entirely different from that of the 
average track foreman. With many 
joint ownerships involved, he must not 
only be a good track man, but must have 




36 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



a comprehensive knowledge of the track- 
age and ownership rights of the various 
railroads involved in that district. 

Mr. O'Connor is a representative 
track foreman because he successfully 
fulfills these three essentials: first, he is 
a good track man and practices " Safety 
First;" second, he realizes the value of 
clear and concise reports and the neces- 
sity of sending them in promptly; third, 
he is always genial and courteous, a 
valuable asset to any railroad serving a 
large number of industries who require 
considerable track work done for them. 



Carpenter Foreman Samuel R. 
Ball 

picture in the Magazine!" 
Mr. Ball exclaimed, when asked 
for a photograph. "Why do 
you want my picture? I've never 
done anything wonderful; just tried to do 
my duty and give the best that was in 
me." And that was why we particularly 
wanted Mr. Ball's picture; because he 
gave the best that was in him. 

Samuel R. Ball, like all good novelists, 
poets and carpenters, was born in 
Indiana, the favored city being South 
Bend and the date May 30, 1850. When 
three years old he moved to Walkerton, 
anticipating the Baltimore and Ohio at 
that point by about twenty years. He 
held positions with different companies 
there, being at various times a telegraph 
operator, a carpenter shop foreman and a 
contractor's helper. On June 17, 1891, he 
entered the service of the Baltimore and 
Ohio as a carpenter at Walkerton; on 
June 4, 1904 he was made carpenter 
foreman, the position which he held 
until 1911, when he was transferred to 




CARPENTER FOREMAN SAMUEL R. BALL 



the Chicago Terminal as carpenter fore- 
man, his present position. 

Mr. Ball is a true railroad man. 
Twenty-six years of continuous service 
have made the Baltimore and Ohio a 
vital part of his life; you can't talk to 
him for five minutes without his men- 
tioning some phase of his work. He 
believes that being a carpenter foreman 
does not mean merely the repairing of 
crossing plank, fences, buildings and the 
like; but that it also means the keeping 
of such records and the making of such 
reports that the work he does can always 
be identified, a very important point, as 
every accountant will testify. With this 
end in view Mr. Ball has for many years 
kept a complete diary of his daily work 
and has preserved copies of all of his 
reports for the same period. This work 
has all been done outside of his working 
hours and represents a small part of 
what he modestly calls "giving the best 
that was in me." 



I The President's Message to Railroad Men 

,r ~T0 THE MEN who run the railways of the country, whether they be managers 
A or operative employes, let me say that the railways are the arteries of a nation's 
life, and that upon them rests the immense responsibility of seeing to it that those 
arteries suffer no obstruction of any kind, no inefficiency or slackened power." 





Promotions, Changes and Other Items of 
Interest Picked Up Along the 
Line of Road 



New Steamship Line Between 
Baltimore and South American 
Ports Starts Service 



Ell 



NEW steamship line between 
Baltimore and South American 
ports has been established by the 
Baltimore-South American Navi- 
gation Company, service beginning with 
the sailing of the steamship "Senta" from 
our Locust Point Terminals on May 30. 
The cargo was assembled by our road 
through its traffic organization, from 
points reached by our lines and by con- 
necting railroads. 

The permanence of the new steamship 
line is indicated by the fact that later 
sailings are being booked. The second 
sailing will be the "Kirishimazon Maru," 
which will sail from Baltimore for Buenos 
Ayres on June 20. 

Business interests regard the new 
steamship line as one of the most stimu- 
lating influences which Baltimore has 
experienced since the beginning of the 
extensive industrial development two 
years ago, when plans covering an ex- 
penditure of more than $50,000,000 were 
decided upon. The inauguration of the 
regular South American service stands 
out, in fact, alongside of the projecting 
of the first railroad in 1827 and the first 



trans-Atlantic steamship from Baltimore, 
in 1858. It will mark a new era in Balti- 
more shipping by bringing the important 
trade centers of the east into direct trans- 
portation connection with the principal 
ports of South America. 

Announcement to Baltimore business 
interests of the new steamship line was 
first made by vice-president Thompson, 
on the occasion of an inspection of the 
Railroad's terminals by the members of 
the City Club last winter. 



Changes in Transportation 
Department 



FFECTIVE June 1 W. G. Curren, 
formerly assistant general super- 
intendent of transportation at 
Cincinnati, became superinten- 
dent of transportation at Baltimore, and 
E. W. Hoffman, assistant superintendent 
of the Toledo Division, was promoted to 
assistant superintendent of transporta- 
tion at Cincinnati. 

Mr. Curren's appointment fills a posi- 
tion left vacant a few years ago, when 
J. R. Kearney was advanced from 
superintendent to general superintendent 
of transportation, to succeed C. C. Riley, 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



deceased. The title of assistant general 
superintendent of transportation at Cin- 
cinnati will be abolished with the 
promotion of Mr. Hoffman to assist- 
ant superintendent of transportation 
there. 

Mr. Curren is a native of Webbs Mills, 
N. Y., and was born on April 12, 1881. 
After filling various positions with the 
Pennsylvania, Erie and the Kansas City 
Southern railroads, he entered the service 
of the Baltimore and Ohio in March, 

1912, as assistant superintendent in the 
Transportation Department, two years 
later becoming assistant to the general 
superintendent of transportation. Later 
he was made assistant general superin- 
tendent of the same department, with 
headquarters at Baltimore. 

Mr. Hoffman was born on October 9, 
1877, and entered the service of the Cin- 
cinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Railway 
as general yardmaster at Indianapolis, 
on February 20, 1908. He was next 
made trainmaster and became supervisor 
of transportation of the Baltimore and 
Ohio at Baltimore, on February 10, 

1913. He was advanced to assistant 
superintendent of the Toledo Division in 
December, 1914. 



Baltimore and Ohio Represented 
at Rotary Club of Newark, 
Ohio, Exhibition 

HE Rotary Club of Newark held 
a Merchants' and Manufactur- 
ers' Exhibition during the week 
of May 28. Each member took 
it upon himself to dispose of one booth, 
and superintendent Stevens donated his 
to our passenger department. 

General passenger agent Squiggins 
sent D. G. Bates, of Chicago, and J. C. 
Kelly, of Cincinnati, advertising agents, 
and city ticket clerk J. C. Strickenburg, 
of Chicago, to take charge of the booth. 
W. C. Wilson, our ticket agent at Newark, 
also aided in the work. Messrs. Bates 
and Kelly are the gentlemen in the ac- 
companying picture. The Baltimore and 
Ohio received some splendid advertising 
through this exhibit. 

W. E. Hampton Leaves the Service 

HFTER nine years of service W. E. 
Hampton, of the Commercial 
Development Department and 
secretary-treasurer of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Trapshooting Club, has 
severed his connection with our Company 





OUH EXHIBIT AT THE MERCHANTS AND IfANUFACTl RER8' EXHIBITION OF THE 
ROTARY CLUB OF NEWARK, OHIO 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



to take a position with the American 
Refractories Company, which, largely 
through the efforts of our Commercial 
Development Department, has established 
a plant on our tracks in the Curtis Bay 
District. 

The best wishes of Mr. Hampton's 
business and shooting friends go with him 
to his new work. May his efforts always 
be rewarded by a perfect score! 



O. L. Eaton Appointed Transpor- 
tation Expert at Officers' Reserve 
Corps Training Camp 

T~'""TO become transportation expert 
I at the Officers' Reserve Corps 
Training Camp, Fort Myer, Vir- 
ginia (representing the Baltimore 
and Ohio), O. L. Eaton, superintendent 
of the Connellsville Division, has been 
relieved of his duties. The appointment 
is effective at once. 

Mr. Eaton has had broad training in 
railroad operation, which ably fits him 
for his duties as an instructor of the 
officer students, at the same time en- 
abling them to secure a working knowl- 
edge of dispatching trains, keeping traffic 
moving and other phases of railroad 
work vital to the efficient handling of the 
country's transportation in time of war. 

M. H. Broughton, formerly superin- 
tendent of the Illinois Division will 
succeed Mr. Eaton at Connellsville. 

Ross Mann, superintendent of the 
Wellston Division, is appointed superin- 
tendent of the Illinois Division. 

E. J. Carrell, who has been district 
engineer maintenance of way of the South- 
west District, becomes superintendent of 
the Wellston Division. 



New Medical Car Placed in 
Service 



MEDICAL car fitted with 
special features necessary for 
the examination of employes in 
train service has just been com- 
pleted. It will be used by the chief 
medical examiner and his staff, and is 
designed as a traveling office for the 



Medical Department. It will be used 
for the examination of new employes 
entering the service in any branch re- 
quiring perfect vision and hearing, and 
for the periodical examination of em- 
ployes already in the service. The car 
is equipped with special appliances for 
testing the color sense of men who have 
to observe color signals, and may be 
darkened in order to test them as to 
their accuracy in observing signals at 
night. Special provision has been made 
for examining telegraph operators and 
agents as to their hearing. The car will 
be both the office and living quarters of 
members of the medical staff while they 
are traveling on business. A blue cross 
has been painted on its sides to dis- 
tinguish it from our regular equipment. 



Arthur C. Spurr Promoted 



523 



|RTHUR C. Spurr has been ap- 
pointed chief of the Facilities 
Bureau of the Commercial De- 
velopment Department, to suc- 
ceed A. C. Clarke, who was recently pro- 
moted to assistant engineer of surveys. 
Mr. Spurr was formerly connected with 
the Operating Department, in various 
capacities. He was transferred from 
Youngstown, Ohio, where he has been 
assistant yardmaster. 

He is a native of Valley City, North 
Dakota, and was born on August 27, 
1889. He was graduated from Yale 
University, later studied law and was ad- 
mitted to the bar in Connecticut. He 
entered the service of the Baltimore and 
Ohio on October 1, 1913, as a student em- 
ploye of the Operating Department. 

Baltimore and Ohio Debating Club 
Had Successful Season 



ON May 8 the Rev. Harry C. 
Armstrong, of Baltimore, deliv- 
ered an address to the Debating 
Club on " Gesture, Its Proper 
Place in Public Speech." Mr. Armstrong 
is a speaker of marked power and his 
address was a revelation to those who 
had previously failed to appreciate what 
lay behind this subject. At the con- 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



elusion of the address the members of 
the Club and the others present turned 
themselves into human interrogation 
points and fired questions at the worthy 
minister, who showed himself a master 
of his subject and came back with 
illuminating answers. Mr. Armstrong 
also spoke of the essentials needed by a 
public speaker and laid special weight 
on vocal expression, change of pitch, 
inflection, touch, color and movement. 
His real text was " Natural Action as an 
Outlet for Thought." 

The concluding session of the Club 
for the season, on May 15, was devoted 
to a spirited debate on the subject: 

"Resolved: That the raising of an army 
by draft is preferable to depending upon 
volunteer service." 

The draft side had slightly the better 
of the argument and won the decision of 
the chairman on a tie vote. Those partici- 
pating were: Draft — Messrs. Trageser, 
Horlebein and Wuster. Volunteer Sys- 
tem — Messrs. Phillips, Reilly and Gardner. 

The club aims to re-open in the fall 
with deeper interest. All of those who 
finished the course were loath to close, 
but it was realized that hot weather 
would interfere with the work. 

Dr. Parlett, chief of the Welfare Bureau, 
has written to H. Irving Martin, of the 
auditor freight claims' office, thanking 
him for his efforts and congratulating him 
upon his success in making the weekly 
meeting of the Debating Club interesting 
and profitable to the members. Mr. 



Martin has been the leading spirit in the 
Club since its inception and the members 
are deeply grateful to him for the series 
of talks on " Business Elocution" that he 
has delivered. Every member will agree 
with Dr. Parlett when he says, " You are 
doing a most commendable and self- 
sacrificing work and one that will live 
long in the minds of those to whom you 
have devoted your time and talents." 

Flag Raising at Locust Point on 
Memorial Day 

M-^IEMORIAL DAY at the Locust 
Point yards was observed by a 
flag raising ceremony. It was 
the nineteenth anniversary of the 
flag raising held by our Locust Point 
employes in the days of the Spanish 
American War. 

The flag was purchased with the con- 
tributions of the yard employes and raised 
upon a one-hundred foot staff presented 
by the McLean and Kerbaugh Con- 
tracting Companies. 

The speakers were the Rev. J. Wynne 
Jones, W. A. McCleary, Walter A. Cox 
and Hon. William F. Broening. Miss 
Sylvia Buckman sang "If I Had a Son for 
Each Star in Old Glory" and "America, 
Here is My Boy," and Mr. Thomas F. 
McNulty, Sheriff of Baltimore City, sang 
"The Star Spangled Banner." T. E. 
Stacy, of the Riverside Y. M. C. A., 
was on hand with his cornet to lead the 





A LARGE AND ENTHUSIASTIC CROWD ATTENDED THE MEMORIAL DAY FLAG 
RAISING AT LOCUST POINT 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



41 




LITTLE MISS DORIS HARNE, THE LEADING 
LADY OF THE FLAG RAISING 
CEREMONIES 

singing of ''My Country 'Tis of Thee/' 
with which the ceremony began, and the 
hymn, "God Be With You 'Til We Meet 
Again," with which it closed. The Rev. 
Jones pronounced the benediction. 

Miss Doris Harne, who had the honor 
of releasing the banner to the breeze, 
while the Fourth Regiment men present 
fired a salute to Old Glory, is a niece of 
yardmaster McCleary. 



Passenger Service Curtailed as a 
War Measure 



E3 

Ell 



CTING on the recommendations 
of the War Board, the Baltimore 
and Ohio is preparing to curtail 
its passenger service so far as is 
possible, and with the least inconvenience 
to the public, in order to keep its main 



lines in the industrial districts and coal 
regions unencumbered for the move- 
ment of foodstuffs, supplies and materials 
of all kinds required by the Govern- 
ment as well as the public, and in order 
that there may be sufficient equip- 
ment to handle this traffic in any 
emergency. The curtailment of passen- 
ger service will release a large number of 
cars and locomotives that can be utilized 
in the interest of national defense. 

The recommendations made by the 
War Board will place a large burden upon 
the railroads as they will result in the 
removal in some instances of passenger 
trains which, while they must of necessity 
come off, have been a source of large 
earnings to the companies. This sacri- 
fice must be made for the cause of the 
nation. 

P. H. Lantz Appointed Commercial 
Agent at Philadelphia and Suc- 
ceeded by L. C. Sauerhammer 

IFFECTIVE June 11 P. H. Lantz, 
chief clerk to J. M. Davis, vice- 
president operation and mainte- 
nance, was appointed commercial 
freight agent at Philadelphia, with offices 
in the Widener Building. 

To fill the position made vacant by Mr. 
Lantz's promotion, L. C. Sauerhammer 
has been promoted. Mr. Sauerhammer 
entered the service on December 9, 1899, 
as supervisor's clerk at Piedmont, West 
Virginia, and for eleven years served in 
various clerical capacities in the Mainte- 
nance of Way Department. In September, 
1911, he entered the Operating Depart- 
ment as chief clerk to the superintendent 
of the Baltimore Division, and on July 
1, 1913, was placed in charge of the 
Bureau of Federal and State Commission 
Reports. In February, 1916, he was 
made chief clerk to the general manager, 
at New York, the position he filled until 
his recent promotion. 



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Are You Doing Your Bit? 



42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 





Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine 



* Robert M. Van Sant, Editor 
Arthur W. Grahame, Associate Editor 

♦Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 
George B. Luckey, Staff Photographer 

*0n furlough attending Officers' Reserve Corps Training Camp 



Registration Day 

IUNE 5, 1917, will be looked back 
upon as one of the great land- 
marks in American history, as a 
' day comparable with that April 
day in 1775 when the Minute Men of 
Massachusetts fired the shot that changed 
the course of our history and the equally 
memorable July day in 1863, when 
Pickett's gallant charge broke down at 
Gettysburg and the Union was saved — as 
the day upon which occurred the regis- 
t ration for National service of all men 
between the ages of twenty-one and 
thirty-one. 

It was not because men were drafted 
for the army that the event was an 
important one — men were drafted after 
the volunteer system broke down during 
the Civil War. It was momentous 
because at last the nation had formally 
recognized the principal that the citizen 
who accepts the benefits of a democratic 
government also accepts liability for ser- 
vice to that government, whenever and 
in whatever capacity the Government may 
decide. 



Many people look upon selective 
conscription merely as a means of getting 
men for the army. It is much more 
than that. It is the selection of men for 
service, not only for military service, 
but for industrial and agricultural service 
as well. Under the volunteer system 
many of the men who enlist would be 
more valuable in their usual occupations 
than on the firing line. The man who 
is a conspicuous success in civil life may 
prove to be an equally conspicuous 
failure as a soldier. This is no reflection 
on the man's character — many a good 
soldier would make a poor lawyer or 
carpenter. Selective conscription takes 
the man best fitted for military service 
and sends him to the front. It sends the 
man best fitted for industry back to 
industry. The man so returned to his 
usual occupation is quite as much a 
soldier of America as is the man who 
dons the uniform. His responsibility 
and his liability for service is the same. 
He is merely serving in a different 
branch of the industrial and military 
army of the Republic. 

Registration Day was important in 
another way. It marked a victory for 
the men who for the last three years 
have been fighting hard for Universal 
Military Training and Service. Selec- 
tive conscription and universal training 
are not the same thing, but the step in 
advance is a long one. If a Universal 
Service law had been passed three years 
ago we would today have a larger army of 
trained men than that composed of 500,000 
raw recruits which will be called to the 
colors in September. We would have 
trained officers for the army, instead of 
having to rely upon the hastily organized 
training camps which, at the cost of great 
sacrifice by many of the patriotic men 
who volunteered for them, are expected 
to turn out the company officers for the 
first National army. 

But this is no time for talking about 



□=n=n=n=n=n=n=Q=n=n=a= 

□ DON'T BE A SLACKER I 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



43 



what might have been. America's job 
is to raise an arnry as quickly as she can, 
train them and get them into the trenches 
at the earliest possible moment. It is 
also her job to equip and supply that 
army, to help our Allies in every way 
possible and to conserve our resources 
for what may be a long war. With a 
contract of this size on hand every 
American, whether or not he is selected 
for military service, can surely find 
something useful to do. 

We will win the war. There can be no 
doubt about that. And when the war 
is over we shall hear that it was the last 
war — that there will never be another. 
But if we are wise we will take heed from 
the lessons of the past and prepare our- 
selves. Universal Military Training and 
Service spells real preparedness against 
future war. 



The Liberty Bond is Gilt-Edged 

By Roger Babson 

§^y1 AM subscribing to the Liberty 
1 Loan as a good investment, 
irrespective of any patriotism. 
' ' '* If more people would take these 
bonds as a pure investment, they would 
be very much better off than in using 
the money for other things which they 
would probably buy. These Liberty 
Loan Bonds are as secure, and should be 
as liquid as any savings bank account, 
while they yield V/2 per cent, more than a 
regular checking account. I don't know 
of any place a person could put his money 
with such safety, get such a high rate of 
interest, and be able at any time to get 
his money out again, as through these 
Liberty Loan Bonds. 

I think that a great many people forget 
the convertible feature. This possibility 
of being able to convert the bonds into 
4 per cent, or 4J/2 per cent, bonds, or per- 



haps 5 per cent, bonds makes them ex- 
ceedingly attractive. I really think that 
so much has been said about subscribing 
to these loans as a "duty" that people 
have almost forgotten them as an invest- 
ment and have looked on the purchase of 
them more as they would a contribution 
to the Red Cross or the Belgian fund. 
I am interested in the Liberty Loan Bond 
issue as an attractive investment, especially 
for people of limited means who otherwise 
are very liable to get " stung" and lose 
half their savings through "Get Rich 
Quick" schemes. 



The Sporting Spirit 

T"~1HE German raises his clenched 
fists to heaven and calls upon 
God to punish England. He 
sings his hymn of hate to the 
accompaniment of the roar of his great 
guns. 

Tommy Atkins, in his trench on the 
other side of "No Man's Land," crawls 
into his bomb proof and lights a cig- 
arette. "Just a little morning hate," 
he remarks: "I'll get that blighter later." 
And he usually does. 

That is the difference between the war 
spirit of England and of Germany. Which 
shall we choose? 

The English, of course. Like the 
British we are a nation of sportsmen. 
We will fight hard and inflict as much 
damage upon the enemy as is by fair 
means possible. We will 'see red' while 
we are fighting — but we will fight fair 
as we have played fair. We will make 
Kaiser Bill feel the weight of Uncle 
Sam's big fist and banish the Hun to 
his proper place in the animal kingdom 
— but we won't waste our time and 
energy in singing hymns of hate. A 
stirring Sousa march will take us further 
on the road to Berlin. 




=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□ 
HELP WIN THE WAR jjj 
=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□=□ 



Home Dressmaker's Corner 



Sun Bonnets are all the Rage Since the Women of the 
Country Have Gone in for Gardening 



if 



T" " 1HE government has advised every 
citizen who has a plot of ground 
gagS to go in for intensive farming, 
===3 no matter on how small a scale. 
The country will be affected by a serious 
food shortage if every opportunity pos- 
sible is not used to till the soil. Of 
course, gardening without a sun bonnet 
is no pleasure at all, hence the demand 
by women , who are doing their own 
sewing to economize for the soldiers, 
for models that are practical, not for- 
getting the attractive feature. Two 
designs which will be well-liked are 
shown here. One yard of 27-inch ma- 
terial will be sufficient for either bonnet 
and design A may be made with a 
straight or scalloped edge, while B is 
designed to be finished with scallops. 

To cut bonnet A fold the material as 
shown in the cutting guide and place 
the front on the lengthwise fold of 
material, with the underfacing to the 
left of it. The string has the straight 



CUTTING GUIDE 5029 




BONNET A 




FOLD OF 2.7- INCH MATERIAL 



edge running parallel with the selvage 
of the goods and the large "0" per- 
forations rest on a lengthwise thread. 
The back rests on a lengthwise fold. 
The front and back of bonnet B are 
placed on the 
lengthwise fold 
of material, 
with the facing 
to the left of 
the front and 
the stay to the 
right of the 
back. The 
string has the 
large "O" per- 
forations rest- 
ing on a lengt h - 



BONNET B 




LD OF £7- INCH MATERIAL 



44 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



wise thread, the straight edge being placed 
on the selvage. 

If bonnet A is to be made, first stitch 
a casing underneath the back along 
crosslines of small "o" perforations 
and insert elastic. Bring corresponding 
large "O" perforations in front and back 
together and tack. Plait upper end of 
string bringing "T" perforations to 
small u o" perforations and fasten under- 
neath bonnet at large "O" perforation 
in front section. 

To make bonnet B, first gather the 
front and lower edges of back section 
between double "XT" perforations. 
Sew front to back, notches and centers 
even. Adjust stay to position under- 
neath gathers at lower edge of back. 
Plait upper end of string bringing "T" 
perforations to small "o" perforations 
and tack to position underneath front 
section at large "O" perforation. 

The bonnet may correspond with the 
garden or bungalow apron. Gingham, 
chambray, cretonne and similar materi- 
als are used for garden aprons and while 
the most popular designs are simple in 
effect they are always picturesque. 

Sun Bonnets No. 5029. Sizes, small, 
medium and large. Price, 15 cents. 




SKETCH No. 1 




SKETCH No. 2 



"Color" is the Keynote in Dresses 
Sketch No. 1 

There never was a season when color 
played such a prominent part on the 
stage of dress as it will play during the 
coming summer. " Brown-eyed" beau- 
ties will revel in gold shade, peacock blue 
and deep blue greens that set off their 
complexions, rose and fuchsia shades. 
"Miss Blue-eyes" will lose her heart to 
the new Dutch and soldier blues, lighter 
greens, magenta and Burgundy. The 
frock of gold silk crepe de chine pictured 
to the left is smart, straight and simple. 
The skirt is shirred to the long-waisted 
bodice and what trimming there is is 
expressed in embroidery done in chiffon 
cloth. In medium size the design re- 
quires 5 yards 44-inch silk crepe de chine 
with z /i yard of all-over embroidery. 

Dutch blue foulard in bordered effect 
makes up the second model with the 
slip-over blouse. The skirt is plaited 
on either side of the front panel and the 
blouse is held in with a narrow belt of 
self -material. Six yards of 40-inch bor- 
dered silk make the costume. 

First Model: Pictorial Review Costume 
No. 7158. Sizes, 14 to "20 years. Price, 20 
cents. 

Second Model: Costume No. 7136. Sizes, 
16 to 20 years. Price 20 cents. 



46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




SKETCH No. 3 



Frocks of Engag- 
ing Originality 

Sketch No. 2 

If you would have 
your summer tailleur 
faultless in its chic, 
look well to the plait- 
ed peplum, contrast- 
ing stitchings, straight 
skirt, bone buttons 
and wide collar, for 
these are the tilings 
that count for perfec- 
tion. The effective 
costume pictured first 
is in blue silk poplin 
trimmed with chenille 
stitched satin. A deep 
band of the satin 
trims the lower edge 
of the skirt and the 
sleeves, belt and collar 
facing are of the same 
decoration. In me- 
dium size the suit requires 5 yards 48-inch 
poplin and 2 yards of fancy satin. 

The second model perfectly character- 
izes the simple modes. It is developed 
in Chartreuse men's wear serge, the 
jacket being fitted into the waistline 
and having a deep peplum. The stitch- 
ing which trims the jacket is done in 
coarse black silk threads. Medium size 
requires 5J4 yards 54-inch material. 

First Model: Pictorial Review Jacket No. 
6666. Sizes, 34 to 44 inches bust. Price, 20 
'•cuts. Skirt No. 7086. Sizes, 24 to 36 inches 
waist. Price, 20 cents. 

Second Model: Jacket No. 7018. Sizes, 
34 to 44 inches bust. Price, 20 cents. Skirt 
No. 6844. Sizes, 22 to 34 inches waist. Price, 
15 cents. 

Gay in Color; Smart of Cut 

Sketch No. 3 

The tailored suit divides itself frankly 
into two types this season, one for sports 
and one for dress. Great prominence is 
given to the sports costume because of 
its unusual coloring and excellence of 
fill. Plain and figured sports silk are 
combined in this design, the plain skirt 
accompanying a Mouse that is plaited 
al cither side to give the front a panel 
effect. Collar and belt correspond with 



the skirt. Medium size requires 4}/? 
yards 30-inch figured and 3% yards 
36-inch plain silk. 

Pictorial Review Blouse No. 7172. Sizes, 
34 to 44 inches bust. Price, 20 cents. Skirt 
No. 7128. Sizes, 24 to 36 inches waist. Price, 
20 cents. 

Superlative Simplicity 

Sketch No. 4 

Frocks of superlative simplicity lead in 
interest because their development is so 
varied. It is not al- 
ways easy to achieve 
simplicity inexpen- 
sively, however. The 
model illustrated to- 
day is fashioned in 
rookie linen, trim- 
med with black and 
white striped linen. 
It is an unusual com- 
bination, and distinc- 
tive. The straight 
skirt is gathered to 
the straight waist 
with V-shaped neck, 
the buttons and pock- 
ets being of self-ma- 
terial. Six yards 36- 
inch plain and 1 yard 
36-inch striped linen 
are required to make 
the costume. 

Pictorial Review Dress 
No. 7154. Sizes, 14 to 20 
years. Price, 20 cents. SKETCH No. 4 



Women's Committee of the Council 
of National Defense Organizes 
Child Welfare Department 

|ISS Julia Lathrop, head of the 
Children's Bureau of the Depart- 
ment of Labor, has been asked to 
head the child welfare department 
of the women's commit tee of the Council 
of National Defense. 

Miss Lathrop has invest [gated the war- 
time condition of children in Europe and 
Canada and through her studies is in a 
position to furnish valuable information 
to mothers and others interested in child 
welfare in this country. 





The Needleworker's Corner 



Embroideries for Camisoles, Sashes 
and Aprons 

By Alice J. Kuehn 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



ES 

CS3 



ILTHOUGH fabrics of sheer tex- 
ture have become so universally 
popular as to be worn by many 
even during, the winter months, 
their absolute reign really begins with 
the advancing summer season. 

The diaphanous materials of which so 
many of the dainty blouses are fashioned, 
naturally demand underwear more 
elaborate of construction than it would 
need to be if it were invisible. A rather 
amusing feature often observed, is that 
the camisole is more lavishly embroidered 
or lace trimmed than the outer garment. 
It is an undeniable fact that simplicity 
has practically departed from these 
garments. Or if simple lines and trim- 
mings are employed hand-embroidery 
generally supplies the so highly valued 
touch of exclusiveness, which increases 
its value. 

Now we have arrived at the subject to 
be discussed, hand-embroidery. For- 
tunate is the woman who can ply the 
needle. She can indulge in the possession 
of all those dainty pieces of lingerie 



P*3 



No. 12291— MOTIFS FOR CAMISOLES, ETC. 



p. I 




No. 12351— FOR SASH DECORATIONS 

without taxing her purse to the limit. 
Silk or cotton crepe is most effectively 
adorned with embroidery made in French 
knots and lazy daisy stitch. A very 
pretty design for this purpose is shown 
here in the first illustration. The festoon 
with the ribbon bow-knots as well as the 
one with the small basket would be 
charming for the front of a camisole 
which slips on over the head. For a 
garment which closes in front, the scrolls 
and small sprays may be used. Light 
blue is used for the bow-knots, which are 
worked in outline stitch, and light green 
for the stems and leaves. The latter are 
embroidered in lazy daisy stitch. The 
little roses are made of French knots in 
2 or 3 shades of pink. The design may 
also be adapted to aprons or fancy 
articles, for which these graceful garlands 
provide just the right touch. 

It may be effectively adapted to a sash 
made of black satin ribbon about 9 inches 
wide. The motif 8 inches wide is used 
for each end of the sash. Above this 
motif, two rows of the border extended 
upward to about 16 inches. The em- 
broidery is developed in steel beads and 



47 



48 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




black Rope silk. On fabrics for which 
bead-embroidery does not seem suitable, 
French knots may take the place of the 
single beads and satin stitch worked 
either in silk or cotton floss may be used 
for the solid embroidery. 

The second design is of an entirely 
different character. As it contains sev- 
eral of each of the 3 motifs and 3 x /i yards 
of banding 4 inches wide, this pattern 
will be found useful for more than one 
purpose. 

No. 12291 — Design stamped on dotted swiss 
for an apron, with colored embroidery cotton, 
60 cents. 

No. 12291 — Transfer pattern, blue, 15 cents. 

No. 12351 — Transfer pattern, blue or yellow, 
20 cents. Pattern contains 7 each of 3 styles 
of motifs, 5, 6 and 8 inches wide, and 2>\ yards 
of 4 inch wide border. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale by local 
agents. 



Your first patriotic 
Liberty Bond! 



duty — Buy a 



What the American Woman Can 
Do to Help Win the War 

HAT can I do to help win the 
war?" wonders the American 
womarL 

■ — — ' There are several things that she 
can do. 

If she happens to live in a city where 
there is such an organization, she may 
join one of the Women's Defense Lea- 
gues, don khaki and learn rifle shooting 
and military drill. This is romantic and 
picturesque, but not particularly useful. 

But there are many branches of work, 
less romantic, it is true, but vitally 
necessary, open to the American woman. 

First: She can, and should, join the 
Red Cross. It costs one dollar. For 
particulars, see the announcement on 
page 20. 

Second: She can cultivate a garden. 

Third: She can and must economize. 
There is no work more important than 
this. 

Secretary of the Interior Lane gives 
this advice upon the activities of women 
in war time : 

"The women of America can do no 
greater work at this time than to raise 
their own vegetables, can their own fruit, 
prevent waste in their homes, and give 
impulse and enthusiasm to the men of 
the land. If they do this they will be 
doing a good fifty per cent, of the fighting. 
Why not organize all the women's clubs 
of the United States into a 'lend a hand 
to Wilson League/ whose business it will 
be to carry on a propaganda for the 
things the nation will need — soldiers, 
ships, wheat, pigs, beans." 



Mrs. RAILROADER: 

Are you doing your part in helping to win the war? 
Food saved in America means more food for our allies. 
Economy is the submarine's most deadly enemy. 



1 / 

ii 

i 

+i 

— 4 



^3*=>E>CIAIv MERIT R,OIvb 



Staten Island Division 

The following letter speaks for itself, and for 
extra passenger trainman Brunskill's honesty: 

4873 SOUTHFIELD BOULEVARD, 

Eltingeville, S. I. 

New York City, April 25, 1917. 

General Manager, 
Staten Island R. T. Railway Co., 
New York City. 

Dear Sir: 

I beg to call to your attention an incident 
that occurred last week, which reflects con- 
siderable credit upon one of your extra brake- 
men, Charles Brunskill. 

I was travelling to Eltingeville on the train 
that meets the 6.15 p. m. boat from New 
York, and accidentally dropped my pocket 
book, containing $197 in bills of small denomi- 
nation, in the smoking car. Failing to notice 
my loss until late in the evening; it was only at 
8.30 the next morning that I was able to get 
in touch with Mr. Brennan, the conductor of 
the train. He informed me that the money 
was safe, that it had been found by Mr. Brun- 
skill (who was alone in the car at the time he 
found it) and that the latter had immediately 
reported the find to him. 

I am bringing this matter to your attention 
in the same spirit of appreciation that I, as an 
employer of labor, would welcome some refer- 
ence to a particular act of integrity on the 
part of one of my employes. 

Yours very truly, 

AUGUSTE GUERBER. 

Superintendent Hanlin has written to Mr. 
Brunskill, expressing the management's ap- 
preciation of his action. 

On May 4 trainman Thomas Watson, of train 
No. 103, discovered a defective track condition 
in Milliken's No. 1, placed red flag and reported 
the condition to the dispatcher. 

On May 6 E. Mclntire, master of the tug- 
boat "Baltimore," while laying boat up, dis- 
covered the lighter "Weverton" riding under 



barge "Anna C" and causing damage to the 
"Anna C." He shifted the "Weverton" to a 
safe berth. 

On April 8 agent Joseph King noticed a de- 
fective condition on car in extra west 1633. He 
notified the dispatcher, who had car inspected 
at Western Avenue. 

At about 5.00 a. m. on May 18 a fire was 
discovered in a box car in the east end of St. 
George yard. The alarm was immediately 
given by John Shepard, operator, tower "A," 
and fireman Carl White. Yard engines and 
tug boats responded and had five or six streams 
on the fire and had it under control by the time 
the city fire department arrived. This fire oc- 
curred in a very crowded section of the yard, and 
our yard and tug boat men deserve credit for 
their prompt and efficient work. The following 
general notice was issued by superintendent 
Hanlin: "The management wishes to express its 
appreciation of, and thanks for, the prompt and 
efficient work of its employes in connection 
with fire in St. George yard on May 18." 

Philadelphia Division 

On May 7 assistant supervisor H. W. Routen- 
berg discovered a defective condition on a car 
in train of extra west 4086. He notified the 
crew to handle the car carefully and it was set 
off at Richardson. Mr. Routenberg is com- 
mended for his vigilance. 

On February 28, at Clay Pit Siding, Broad 
Run, two cars, one empty and the other loaded 
with clay, were derailed. Because of damaged 
track the engine could not rerail the cars, and 
they were left on the ground to be rerailed next 
day. 

Foreman Grady, with two men and two 
track jacks, raised both cars, repaired the track 
and replaced the cars on the rails. Next day 
the empty was spotted at Clay Pit and the load 
went to its destination without the delay 
which would have attended their rerailing by 
the train crew. 



40 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Mr. Grady, in going out of his way to insure 
a quick movement of these cars, showed an 
interest in his Company's business which is 
highly commendable. 

Baltimore Division 

On May 4 second trick operator J. C. 
Dougherty, on duty at Bay View Tower, 
observed a defective condition of equipment on 
car in train of extra east 4047. He immediately 
notified the dispatcher at Philadelphia. The 
train was stopped at Poplar and the trouble 
corrected. 

On May 4 operator W. F. Hill, on duty on 
last trick at Boyds, Metropolitan Branch, 
observed a defective condition of equipment 
on express car 701, in train No. 13. He im- 
mediately threw advance signal on train, 
waving down conductor, and succeeded in 
stopping train. 

On the afternoon of May 9 night foreman 
B. H. Prenger, while on his way to work, 
discovered a fire on our trestle in hopper yard, 
Locust Point. He extinguished the blaze 
with a bucket of water. If the fire, which was 



probably caused by hot coals, had gained 
headway it would have been serious, as this is 
an important trestle. 

Trackman C. G. Biddinger, while working a 
half mile west of Woodstock on April 25, 
noticed the defective condition of a car in an 
eastbound freight train. He notified the 
crew, who set the car off. 

On April 27 trackman O. Porter noticed a 
defective condition on a car in an eastbound 
freight train passing Woodstock. He notified 
the operator, who had the train stopped and 
car set off at Hollofields. Mr. Porter has been 
in the service for about eighteen years. 

Cumberland Division 

As No. 46 pulled into the station at Keyser 
on April 19, at its usual speed, two small 
children started to cross the tracks in front of 
the train, then less than one hundred feet 
away. Ticket clerk Harry B. Kight, who was 
standing on the platform, at great personal 
risk, went to their assistance. He managed to 
catch the little girl with his right hand and 
the boy with his left, and to pull them to 



Special Service Rendered by Cumberland Division Operators 
During Month of April, 1917 



Name 



Location 



Irregularity 



S. E. Schroder. . . 
S. E. Schroder... 

J. Coyle 

S. E. Schroder 

J. L. Schroder. . . 

C. H. Lovenstine . 
J. L. Schroder. . . 

E. O. Fouch 

O. J. Rash 

A. W. Shewbridge 
S. E. Schroder. . . 
J. L. Schroder. . . 

J. Coyle 

S. E. Schroder. . . 

V. L>. Twigg 

S. E, Schroder . 

S. 1']. Schroder. . . 
S. E. Schroder. . . 
V. I). Twigg 

D. W. Walters... 
VV. C. Ready. . . . 
J. L. Schroder. 

E. II . Cross 

\\ . M. Maloney 
E. C). Fouch. .... 
C. L. Virts 



Hancock Equipment. 

Hancock. . . . 
Rodemer. . . 
Hancock. . . . 
Martinsburg 
Piedmont. . . 

Martinsburg ! Hot box. 

Mountain Lake Park j Equipment. 

Hancock 1 Shifted load 

Harper's Ferry Car derailed 



Hancock 
Martinsburg 
Rodemer. . . 



Hancock 

Green Spring 

Hancock 

Hancock 

Hancock 

( ireen Spring 

Altamont 

Mountain Lake Park 

Martinsburg 

Okonoko 

Newburg 

Mountain Lake Park 

Oakland 



Open door on loaded car. 
Equipment. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



.31 



safety just as the train reached the spot where 
they were standing. Mr. Kight's gallant 
action undoubtedly saved the lives of these 
children and he is most highly commended. 

Engineer V. E. Lynch has been commended 
for the valuable assistance he gave the fire 
department in extinguishing a fire at the 
shops at Hardman, on May 4. 

Monongah Division 

Mr. Glen Gillum, of Alton, W. Va., while 
walking to Alexander on May 16, discovered 
a defective track condition and upon his 
arrival reported the matter to the agent. 
The necessary steps to protect trains were 
taken. 

Curtis Gould, fifteen years old, of Alexander, 
W. Va., walking behind Mr. Gillum, also 
discovered the condition and reported it to 
the agent. This is the second time that Mr. 
Gould has discovered defective track condi- 
tions. Once before he discovered one west of 
Alexander and flagged No. 57. 

Superintendent Scott has written to both 
gentlemen, thanking them for their kindness. 

On the evening -of May 6 operator D. P. 
Ferree noticed defective conditions of equip- 
ment on two cars in train second No. 94. He 
succeeded in stopping the train and the defective 
cars were set off for repairs. He is highly 
commended for his work on this and another 
recent occasion. 

Superintendent Scott has written to Messrs. 
Davis and Thomas Smith, the sons of Mr. 
W. H. Smith, superintendent of the Harrison 
Mine, at Rosemont, and to their father, thank- 
ing them for removing an obstruction from our 
track near Rosemont on the night of May 1. 
Their kindness is greatly appreciated. 

Wheeling Division 

While going to work on a speeder on April 22 
operator W. F. Hawkins found a defective 
track condition one mile east of "CY" Tower 
and took immediate action to have it corrected. 

On May 9 yard brakeman W. B. Brown 
discovered a defective condition in eastbound 
main track, Benwood Yard, and immediately 
notified section forces to make necessary 
repairs. 




J. M. SEELEY 



On May 11 engineer John P'innegan, with yard 
engine 1913, observed a derailed car in train 
No. 91 in Benwood Yard. He is commended 
for his prompt action in having the train 
stopped. 

Cleveland Division 

G. W. Eaton, operator at Boston Mill, is 
commended for observing a defect on car in 
train extra 2618 while 
it was passing his sta- 
tion on April 25. He 
notified the conductor 
at Peninsula, who 
stopped the train and 
made the necessary 
repairs. 

J. M. Seeley, section 
foreman at Grafton, 
O., is commended for 
observing a defect on 
car in train of extra 
west engine 4215 on April 21. He notified the 
conductor, who had the car set off at Erhart. 

Pittsburgh Division 

We extend our thanks to Mr. J. R. Hartnett, 
of the National Transit Co., Kane, Pa., for his 
efforts in helping to extinguish a fire near our 
bridge east of Kane, on April 18. His action 
is much appreciated. 

Glenwood Shops 

On February 21, while Joseph Hannaway was 
working on an axle lathe, his clothes were 
caught, and but for the alertness of machinist 
Charles Bell, who turned off the power, his 
serious injury might have resulted. 

On May 5 B. H. Rush, material supervisor, 
noticed a defective condition of equipment on 
a Hocking Valley car. He promptly notified 
Laughlin Junction, which was the next point, 
and had the car set off and necessary repairs 
made. He is commended for his alertness and 
interest. 

Chicago Division 

Yard conductor G. A. Oakley is commended 
for discovering and reporting a defective con- 
dition in track No. 10, in the eastboimd classi- 
fication yards. 

On Apr 1 30 brakeman W. H. Myers dis- 
covered a defective track condition on west- 
bound main track, west of coal chutes at 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Deshler, Ohio. He informed the track fore- 
man, so that repairs could be made. 

On May 13 conductor R. H. Moran discovered 
a bridge east of Auburn Junction afire and 
personally extinguished the blaze. A credit 
entry has been placed on his service record. 

The service record of operator G. H. Harer has 
been reviewed by superintendent Jackson, in 
view of his extremely good record, and he has 
been commended. Mr. Harer has been in the 
service for nineteen 
years and has a clear 
record. 

Ohio Division 

L. Wallace, agent at 
Midland City, is com- 
mended for discover- 
ing a defective condi- 
tion of equipment on 
car in train No. 90. 
He flagged train and 
had repairs made. 




L. WALLACE 



Indiana Division 

On May 8 E. C. Raney, flagman with work 
train, discovered a defective condition of equip- 
ment on car in extra west 2764, at Delhi. As 
he was unable to stop the train from his position 
on the ground he climbed to the top of car and 
did so. He is commended. 



Wellston Division 

Third trick operator Pratt, at RK Tower, 
discovered a defective condition on car in extra 
west 414-416 on May 11. Being unable to 
communicate with crew, he informed the dis- 
patcher, who had conductor Dudley look over 
his train at Washington Court House, where 
this defective condition was discovered and 
remedied. 

Section laborer "Dan" Cuttler found a defec- 
tive track condition on Bridge 67, Washington 
Court House, while going to work on May 8. 
He reported it, and it was remedied. 



n 



— 
— 



"S. S." Letters of Honor for the Young Man 
"Selected for Service" 

America is writing a new exalted order into her national life. 

This is the Select Service order — the great and honorable roll of men selected to 
serve in America's army of the Lord. 

This great army of fine men is to be created under the new Selective Service law. 

It is to be an army of men selected by Uncle Sam for the highest service mankind 
knows today. 

Service in this new army is something to be sought for — a promotion from the ranks 
of ordinary men! 

Selected for Service in the great cause of human liberty — selected for the service 
of humanity, selected for the service of civilization. 

Every American tradition of freedom and civilization, every tradition of honor and 
duty, goes with this new army of selected men. 

Mothers will be proud — if they are true American mothers — when their stalwart 
sons are selected for this most select of all Select Services. 

Well might we wish that "S. S." might be the letters on the uniform of every one of 
these new soldiers of freedom— these soldiers of world liberation. — The Cincinnati Post 



AMONG OURSELVES 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Auditor Freight Claims' Office 

Correspondent, H. Irving Martin 

The "Better Way" Association of the 0. 
S. & D. Division had its final meeting of the 
season on May 10. 

The last sessions of this association have 
been devoted to the study of proper methods 
of handling and filling forms. The question of 
matching shorts with overs also came up for 
full discussion. Mr. Doyle gave graphic de- 
scriptions of the methods employed for clearing 
the line after wrecks, covering the fine points 
of salvaging freight so as to reduce the actual 
loss to a minimum. The old days when a 
wreck was followed by the burning of cars 
hastily pulled off the right of way have happily 
gone forever. 

The Operating Department wants to use the 
track, but cooperates to leave damaged equip- 
ment in such shape that the "Salvage Corps" 
may do effective work to preserve values. 
Savings here help to hold up freight revenue. 

The baseball team has acquired membership 
in the Industrial League and is scheduled to 
meet teams from the Standard Oil Company 
and the Carr-Lowry Glass Company. 

Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, J. Limpert 

F. B. Milnor, head clerk of the Settlement 
Bureau, has been proposed and accepted as a 
member of the Baltimore Division Veterans' 
Association. He is, in all probability, the 
youngest member of the Association, being 



but thirty-four years old. He entered the 
service on February 18, 1897, in the office of the 
auditor of revenue and was transferred to this 
office on June 1, 1902. 

J. F. Shea has been transferred to the office of 
the auditor of freight claims, as loss and damage 
claim investigator. The best wishes of his 
fellow clerks follow him. 

W. J. Hartwig and C. A. Luken were sent 
to Keyser recently to assist agent Tucker in 
getting the work up-to-date. On the way 
back Mr. Hartwig stopped off at Cumberland 
and gave agent Beggs a little lift. 

"Little" Joe Heine, in addition to being 
one of the prominent soloists of the Relay 
Minstrels, is quite some farmer. If hard work 
is going to produce any results, that 70 x 150 
plot of ground at Relay will be forced to give 
up food aplenty during the coming months, and 
will help materially to bring food prices down 
to a reasonable figure. 

"Joe" does not let anything interfere with his 
garden work, and, after a hard day (and fre- 
quently a night) in the office, a couple of hours 
are put in on the "farm" — and then nothing to 
do until tomorrow, when he bounces out of the 
hay and puts in a few more hours before break- 
fast. Pretty soft, hey bo? 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, Fred. B. Kohler, Clerk 
Pier 22 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. Michelson Terminal Cashier 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

53 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



T. Kavanaugh Freight Agent , 26th Street 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M. F. Steinberger Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

C. E. Floom Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

E. J. Kehoe Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wallabout 

Marine Department Members 

Permanent 

E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 

E. J. Kelly Assistant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 

E. Salisbury Lighterage Supervisor 

Rotating Members (appointed for three months) 

C. H. Kearney Tugboat Captain 

W. Cornell Tugboat Engineer 

W. Meade Tugboat Fireman 

M. Y. Groff .. . .Lighterage Runner 

E. Sodeberg Barge Captain 

Otto Olsen Gas Hoist Captain 

H. Peterson Steam Hoist Captain 

J . Hall Steam Hoist Engineer 

Walter Kelly Deckhand 



We have had several changes at the different 
stations of the New York Terminal Properties, 
as will be noted from the new Divisional 
Safety Committee. Mr. Michelson has been 
appointed terminal cashier and is in direct 
charge of the operating force at Pier 22, North 
River. Mr. Kavanaugh, formerly of Mr. 
Allen's office, 295 Broadway, has been ap- 
pointed agent at 26th Street Station, vice 
T. F. Gorman, who has been re-appointed 
agent at Pier 7, North River, in place of Mr. 
Floom, who has been made agent at St. George 
Transfer, vice F. W. Nolan, who has answered 
the call of Uncle Sam and joined the Naval 
Reserve. He is stationed on a ship of the U. S. 
Fleet. 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, F. G. Nodocker. Superin- 
tendent's Office, St. George 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanlin .Chairman, Superintendent 

B. F. Kelly Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

S. A. Turvey Secretary, Trainmaster's and Marine Clerk 

H. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

A. Conley Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. DeRevere Medical Examiner 

J. B. Sharp Agent, St. George Coal Piers 

F. VV. Nolan Agent, St. George Transfer 

P. A. Witherspoon Track Supervisor 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

J. F. McGoWAM Division Operator 

\V. E. Connell Supervisor of Crossing Watchmen 

P. Peterson Division Agent 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members 

J. P. Miller Towerman 

T. V. Hrennen Conductor 

C ; . Mr; Kin non Mach inist 

Harry Harry Foreman Painter 

A. L. ( ! umm is key Car Inspector 

Ai.vin RaCSCHBR Tran.sitman 

('.. Hartman Engineer 

A. Nichols Fireman 

Joseph IfcDoNAbO Signal Repairman 

II. Owe N h Trainman 

M. F. Win-ant Agent,, Port Richmond 

('.. B. Stansiujky , ... Investigator, Representing Track Dep't 



To a W ell Wisher: 

The Editor acknowledges with thanks a 
letter dated May 9 from a "Well Wisher" on 
this division. The reduction in the size of the 
Magazine has made it necessary for us to cut 
down the size of all departments and the 
"Among Ourselves" feature of the Magazine 
suffered with other features. Hence certain 
notes in regard to appointments which may 
have been sent in for publication have possibly 
been eliminated. Mr. Groeling, former corre- 
spondent, wrote us some time ago that he 
would have to resign on account of the greater 
responsibilities of his new position. We wish 
to thank Mr. Groeling for his untiring interest 
in making his divisional notes interesting and 
profitable. 

In January Mr. Ordeman was appointed 
division engineer on Staten Island, his position 
as supervisor being filled by the promotion of 
Mr. Witherspoon, of the Pittsburgh Division. 

Jerry R. Hoge and William S. Martin, chain- 
men in the Engineering Department of the New 
York District, enlisted, on April 28, in the 
Twenty-Fifth Company (Regular Army), Engi- 
neers, and are now in training. 

Field engineer Jesse Gover has been recom- 
mended for a commission in the Officers' Engi- 
neer Reserve Corps, and left for Plattsburg on 
May 13. "Jess" was a member of Troop F, 
First New York State Cavalry, and was with 
them on the border for about nine months. 
We all wish him success, and a commission, 
which he fully deserves. 

J. Camden Brady, draftsman in the Valuation 
Department, left for Fort Myer, Virginia, on 
May 6 to take up training with the Officers' 
Engineer Reserve Corps. Mr. Brady has been 
recommended for a commission. 

We are pleased to announce the following 
promotions in the Engineering Department, 
effective June 1 : William S. Morris, assistant 
abstracter, Valuation Department, to the posi- 
tion of field engineer, Engineering Department; 
Alvin Rauscher, levelman, to transitman; 
Hugh J. Canlon, rodman, to levelman, and C. 
Spencer Christopher, chainman, to rodman. 

William S. Graham, Inspector, lias left the 
service and accept ed a posil ion wit h t he Bethle- 
hem Si eel Company, at Sparrow's Point, Md. 
We all wish "Red" success in his new under- 
taking. 

On the evening of May 17 the Staten Island 
Railroad Club celebrated its first anniversary 
at the Livingston Club House. There was a 
large at tendance and all present spent a very 
enjoyable evening in singing, dancing, etc., 
after which refreshments were served. W. J. 
Kenny made an interesting address. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



55 



The following employes of this division have 
been furloughed to join the colors: L. Cope- 
land, Clyde Ivans, H. Covonti, trainman, and 
Frank W. Nolan, agent at St. George Transfer. 

On April 11 Walter R. Taylor, car distributer 
at St. George, sailed forth on the sea of matri- 
mony. He spent his honeymoon at Niagara 
Falls. 

On the evening of May 7 the Staten Island 
Railroad Club held its annual meeting at the 
Livingston Club House and elected the follow- 
ing officers for the ensuing year: president, 
E. E. McKinley; vice-president, John B. Sharp; 
treasurer, Joseph S. Fabregas, and secretary, 
S. A. Turvey. 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondent, J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

S. T. Cantrell. . Chairman, Superintendent 

W. T. R. Hoddinott Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

G. F. Eberly Division Engineer 

J. P. Hines Master Mechanic 

H. K. Hartman Chief Train Dispatcher 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

F. J. Young Captain of Police 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

B. S. Daniels Road Engineer 

Hood Simpson Road Fireman 

W. T. Marvel Road Conductor 

J. C. Willl\ms Yard Conductor 

W. A. Tangye Coppersmith, Shopman 

Edward Marker Car Builder, Repair Yardman 

R. C. Acton Secretary 



H. E. Stark, formerly agent at Cowenton, 
Md., and for the last year agent at Aberdeen, 
has resigned to enter another line of business. 

Theodore Bloecher, Jr., formerly assistant 
division engineer, was, on May 1, appointed 
division engineer of the Philadelphia Division. 
His many friends are glad to welcome him back 
to the Division. 

J. R. Coulter, yard conductor, who had been 
on the sick list for some time, died on April 27. 
"Jim" will be missed by his many friends. He 
was a Veteran. 

C. E. Hollingsworth is acting ticket agent at 
Chester. ''Holly" is one of our relief operators 
and agents. 

E. H. Tomlinson, conductor at 24th and 
Chestnut Streets passenger station, who has 
been on the sick list for some months, has 
resumed duty, being assigned to work at Pier 
No. 40. "Tub's" many friends are glad to see 
him back in harness. 

The picture at top of page is of Mr. and Mrs. 
L. T. Willis. Mr. Willis is carpenter foreman 
of the Philadelphia Division and has thirty- 
seven years' service to his credit. 




MR. AND MRS. L. T. WILLIS 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superintendent' s 
Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. B. Gorsuch Chairman, Superintendent 

R. A. Grammes Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Brunswick 

G. H. Winslow Secretary, Washington 

Relief Department 
E. H. Mathers, M. D. . .Medical Examiner, Camden Station 

J. A. Robb, M. D Medical Examiner, Washington 

J. F. Ward, M. D Medical Examiner, Winchester 

Transportation Department 

R. B. Banks • Division Claim Agent, Baltimore 

J. M. Powell Captain of Police, Camden Station 

S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick 

C. A. Mewshaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J. J. McCabe . Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Agent, Brunswick 

W. E. Neilson Agent, Camden Station 

J. W. Lugenbeel Freight Conductor, Riverside 

T. B. Stringer Freight Engineer, Riverside 

A. B. McGrECHiE Passenger Fireman, Riverside 

G. Lay Yard Conductor, Camden Yard 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

C. A. Waskey Supervisor, Washington Junction 

E. D. Calvert Supervisor, Winchester, Va. 

R. A. Porter Section Foreman, Marriottsville 

R. A. Leach Leading Carpenter, Camden Station 

W. H. Hobbs Signal Repairman, Washington Junction 

Motive Power Department 

T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Wtllumson General Car Foreman, Baileys 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

L. E. Stille Foreman Air Brakes, Riverside 

M. L. Hoffmaster Assistant Car Foreman, Brunswick 

R. E. Sigafoose Clerk to General Foreman, Brunswick 

T. Shakespeare Gang Foreman, Locust Point 

J. G. Dahlem Clerk to Car Foreman, Baileys 

Effective April 23 J. J. Swartzback was 
appointed terminal trainmaster of the Balti- 
more Terminals. 

Members of the Riverside Y. M. C. A. had 
the pleasure of greeting their old friend Miss 
Jennie Smith on the afternoon of Sunday, May 6. 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




MR. EGIL STEEN 

Photo by Bachrach 

Miss Smith, assisted by Mrs. D. Shaffer, 
conducted a service that was greatly enjoyed 
by "her boys." After the meeting the party 
went to the home of Mrs. C. Hile, Sr., where a 
birthday dinner was served in honor of the 
hostess's son, engineer C. C. Hile, Jr. 

On April 14 a patriotic demonstration took 
place at Locust Point, the occasion being the 
unfurling of "Old Glory," when several hundred 
employes of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
and the Baltimore Chamber of Commerce took 
part in the flag raising celebration at the ele- 
vators. The flag and pole were presented by 
the employes. The Fourth Regiment Band 
played patriotic anthems during the ceremony. 
A detachment from the regiment also attended. 

The speaker of the occasion was Mr. Egil 
Steen, of E. Steen <fe Bro., and a director of the 
Baltimore Chamber of Commerce. 

Mr. Steen's speech, which was pithy, short 
and right to the point, was loudly applauded. 

Among those present were: Colonel Harry 
C. Jones and Captain Milton Roberts of the 
Fourth Regiment; superintendent of elevators 
Jamefl H. Warren and S. D. Thomas, chief 
inspector of grains for the Chamber of 

Commerce. 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretary 
Y. M. C, A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

13, If. Winhi.ow Chairman, Secretary, Y. M.C. A. 

I)K P, II Sjf.i.iz Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 



Motive Power Department 

G. W. Kiehm Air Brake Supervisor 

W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C. J. Ayers Gang Leader 

A. F. Kreglow Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

G. F. Mergell Foreman of Electricians 

J. J. Desmond Gang Leader 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Hendrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

J. McCauley Assistant Yardmaster 

L. T. Keane Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 

Maintenance of Way Department 
W. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A. M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Richman Signal Maintainer 

H. R. Callahan Signal Foreman 

Summer has brought the perennial baseball 
and tennis in its wake. Terminal Railroad 
Y. M. C. A. men, early in the spring, caught 
the spirit of oncoming summer, and had a well- 
organized baseball league ready for play on 
April 28. The league consists of four teams, 
viz.: Washington Terminal Car Department, 
Southern General Office, Washington Terminal 
Shops and Southern Auditors. A schedule of 
forty-eight games, in two sections, was ar- 
ranged, the first section extending from April 
28 to June 11, and the second from June 18 to 
July 31. 

As evidence of the patriotic spirit of our 
members it gives us great pleasure to call at- 
tention to the several flag raisings which have 
recently been held on the property. 

The first was that held in the coach yard on 
April 27. J. F. Conner, car foreman, was 
master of ceremonies, first raising the flag on 
the administration building at the yard, and 
then coming down and introducing the speaker 
for the occasion, W. J. Wilson, superintendent 
of the Washington Terminal Company. Mr. 
Conner is the oldest man in service in the yard, 
having entered railroad employ in June, 1882. 
Patriotic singing was a part of the ceremony in 
which the women employes were prominent. 

Another flag raising was held at the Ivy City 
Shops on May 18. A committee of men em- 
ployed in the roundhouse, consisting of C. B. 
Cramer, chairman, W. M. Grant, W. E. Thomas 
and James Buckner arranged the affair, which 
was heartily supported by their fellow work- 
men. The idea originated in Mr. Thomas' 
mind and he secured the interest and coopera- 
tion of the other men. C. R. McKinsey, master 
mechanic, was master of ceremonies for this 
occasion. Music was furnished by the Terminal 
Railroad Y. M. C. A. Orchestra,' C. W. Guest, 
director. After an opening selection by the 
orchestra, Mr. McKinsey made a short intro- 
ductory address after which he invited all the 
Ladies present to get a hand on the rope and 
help raise t he flag. As t he men did not believe 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



57 



in doing things by halves, they secured two 
flags eight by ten feet, so that they would 
always have one to fly when the other was being 
cleaned or repaired. Then the flag was raised, 
while the audience stood with uncovered heads 
listening to the strains of "The Star Spangled 
Banner." Mr. McKinsey then introduced the 
speaker, superintendent Wilson, who delivered 
an able address. Passing engines tooted their 
whistles and train crews waved their hats in 
recognition of the event. After the speaking 
small flags were distributed to those present. 
At the car repair shop adjacent to the round- 
house a smaller flag was raised. 

We take pride in reporting that many of our 
men are snowing loyalty and patriotism in 
another way— by raising vegetables. A num- 
ber of them have rented or secured vacant lots 
and are cultivating them. Success to them ! 

Congratulations are in order to Charles P. 
Soper, one of the auditor's force. He is the 
proud father of a boy who was born on May 18. 
Good health and long life to the newcomer! 

Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, Chief Clerk 

Because the Freight Station correspondent 
has been ill with an attack of pneumonia for 
six weeks there have been no notes from this 



station for April or May. He is, however, very 
glad to report his return to duty, and to be 
once more on the job. 

Of course the uppermost thought in the minds 
of Washingtonians, in common with the rest of 
the people of America, is war. Thus far, we 
have lost only three men from this station, 
E. G. Taubersmitt and G. N. Benjamin from the 
platform, and Theodore W. English from the 
office force. These men are all members of the 
District National Guard and were recalled to 
duty. There are, however, quite a large num- 
ber who will be called upon to "toe the line" on 
registration day. 

There have been various changes in our 
office during the past month. 

C. E. Stanford, O. S. & D. clerk, resigned to 
take a position with our friends of the Southern 
Railway, and is succeeded by an old Washington 
employe, John H. Huhn, who is putting forth 
every effort to induce our patrons to remove 
their freight from the platform, and thus keep 
Washington from being placed on the embargo 
list. 

J. T. Stone recently resigned the position of 
waybill clerk and is succeeded by H. L. Ticer, 
who comes to us from the Southern Railway. 
It shows a spirit of reciprocity — they get Stan- 
ford and we get Ticer. 



TIME RECORD 




Time Records Prove 
South Bend Accuracy 

FROM inspection to inspection with only 
occasionally a few seconds fast or slow— 
that's the service South Bend Stude- 
baker Watches give. 

This accuracy is the result of in-built quality; 
— quality which enables us to guarantee 
this watch as no other watch is guaranteed. 

The Unequalled 
South Bend Guarantee 

South Bend Studebaker Watches are guar- 
anteed to meet the requirements of the 
road you now work on, or any road to which 
you may transfer within the next five years. 

Your jeweler will tell you of the many 
other reasons why you should buy the 
Watch of Purple Ribbon Quality. 

SOUTH BEND WATCH CO. 
186 Studebaker St. South Bend.Ind. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



58 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The Accounting Department lost the services 
of Adrian F. Carey on April 30, he having 
secured a position under W. E. Neilson, at 
Camden Station. B. F. Bratcher, who was 
employed in our yard, succeeded Mr. Carey. 

Our first young lady clerk, Miss Clara Porton, 
is filling the position of stenographer, from 
which our gallant soldier boy, Theodore Eng- 
lish, was called to the colors. 

The appearance of our team tracks and freight 
shed would not lead anyone to think that there 
is a slump in business. Our platforms have 
more the appearance of a busy October than 
the usually comparatively quiet month of May. 



Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Morgan, Secretary 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



L. Finegan Chairman, Superintendent of Shops 

J. McDonough Vice-Chairman, Ass't Sup't of Shops 

W. L. Morgan Secretary, Sec'y to Sup't of Shops 

H. A. Beaumont General Car Foreman 

J. Howe General Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

A. E. Bobbett Shop Hand, Erecting Shop 

B- F. Weber Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 




THE I A 'I E U. 8. <;. GARBER 



Wilford Davis Machinist, No. 1 Machine Shop 

E. C. Riland Machinist, No. 2 Machine Shop 

C. N. Southcomb Tinner, Tin and Pipe Shop 

M. Gahan Coremaker, Foundries and Re-rolling Mill 

S. Romanov.. .Blacksmith, Blacksmith Shop and Flue Plant 
W. Schmoll Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

F. C. Wood Machinist, Air Brake Shop 

C. W. Hoke Pattern Maker, Pattern Shop 

A. G. Rig gins Machine Operator Helper, Steel Car 

Plant and No. 3 Machine Shop 

C. W. Armiger Tender Repairman, Tender and 

Tender Paint Shops 

M. Kelly Machine Operator, Axle Shop and 

Power Plant 

Thos. P. Griffin Assistant Foreman, Freight Car Track 

A. R. King Passenger Car Builder, Passenger 

Car Erecting Shop 
J. E. Tatum. . . .Pipe Fitter, Passenger Car Paint, 

Finishing and Upholstering Shops 
Chas. Wilhelm. . . .Mill Machine Hand, Saw Mill and 

Cabinet Shops 

H. Lauman Shipping Clerk, Storehouse 

On April 22 Ulysses S. Grant Garber died 
and Mount Clare lost one of its oldest men, as 
well as one who was liked by everybody who 
knew him. 

Mr. Garber, who was a bachelor, is a brother 
of our faithful watchman at the Arlington Ave- 
nue gate, was born in Baltimore on May 22, 
1866. Had he lived one month more he would 
have celebrated his fifty-first birthday and 
would have completed thirty-five years of 
service for our railroad, as a blacksmith. 

He attended public school until sixteen years 
old and then came to Mount Clare. While in 
school he broke his leg, an accident which 
crippled him for life. 

He became ill at his home and was taken to 
the home of his brother, William T. Garber, 
where he died of heart failure. His brother 
was at his side when he passed away. 

Mr. Garber' s sudden death was a severe 
shock to his many friends. 

The funeral service was held in the home of 
his brother by Dr. Heisse, of Union Square 
M. E. Church, of which Mr. Garber had been a 
life long member. 

The employment of women in the various 
shops at Mount Clare has caused quite a sen- 
sation, but, with the number of them now 
employed, the novelty has gone, and the other 
employes have become accustomed to seeing 
tne fair workers in their modern working 
costumes. Women have been assigned to 
various work in the shops, some on machines, 
others cleaning the yard, on the freight track 
and in similar lines of work. Some of I hem are 
making a big success in their machine work and 
it is thought that the venture will be. a 

success. 

Miss lYI. L. Goetzinger is a newcomer at 
Mount, Clare, having been transferred from the 
office of Hie superintended of car service. We 
were all glad to welcome this efficient Little busi- 
ness lady to the office of the superintendent of 
shops. 

Miss M. Flaherty has been appointed tele- 
phone operator at Mtounl Clare, vice Miss 
L. I,. Gaither, resigned. Miss Flaherty was 
transferred from the Central Building, where 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



59 




EDWARD SMITH 



she was employed for about a year. Her 
businesslike voice over the wire is pleasing to 
the ear, and we are sure of getting the best of 
service. 

Our old friend T. J. Collins has returned from 
Florida to take the position of chief clerk to 
Mr. Paullis, head of the Shop Order Bureau. 
"Tommy" says he likes the southland very 
much, but that "Back, Back to Baltimore," 
sounds mighty good to him. 

C. E. Harten, employed as a clerk in the office 
of the superintendent of shops, has been trans- 
ferred to the shop to take up a machinist 
apprenticeship. 

The accountant's office at Mount Clare has 
been unusually slow in adding to their office 
force by the employment of some of the fair 
sex, but at last they have awakened. Miss 
E. Albaugh and Miss C. Connelly have recently 
accepted positions and like their work very 
much. 

Miss Helen Davis has accepted a position as 
a clerk in the office of the superintendent of 
shops. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbatjgh, Division Operator 
Thomas R. Rees, Secretary to Superintendent 
W. C. Montignani, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
C. L. Kalbaugh. Chief Clerk to Master Mechanic 

Divisional Safety Committee 

G. D. Brooke Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Deneen Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt., East End 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshonce Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



L. J. Wilmoth Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carxev Road Foreman, West End 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

R. B. Stout Assistant Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

Dr. J. A. Dorner Medical Examiner 

Dr. F. H. D. Biser Medical Examiner 

Dr. L. D. Norris Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

\V. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

E. E. Dean Car Foreman, East End 

W. T. Davis Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

W. M. Hixkey Storekeeper 

W. S. Harig Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Spoxseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Taylor .Master Carpenter 

W. L. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. Montignani. .Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
A. L. Brown Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. R. Reckley Freight Engineer 

O. E. Pace Freight Fireman 

J. W. McMackin Freight Conductor 

H. H. Barley Yard Brakeman 

J. G. Defibaugh Machinist 

R. L. Fields Car Inspector 

J. C. Snyder Operator 

Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association of 
Cumberland, Md. 

President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

R. B. Stout Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

D. H. Street Division Freight Agent 

W. H. Linn General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

T. F. Shaffer Chief Clerk to Division Engineer 



The accompanying picture is of the two sons 
of W. H. Virts, general yardmaster at Keyser. 
They have both enlisted in the Navy. 

The gentleman on the left is Harry Thomas 
Virts, nineteen years old, formerly a machin- 
ist's helper at Keyser. His brother, Raymond 
W. Virts, was chief caller at Keyser. Good 
luck to these gallant tars. 




HARRY THOMAS AN'D RAYMOND W. VIRTS 



The shooting park of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Athletic Association of Cumberland, located on 
the athletic field of the association, was for- 
mally opened on May 19, fifteen contestants, 
including visitors, taking part in the shooting. 

A number of prizes, donated by the merchants 
and business firms of the city, were distributed. 
The S. T. Little Jewelry Company of Cumber- 
land presented to the club a handsome silver 
loving cup, suitably engraved, which will be 
shot for each week, the employe winning the 
cup three times during the season to retain it. 

Much encouragement is afforded the employes 
by the friendly attitude of the citizens of Cum- 
berland toward the association, quite a number 
visiting the grounds and in some cases actively 
entering into the sport. 

The association is fortunate in having its 
athletic field located in the center of the city, 
making it very convenient. The baseball 
grounds are located on the same field. 

Dr. Lester D. Norris has been made medical 
examiner at Fairmont. Dr. J. H. Mayer has 
been transferred from Cumberland to Keyser 
to fill the vacancy caused by the promotion of 
Dr. Norris. "Doc" Norris is a good fellow 
and had many friends here (especially among 
the fair sex) and we shall miss him. We wel- 
come Dr. Mayer. 

Boyd Grayson, after several years in the 
service, has resigned. 

Several of the Baltimore and Ohio boys are 
doing their bit to help Uncle Sam win the 
war by cultivating some of the land along the 
right-of-way. 

Telegraph linemen have taken down the 
overhead cable that ran across the tracks at 
the passenger station and placed it underground, 
eliminating an unsightly and unsafe condition. 

"Grand pa" Hodges, first trick operator at 
Keyser station, expects a good crop of peaches 
this year. His orchard is a few miles from 
town. 

"Batch" Fazenbaker, chief clerk to train- 
master Welshonce, went fishing the other day 
and reports a good catch. We didn't see the 
fish — but we'll take his word for them. 

Keyser 

Roy Mulledy, for some time cashier at the 
freight house, has resigned. Miss M. Dott 
Louck has been appointed cashier, vice Mr. 
Mulledy. Miss Marguerite Greenwade has 
been appointed stenographer to agent, vice 
Miss Louck. 

A flag raising with impressive ceremonies 
took place at the Keyser car shop on May 11. 

Me I wee's Concert Band furnished the music. 
Addresses were made by the Rev. Wilt, the 
Rev. Martin, and the Rev. Ferryman. A 
feature of the occasion was a dove that was 
wrapped in the flag flying away as Old Glory 
was unfurled. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 



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The Keyser Baltimore and Ohio Baseball 
Club has elected the following officers for the 
season of 1917: manager, O. S. W. Fazenbaker; 
captain, C. E. Newkirk; field captain, "Dyke" 
Shaffer. All of these gentlemen are seasoned 
ball players and under their management 
Keyser should have an excellent team this 
year. It is probable (although the field is still 
open to all comers) that the following men will 
make the team: Montgomery, Farley, Fike, 
"Pop" Channel, "Cyclone" Hardy, G ruber, 
Louden, Slocum, Newkirk, "Dyke" Shaffer, 
Offutt and F. Golden. 

In a hotly contested game on May 26 the 
Keyser baseball team defeated Benwood 4 to 2. 
"Buck" Farley was on the slab for the victors. 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

Born to captain Samuel Rockwell and wife, 
a daughter. When joshed, captain "Sam" 
just grins. To engineer and Mrs. Marshall 
Devers, a daughter. The smile on the face of 
the jovial knight of the throttle grows wider. 

A. C. Butts has been promoted to the position 
of fireman of the motive power shop. He 
succeeds Mr. Grenoble, who has been trans- 
ferred to Cumberland. The shop boys unite 
in wishing Mr. Butts much success. 



On May 5 a large flag, purchased by the shop 
men, was raised over the machine shop. The 
weather was very cloudy and damp, so the 
exercises were held in the machine shop. 
Superintendent Brantner acted as master of 
ceremonies. Fireman Andrew Carney's fine 
band furnished the music for the occasion. 

After several selections by the band the large 
crowd, led by A. D. Darby, cashier of the Bank 
of Martinsburg, joined in singing "My Coimtry 
'Tis of Thee." 

Superintendent Brantner called upon W. L. 
Stephens, assistant machine shop foreman, to 
offer thanksgiving to God for his many blessings 
to us as a Nation. Mr. Brantner gave a short 
but splendid talk, appropriate to the occasion, 
and then introduced the speaker of the day, 
W. C. Montignani, secretary of the Cumberland 
Y. M. C. A. 

Mr. Montignani is always a peerless enter- 
tainer, but he never appeared to better advant- 
age than on this occasion. His remarks were 
timely and to the point and were well received 
by the large audience. After the speaking, the 
flag was raised, the band playing the "Star 
Spangled Banner" and the crowd cheering. 

The railroad men of this Division were 
shocked at the untimely death of brakeman 
John P. Widmeyer, who lost his life while at 
work in the Cumbo yards. The accident 
occurred at night, and was not witnessed by 
any of the unfortunate man's fellow workers. 
Just how it occurred is unknown. Mr. Wid- 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



02 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



meyer was twenty-nine years of age and had 
been in the employ of the Baltimore and Ohio 
for almost six years. His widow and two 
small children survive. The funeral took 
place from his home and was attended by his 
fellow railroad men and a large number of 
intimate friends. 

Paul Werking, a well known employe, recently 
died in the City Hospital. His widow and 
four children survive. Mr. Werking, who was 
forty-one years old, was a member of the 
B. of R. T. The remains were taken to his 
home in Brunswick, where the funeral srevices 
were held. 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 
E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

R. F. Haney, Conductor, Weston 
C. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. M. Scott Chairman, Superintendent, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Grafton, W. Va. 

W. I. Rowland Road Foreman, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

H. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Dr. C. A. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton, W. Va. 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont, W. Va. 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

R. L. Schill Agent, Weston, W. Va. 

E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon, W. Va. 

F. W. Tutt Secretary, Chief Clerk to Division 

Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

L. W. Grapes Fireman, Fairmont, W. Va. 

D. R. Ridenour Machinist, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. Pickens Brakeman, Grafton, W. Va. 

A. L. Lunsford Engineer, Weston, W. Va. 

G. W. Binnix Car Inspector, Fairmont, W. Va. 

J. W. Hostler Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

W. P. Kincaid Locomotive Inspector, Fairmont, W. Va. 



It was a terrible shock to the men of the 
Monongah Division to hear of the deaths of 
trainmaster E. D. Griffin, Silas W. White, cook, 
John C. Posten, wreckman, and Ray Vincent, 
lineman, in the accident that occurred near 




JOHN P. WIDMEYER 




THE LATE E. D. GRIFFIN 



Cove Run on May 10. The whole division has 
been plunged into deep sorrow by the death of 
these employes. 

r Edward D. Griffin, trainmaster of the Monon- 
gah Division, was born at Deer Park, Md., on 
May 2, 1872. He entered our service as a 
messenger boy at the age of nine years and 
displayed such remarkable ability that when 
only eighteen he was made a train dispatcher. 

Mr. Griffin was a prominent man in railroad 
circles, and the Company and its employes 
sustain a distinct loss in his sad death. He 
was considered one of the ablest men who ever 
held the position of trainmaster and was one 
of the rising men of the Baltimore and Ohio 
System. Had he lived he would have gone 
much higher in the service of our great Com- 
pany. 

His life was an inspiration to all who knew 
him. Courteous and kind to his co-workers, he 
won the love and respect of a host of friends, 
who sincerely mourn his untimely death. 

Mr. Griffin is survived by two sisters, Mrs. 
Bridget Garrett and Miss Josie Griffin, of Deer 
Park, Md., and two brothers, William B. 
Griffin, of Deer Park and John Griffin of Elkins, 
W. Va. 

The funeral services were held in St. Peter's 
Catholic Church, Oakland, Md., at 9.30 Mon- 
day morning, May 14. A high mass of requiem 
was celebrated by Father Council, assisted by 
Father McElliott, of Grafton. 

The active pall bearers were all close friends 
of the deceased A. P. Lavelle, J. T. Dorsey, 
James McClung, W. \\. Cruise, W. I. Rowland 
and II. I). Comerford. 

The honorary pall bearers were: J. F. Keegan, 

general superintendent; J. M. Scott, superin- 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 



tendent; H. Wilson, assistant superintendent at 
Grafton; R. A. Grammes, assistant superin- 
tendent of the Baltimore Division; F. C. Moran, 
trainmaster, Parkersburg; B. Z. Holverstott, 
M. R. district trainmaster; J. P. Dorsey, 
trainmaster, Newark Division; E. Bartlett, 
assistant trainmaster, Monongah Division; 
T. K. Faherty, superintendent motive power, 
Wheeling; J. A. Anderson, master mechanic, 
Grafton; M. E. Cartright, general yardmaster, 
Grafton; B. Nuzum, general yardmaster, 
Fairmont; W. T. Hopke, master carpenter; 
M. J. Tighe, assistant road foreman of engines; 
P. Judge, superintendent transportation; F. E. 
Fuqua, division operator; E. L. Welshonce, 
trainmaster, Cumberland; M. A. Carney, road 
foreman of engines, Cumberland; R. A. Murphy, 
dispatcher, Wheeling; William Clarke, repre- 
senting the shop force; T. W. Murray, repre- 
senting the O. R. C; J. W. Brown, representing 
the B. of L. E. ; E. W. Coffman, representing the 
B. of R. T.; and T. J. Davidson, representing 
the B. of L. F. 

Our employes at Weston held a flag raising 
at the shops on the afternoon of April 13. 
Although the affair was arranged on short 
notice patriotism and enthusiasm were not 
lacking and over five hundred people were in 
attendance. To Miss Madge Hinzman, the 
only lady employe of the shops, was given the 
honor of pulling the cord that freed "Old Glory" 
to the breeze. At the same moment the flag 
was saluted by blasts from every whistle in the 
shops and yards. 

G. A. Shaffer, master mechanic at the shops, 
was master of ceremonies. Other speakers 
were the Rev. John Beddow, the Rev. P. A. 
Isner, the Rev. E. E. White, the Rev. E. S. 
Brooks, Prof. Edward C. Smith and Mr. Frank 
M. Keane. The music was furnished by the 
band of the Modern Woodmen of America. 
The railroad men received many congratula- 
tions on the splendid spirit in evidence at the 
flag raising. 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondents 
M. J. Sauter, Office of Superintendent 
D. F. Allread, Agent, Reader, W. Va. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. M. Haver Chairman, Superintendent 

E. H. B^rnhart Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

W. F. Ross Road Foreman of Engines 





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We cordially invite all employes to inspect 
carefully the advertising now appearing in 
our Magazine. It is our purpose to offer 
only such things as will legitimately appeal 
to the rank and file of our readers. All 
advertising will be rigidly examined before 
insertion so that there may be no question 
about its standard. No objectionable adver- 
tising will be accepted :: :: :: :: 

ADVERTISING RATES 
$35.00 per page, each insertion and pro rata 
for halves, quarters and eighths and $2.19 per 
inch (fourteen agate lines to an inch, one- 
sixteenth page). Width of column, 16 ems 
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Rates for covers, extra colors and preferred 
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For further particulars address 

Robert M. Van Sant, Advertising Manager 
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FLACi RAISING AT WESTON 

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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



\V. Beverly Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Gabbeb Car Foreman 

R. A. Nease Machinist Helper 

W. C. Wright Supervisor 

J. Thonen Engineer 

E. L. Parker Freight Conductor 

L. C. Bo.mer Freight Conductor 

B. Huff Machinist 

J. E. Holler Freight Fireman 



The Wheeling Athletic Association is making 
rapid progress in converting the fourth floor of 
the Wheeling passenger station into a first- 
class gymnasium for the use of its members. 

L. K. Landau, our genial M. of W. material 
clerk, has left for Tulsa, Okla., where he will 
engage in the oil supply business. Mr. Landau 
was secretary of the Athletic Association, 
and his many friends wish him success. 

The following appointments have been made 
in the division accountant's office at Wheeling: 

E. J. Dusch, material clerk; A. J. Sonnefelt, 
M. of W. timekeeper; Frank Eberly, C. T. 
timekeeper's clerk; C. A. Connors, timekeeper; 

F. Boyd, assistant distribution clerk and A. J. 
Bradford, fuel clerk. 

The woman crossing watchman force on the 
Wheeling Division is steadily increasing. 
There are now six women on duty in that 
capacity at Wheeling. 

C. M. Criswell has been appointed coal 
billing agent at Benwood Junction. 

Miss Gladys Corry and Curtis Glaspell, both 
of Folsom, W. Va., were married May 10. 
Congratulations. Mr. Glaspell is our supply 
man at Hartzel, W. Va. 

The nation-wide campaign to get everyone 
to cultivate a garden is showing favorable 
results on the Wheeling Division. Much 
acreage which has heretofore been neglected 
has been placed under cultivation. 

George Stein, formerly clerk to the road 
foreman at Benwood, has been promoted to 
night roundhouse foreman. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 

E. L. Sobreia, Office of Superintendent 
\i. E. Babnhabt, Office of Superintendent 
W. B; Kennedy; Office of Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

J W ROOT Chairman, Superintendent 

C. E, Mkya.n Division Engineer 

J Kelly Master Mechanic 

B.C. Moras Trainmaster 

E. I. LuroHum Road Foreman of Engines 

Dl A I. BoMYNH Medical Examiner 

\\ E Ksnjodi Division Claim Agent 

E. Cmwmsn Captain of Police 

1 \ Caotnteb .Agent, Parkeraburg 

R E Babnhabi Agent- Yardmaater, Huntington 

II. I < Nrgtti Secretary 




CHARLES W. PARSONS 



Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

B. O'Connor Engineer 

W. Boyles Fireman 

T. C. Hogan Conductor 

L. H. Tracy Brakeman 

J. L. Davis Car Department 

J. R. Fowler Locomotive Department 

L. A. Costello Stores Department 

The accompanying picture is of Charles W. 
Parsons. He was born on February 1, 1865, 
and entered the service of our Company on 
December 1, 1887, as a trackman at Millwood. 
He was promoted to his present position, that 
of carpenter foreman, on May 1, 1891. 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, F. P. Neu, Secretary to 
Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

II. B. Green Superintendent 

F. P. Neu Secretary 

J. J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

F. W. Rhuark Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. II- Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

R. D. Sykes Medical Examiner 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. Tuttle Division Operator 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

E. J. Ckampton Agent, Elyria 

R. BLTTHI Operator, Canton 

( '. 10. Biechler Section Foreman, Sterling 

J, T. Sidaway Carpenter, Massillon 

W. E. Butts Conductor, Lorain 

A. H. Sheffield Engineer, Lorain 

W.B. Bhocxcob Engineer, Cleveland 

A. L. Ruth Conductor, Akron 

P. J. Ririoha Conductor, Cleveland 

J. LOBUB Car I nspoetor, Cleveland 

J. Lewis Pipe Shop Foreman, Lorain 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



65 



The accompanying picture is of our Cleveland 
stationmaster, E. F. Keffer, "By Dad." The 
satisfied smile displayed is the one with which 
he always greets our patrons, as well as his fel- 
low employes. 

Dr. R. D. Sykes, who was medical examiner 
at Cleveland, has been appointed assistant 
chief medical examiner, with headquarters at 
Baltimore. The very best wishes of the 
Cleveland Division employes go with the 
doctor to his new position. To succeed him 
at Cleveland we have Dr. A. A. Church, who 
we are most pleased to have back with us. 

We were glad to hear that E. J. Cline, agent 
at Erhart, O., now has an assistant to help him 
along at his station. The newly arrived is a 
nine and one-half pound baby boy. 

Effective May 10 J. G. Collinson was ap- 
pointed assistant division engineer at Cleveland, 
vice N. S. Pendleton, transferred. 

Effective May 8 W. E. Johnson /was appointed 
yardmaster at Dover, O., vice J. C. Shields, 
assigned to other duties. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F." Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark, O. 

C. H. Titus Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

T. J. Daly Assistant Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

J. Tordella Division Engineer, Newark, O. 

Wm. Streck Road Foreman, Newark, O. 

W. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Newark, O. 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent,, Newark, O. 





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Air Brake Inspector 

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One of the finest of the many flag raising 
ceremonies that have taken place all over the 
System was held in Zanesville on the afternoon 
of Sunday, April 29. 

An imposing parade, in which the military 
was the dominant note, preceded the ceremony. 
Grand Marshal C. A. Barton, with his aides, 



O EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 

headed the procession, followed by the band of 
the Seventh Regiment, Ohio National Guard, 
Companies A and E and the Hospital Corps of 
that regiment. Then came the representatives 
of all the prominent fraternal societies, Boy 
Scouts, the employes of Zanesville business 
houses, clubs, Newark Division officials and 
employes and the employes of other railroads 
entering Zanesville. There were about 4,000 
in line and it is estimated that at least 12,000 
witnessed the parade and the flag raising 
ceremonies. 

An eighty foot staff had been erected on the 
grass plot opposite our passenger station and 




TWELVE THOUSAND PEOPLE ATTENDED THE FLAG RAISING CEREMONY AT ZANESVILLE 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



G7 



near it a platform built for the speakers. 
Around this the large crowd gathered. The 
program was as follows: 

Invocation, the Rev. W. L. Whallon; song, 
"America," lead by a chorus of girls and 
accompanied by the massed bands— the 
crowd was invited to join in the singing; address 
by Judge A. A. Frazier, general counsel of the 
Company; address by superintendent Stevens, 
of the Newark Division; unfurling of the flag 
by Master Richard Baldwin. 

Judge Frazier emphasized the fact that the 
thrill of patriotism or reverence for the Ameri- 
can flag is not derived from its colors or the 
texture of the fabric, but from what the flag- 
represents. He spoke of the struggles through 
which the nation has passed and the difficulties 
encountered to keep the greatest democracy 
on earth equal to the demands on it. He 
then reviewed the various steps leading up to 
the present world crisis in which America has 
become an entrant and predicted that the 
American people would not be found wanting 
in the struggle between democracy and autoc- 
racy — between tr.e overnment which derives 
its power to govern from the consent of the 
governed, and that which dictates through 
assumed authority to the governed. 

Superintendent Stevens commented on the 
spectacle of seeing one hundred and fifty 
Rumanians assembled near the speakers' 
stand. They were carrying a banner signi- 
fying their unity with America and thankfulness 
for American freedom. "That banner and 
that body of men," said superintendent Stevens, 
"are the most beautiful things I have seen in 
Zanesville today and emphasize the beneficence 
of welcoming the peoples of Europe to the 
American freedom." 

Superintendent Stevens then spoke of the 
railroader's and the railroads' part in the war. 
He drew the conclusion that, no matter whether 
men were engaged in agricultural preparedness, 
in work or transportation for the benefit of the 
government, in munition plants or in the 
trenches at the front, they were each entitled 
to credit for their endeavors — one as essential 
as the other. 

At the conclusion of the speaking, Master 
Richard Baldwin pulled the rope that unfurled 
the beautiful American flag at the top of an 
eighty foot flag staff. There was an outburst 
of cheering and a volley of shots in salute from 
the soldier boys and the ceremonies were 
concluded. 

Newark Shops 

On the afternoon of April 21 an elaborate flag 
raising ceremony was held at Newark shops, 
under the auspices of the shop employes. 

A parade, consisting of the Home Company 
of Old Guards in their uniforms of '61, the 
Buckeye Band of this city, six hundred Balti- 
more and Ohio employes, a number of young 
ladies dressed in the national colors and several 
beautifully decorated automobiles carrying the 
committee on arrangements and the speakers, 



started from the Auditorium Building, on the 
public square, and proceeded to the shops. 

About two thousand people gathered aroimd 
the platform which had been built near the 
erecting shop. Superintendent of shops Cooper, 
acting as master of ceremonies, gave a short 
talk in which he emphasized the need of loyalty 
in the present crisis. He then introduced 
superintendent Stevens, who dwelt principally 
on the railroad man's duty in war times, show- 
ing that railroad men were in the national 
service as much as are soldiers and that it was 
most important that the railroads should keep 
a steady stream of supplies and munitions 
flowing to the troops in the field. His address 
was received with cheers. 

Next came the flag raising, for which Mr. 
Tagg, engineer in charge of the power plant, 
had devised a novel scheme. A large paper 
box was hoisted to the top of the eighty-five 
foot staff and at a given signal was opened, 
releasing four pigeons, a quantity of confetti 
and the flag. At the same moment four other 
flags were raised over different shops within 
sight of the crowd and the Old Guard fired a 
salute. 

Attorney Charles Montgomery, one of the 
leading lawyers of Newark, spoke on "Patriot- 
ism," and Mr. Ray Martin, another well known 
attorney, on "Our Flag." The program was 
concluded by the singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

The affair was a great success in every way 
and the local papers devoted much space to 
a description of the ceremonies. Credit is 
due the committee in charge, consisting of 
machine shop foreman C. A. Card, boiler fore- 
man E. H. Ritter, erecting shop foreman W. L. 
Clugston and tin and pipe shop foreman William 
Browning, with the assistance of superintendent 
of shops Cooper. 

Our genial foundry clerk, Charles Haslop, is 
beaming with joy. There's a reason. Yes, its 
a boy. Mother and son are doing nicely. 

A number of the employes interested in 
baseball recently met in the superintendent 
of shops' office and arranged for organizing 
their ball club for the season. A. E. Roll, of 
the superintendent's office force, was made 
manager of the team. Quite an array of talent 
is available and the prospects are excellent for 
a strong playing team and one that will show 
the way to its opponents. Newark leads in a 
great many things on the System and we 
would not be surprised (nor adverse to seeing) 
baseball added to the list during the present 
summer. 

Miss Eva Diment has taken the position of 
stenographer to chief piecework inspector. 
Her predecessor, Raymond Allison, was pro- 
moted to enginehouse clerk.. This is Miss 
Diment's first employment in the railroad 
business and we want to bid her welcome to 
the Baltimore and Ohio — the best of all rail- 
road systems. 



68 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




S. H. STEWART, Jr. 
Son of Yard Brakeman S. H. Stewart, of the 
Connellsville Division 



F. R. Ryan, machinist apprentice, and 
Miss Alice Riggs, a charming young Newark 
woman, were recently married. They spent 
their honeymoon in Cleveland, Ohio. "Bud" is 
mighty popular among his fellow workmen, 
and now that he is back at his post of duty 
he is kept busy shaking hands and accepting 
compliments and good wishes for a long and 
happy journey through life. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup't, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass't Sup't, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

If. H. Broughton Chairman, Superintendent 

CM. Stone Trainmaster 

T. E. Miller Master Mechanic 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner 

H. B. Pigman Division Operator 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

H. D. Whip Relief Agent 

C. A. Albright Agent 

E. E. McDonald Agent 

W. F. Herwick Conductor 

W. J. Dayron Road Brakeman 

O. E. Newcomer Fireman 

W. H. Metzoar Supervisor 

E. C. Lucas Car Foreman 

A. L. Fhiel Shop Foreman 

H. E. Cochran Secretary 

J. L. Snyder, our veteran agent at Glencoe, 
Pa., fell and broke his right leg while getting 
out of a camp car at his station on May 12. 
fie was taken to the hospital at Cumberland, 
where it is reported he is doing nicely. 

Engineman Henry Albright, in addition to 
Upholding his reputation as a violin player 
and checkers expert, still finds time to farm 
three city lots. Seems like a lot for one man 

to undertake but -leave it to "Hen." 

C. E. Buttermore, assistant chief chirk to the 
superintendent, died on May .5 after an illness 
of one week. Pneumonia was the cause. His 



death cast a pall of sadness over division 
headquarters, as Mr. Buttermore was held in 
high esteem by all with whom he came in con- 
tact. Entering the service of the Company in 
1905, he was employed as a stenographer in 
various departments until 1911, when he was 
appointed to the position he held at the time of 
his death. He is survived by a wife and 
daughter. P. A. Jones has been appointed 
successor to Mr. Buttermore. 

The lad in the toy Ford is S. H. Stewart, Jr., 
son of S. H. Stewart, yard brakeman at Con- 
nellsville. 

The young lady riding the donkey is Myrtle 
Louise De Huff, the daughter of S. M. De Huff, 
our correspondent. 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Murray, Office of Sup't, Pittsburgh 
B. J. McQuade. Office of Sup't, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 

T. J. Brady Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

W. J. Kennedy Secretary 

C. C. Cook Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

E. J. Brennan Superintendent of Shops 

F. P. Pfahler Master Mechanic 

A. J. Weise General Car Foreman 

F. Bryne Claim Agent 

W. F. Deneke Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

R. F. Langdon Brakeman 

E. D. McCaughey Fireman 

E. P. Chenowith Conductor 

J. J. Berry Foreman, Glenwood 

J. L. Soliday Engineer 




MYRTLE LOUISE DnHUFF 
The dnughterof S. M. DellufT 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



no 



An examination of the accounts and station 
building at Mars, on May 2, developed a very- 
satisfactory condition. Superintendent Brady 
has written to agent O. C. Pinkerton, congratu- 
lating him. 

An examination of accounts at Etna, Pa., on 
May 3, developed a very satisfactory condition, 
due to the interest which the cashier, Miss 
Kate Beck, has taken in handling them. Super- 
intendent Brady has written to her, expressing 
the Company's appreciation. 

On May 19 a flag raising took place at Willow 
Grove. The ceremony was attended by about 
five hundred people, including school children. 
Patriotic music was furnished by a band. An 
hour later a beautiful flag, made by Mrs. 
Arnold, wife of yardmaster Arnold, was raised 
just across the river at 36th Street. The 
speakers were as follows: chairman, Mr. Arnold; 
toastmaster, F. G. Hoskins, assistant superin- 
tendent; T. J. Brady, superintendent; John 
Beltz, trainmaster; Edward Ross, engineer; 
John W. Collins, fireman, who spoke on ' 'Win- 
ning the war with railroads, and the burden of 
President Willard," and also spoke of his 
experiences in the Cuban and Philippine 
campaigns. He served two enlistments in 
the regular Army and is a member of the 
United Spanish War Veterans. This was 
Mr. Collins' sixteenth flag raising activity since 
a state of war has existed between our country 
and Germany, and his fourth flag raising on the 
Pittsburgh Division. 



Happenings in Pittsburgh Yard 

Maurice Lehmer, our popular passenger 
conductor, made a flying trip to Youngstown, 
Ohio, and remember, he is a bachelor, too! 
Maybe something doin' — can't never tell. 

"Mollie" Tompkins, a brakeman on the third 
trick passenger crew, would certainly be out of 
luck if he did not have two things with him all 
the time — his famous smile and his corn cob 
pipe. 

William Parfitt was sadly missed from the 
1944 for a few days. She is some fancy engine, 
"Bill" says. 

Charles Richardson is off on the relief. 
Charles says that he isn't as young as he was 
sixty some years ago. 

Anybody seen "Bill" Heiser? The fellows 
were wondering what he and "Fritchy" were 
running up through "B" yard for the other day. 
They promised to tell us some day, but not 
now. 

We are all wondering how "Teddy" Glenn 
got along the other night after he lost that 
Missouri meersham. 

Why is it that "Ed" Werreg and John Collins 
always have their heads together on the right 
side? That side is always passing the car 
cleaners. There must be a reason. 



The Real Estate Educator 

By F. M. PAYNE 

A book for hustling Real Estate "Boost- 
ers," Promoters, Town Builders, and every- 
one who owns, sells, rents or leases real 
estate of any kind. 

Containing inside information not generally known, 
"Don'ts in Real Estate," "Pointeis." Specific Legal 
Forms, For Sale, Exchange, Building and Surety- 
ship Contracts, Bonds, Mortgages, Powers of At- 
torney, Leases, Landlords' Agreements, Notice to 
Quit, Deeds, Chattel Mortgages, etc. It gives, in 
the most condensed form, the essential Knowledge 
of the Real Estate Business. 

Apart from the agent, operator or contractor, there 
is much to be found in its contents that will prove 
of great value to all who wish to be posted on 
Valuation, Contracts, Mortgages, Leases, Evictions, 
etc. The cost might be saved five hundred timei 
over in one transaction. 

Cloth. 256 Pages. Price $1.00 Postpaid 
Baltimore and Ohio 




WHY NOT TRY 

TRAPSH00TING? 

Give this sport the " once-over." 
There's always a welcome at gun clubs 
for visitors. 

If there's no gun club convenient, you'll 
find the DU PONT HAND TRAP a prac- 
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apparatus at trapshooting clubs. 
Trapshooting is an every-day-in-the-year 
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70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Glenwood Shops 

Correspondent, Frank Rush 

On April 26 we hold a flag raising at Glen- 
wood. Credit certainly is duo the committee- 
men, Messrs. Bogardus, White and Holland for 
the part they took in getting the program so 
well arranged and properly handled. Credit 
is also due "Bob" Jamison and his men for 
putting up the staff for us. It is said that ours 
was the best flag raising ceremony to be held 
by any concern in Pittsburgh, so far. Moving 
pictures were shown of the parade and raising of 
the flag at the Meca Theatre, Hazelwood. 
The program follows: 

Master of ceremonies, John Picket; opening 
prayer, the Rev. C. A. Boory; song "America," 
by school children, accompanied by band and 
Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club; presentation of 
flag, by District Attorney R. H. Jackson; 
patriotic speech, the Hon. J. B. Drew; music, 
by band; address, M. H. Cahill, general 
superintendent; raising of flag, by the Color 
Guards; singing of the "Star Spangled Banner" 
by the Baltimore and Ohio Glee Club and 
audience; National salute, by an ex-soldier; 
benediction, by Father Devlin. 

The Glenwood Athletic Association is not 
developing as fast as it should. The young 
men about the shops are not taking the proper 
interest in it. Let's all get together and make 
this a success. Why should we, at Glenwood, 
allow ourselves to be back numbers in a thing 
like this? A little assistance from both young 
and old employes on the Pittsburgh Division 
will no doubt make this association a success. 
Here's hoping that all meetings from now on 
will be better attended by the employes than 
has been the case in the past. 

The Glee Club held its regular meeting on 
May 24, with about thirty members present. 
Mr. Twigger, our noted tenor, has joined the 
Engineering Company, and this, he expected, 
would be his last meeting with us for some time. 
We will miss him very much, but then how can 
the Army get along without a "twigger." 

We will also miss E. J. Brennan from our 
regular meetings, as his new job will keep him 




BALTIMORE AND OHIO MEN WHO HAVE 
SERVED THEIR COUNTRY TOOK 
PART- IN THE PARADE 

Photo by Dr. C. H. Wilson 

out of the city a great deal. But our new super- 
intendent of shops at Glenwood, R. B. Stout, 
when taking up his other duties at this station, 
will also be called upon to look after the Club, 
just the Sjame as Mr. Brennan. Mr. Perry pre- 
sented the Club with a new piece of music en- 
titled "The Sunshine of Your Smile," which 
was very kind and thoughtful of him. We shall 
be glad to sing it for him in the near future. 

Overheard at the Hazelwood station, Friday 
morning, May 4, 7.35 a. m. 

Friend — "Were you down at the Glee Club 
last night?" 

Second Friend — "No, I wish I had been." 

First Friend — "Well, I was working overtime 
and heard them at practice and I tell you they 
can sing." 

The Glee Club meeting night has been 
changed from Thursday to Tuesday, for the 
benefit of some who could not meet on Thursday. 
If you want to spend a pleasant evening, come up. 
We will be glad to see you. 

The Club wishes to thank the committee and 
all our boys for the way they supported the 
Glee Club dance. It was our first one and 
shows what can be done when good fellows get 
together with the right spirit for the right 
cause. It was a bad evening, but a good night. 



Tin; _F LAG RAISING AT PITTSBURGH ROUNDHOUSE 

Photo by Dr. ('. II. Wilson 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



We were all sorry to hear of the death of the 
wife of engineer McFall. Mr. McFall and his 
family have our heartfelt sympathy. 

We were glad to hear of the appointment of 
C. T. Early as assistant boilermaker foreman 
at Glenwood. 

Born on March 26, a baby girl to Mr. and Mrs. 
Daniel Wible. Congratulations ! 

It was with great pleasure that we heard 
that our former superintendent of shops, E. J. 
Bremian, had been appointed general master 
mechanic. 

A. L. Brown has been appointed master 
mechanic at Glenwood, vice F. P. Pfahler, 
transferred to Cumberland as master mechanic. 

E. R. Schneider has been promoted to general 
roundhouse foreman at Glenwood. We wish 
him success in his new position. 

The Glenwood Shop baseball team is now 
well organized and there is no doubt but that 
they will cut some figure in the competition for 
the championship. Mr. Gisbert has been ap- 
pointed manager and "Andy" Bennett captain. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondent, J. A. Lloyd, Chief Clerk 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. W. Van Horn' Chairman, Superintendent 

CP. Angell Trainmaster 

D. \V. Cronin Division Engineer 

J. J. McGuire Master Mechanic 

T. K. Faherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Dr. F. Dorset Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne. .-. Division Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill Division Operator 

W. Damron Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

E. F. Toepfer Road Engineer 

G. T. Griffith Road Fireman 

H. A. Bradley Road Conductor 

S. K. Fielding Yard Engineer 

L. Whalen Pipefitter 

J. W. Ferron Work Checker, Car Department 



Our officials and employes joined in an 
inspiring display of patriotism at New Castle 
Junction, on the afternoon of May 9, when a 
beautiful 8 by 12 foot flag was raised to the 
top of a 110 foot staff, equipped with electric 
light for night-lighting. 



Movie of a Man Arising from a Pullman Berth - -bvbriggs 




Courtesy of New York Tribune 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



A large crowd of employes, officials and 
interested friends attended, a special train 
being run from the city for their accommo- 
dation. 

The large platform about the flag-staff 
stands midway between the offices and the 
shops. A number of men from Troop F, carry- 
ing their guidon, preceded the party of spec- 
tators, and took their places in front of the 
speakers' stand, while the Croton School 
Drum Corps played. A number of cars stood 
on the tracks nearby and these were lined with 
men from the shops, who had been granted a 
half holiday. The space surrounding the 
platform was filled with the crowd, which 
remained until the close of the program. 

John F. Woods had charge of the ceremonies, 
and introduced the speakers. After the invo- 
cation by the Rev. C. S. Joshua, attorney 
George W. Muse made the opening address, 
urging his hearers to stand by their country in 
its hour of need. Mrs. W. W. Clendenin, 
"Mother of the Red Cross in Lawrence 
County," then spoke briefly, explaining the 
meaning of the three flags she waved, the 
Stars and Stripes, the British flag and the 
French tri-color. 

Mayor A. D. Newell also spoke briefly, and 
attorney C. W. Fenton urged upon his hearers 
the importance of each one doing his duty, 
whether in actual service in the army or navy 
or in the production and conservation of food 
supplies. 

The drum corps then played another selec- 
tion, and the Rev. Joshua spoke briefly, after 
which the formal raising of the flag was carried 
out. The honor of raising the flag to the top 
of the big pole was accorded to engineer J. F. 
Johnson, the oldest employe on the division, 
who is a veteran of the Civil War, having 
enlisted at the age of fifteen. He raised the 
flag, still folded, to its place, then at the proper 
minute the cord attached to it was pulled and 
the beautiful flag waved in the breeze, while 
the crowd cheered, and a quartet from the 
shops led in the singing of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

Ihe saluting volley was then fired by Troop 
F men, and as they finished the salute was 
taken up by every engine in the vicinity. 

Attorney Muse, a Spanish-American war 
veteran, said that he had attended many 
flag-raisings, but that this was the first one 
that he had seen conducted in strict accord- 
ance with military regulations. 

The committee on the unfurling of the flag 
was composed of F. D. Ablett, Harry Reese 
and "Jack" Moran, and tlx; general committee 

in charge of the day was composed of F. D. 
Ablett, W. 1\ Cahill and John Warnock. 

The Baltimore and Ohio officials here have 
received word from the general offices instruct- 
ing them to form t heir own Red ( toss organiza- 
tion. Nearly all the men are already members, 
and the office girls sent word yesterday that 
t liev will join in a body. 

'I r hc employes of every department con- 
tributed to the fund for purchasing the flag 



and every department was represented at the 
ceremonies. 

The management of the New Castle Division 
wants to express its thanks to all those who had 
charge of and perfected the arrangements. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, P. G. Ervin, Assistant 
Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. H. Jackson Superintendent, Chairman, Garrett, Ind. 

T. J. Rogers. . . .Trainmaster, Vice-Chairman, Garrett, Ind. 
T. E. Jamison Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

R. R. Jenkins Secretary Y. M. C. A., Chicago Jet., O. 

Dr. C. V/. Hedrick. . . . .Medical Examiner, Chicago Jet., O. 

Dr. F. Dorse y Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

T. E. Spurrier Claim Agent, Tiffin, O. 

John Draper Agent, Chicago, 111. 

F. W. Paden Agent, North Baltimore, O. 

S. T. Leek Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

A. Dreibelbis Fireman, Garrett, Ind. 

J. C. Williams Conductor, Garrett, Ind. 

F. A. Kern Brakeman, Garrett, Ind. 

E. R. Bishop Yard Brakeman, Chicago Jet., O. 

H. H. Vanderbosch Machinist, Garrett, Ind. 

R. Kingsbury Wheel Checker, Car Dept., Garrett, Ind. 

C. W. Carpenter Boilermaker, Chicago Jet., O. 

Wm. Shultz Pipefitter, South Chicago, 111. 



The accompanying picture is of six Garrett 
young men who have enlisted in the Coast 
Artillery Corps of the Army and are now 
stationed on the coast of Maine. Reading 
from left to right they are: Edgar Beeber, a 
son of conductor Beeber; Herbert Wilcox, 
former crew caller; John Hopper, messenger in 
the office of the division accountant and a son 
of boiler inspector Charles Hopper; Carl Sliger 
and Paul Stewart, Garrett High School boys, 
and Daniel Farmer, a son of engineer Daniel 
Farmer. 

Garrett has already furnished a large number 
of young men for service in the Army and Navy 
and doubtless will furnish a good many more. 
All the boys in the picture are members of well 
known and highly respected Garrett families. 




GARRETT BOYS W IK) H A V E ANSWERED 
Till': CALL TO THE COLORS 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 




F. M. THORNTON AND HIS BROTHER 



The accompanying picture is of operator 
F. M. Thornton (seated) and his brother 
(standing). Mr. Thornton has been in the 
service for the last thirteen years and is one 
of our wideawake and alert operators. Since 
January, 1916, he has had five entries of com- 
mendation placed on his record, which shows 
that he is not only working to earn his salary, 
but also working in the interest of "Safety 
First." 

W. C. Guthrie, for the last few years chief 
clerk to the storekeeper at Garrett, has been 
transferred to the position of storekeeper at 
New Castle Junction, Pa. He is succeeded at 
Garrett by William Hathaway. We wish them 
both success in their new positions. 

Effective May 1 R. J. Myers was appointed 
night ticket agent at Fostoria, Ohio, vice 
F. S. France, resigned to accept a position with 
another railroad. 

H. G. Hursh, for the last year stenographer 
to the division engineer at this point, has 
been transferred to the same position at Pitts- 
burgh, Pa. We wish him success. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

Yard clerk Leonard G. Randall, whose 
picture appears on this page, is a member of 
Company K, First Infantry, Illinois National 
Guard. 

Switchman James Brennan has enlisted in 
the U. S. Marine Corps, and has been sent to 
the Marine Barracks at Port Royal, S. C, 
where he will remain for instruction for three 
months and then be assigned to regular duty. 

Engineer W. S. Skinner, who was in the 
Navy for four years, left on April 8 for Boston, 
where he was assigned to duty on board a 
man-o-war. Others who have enlisted are 
inspector O'Brien and switchman Kist. 

J. M. Shay has been promoted from special 
foreman at Cincinnati to general foreman at 
South Chicago, vice C. W. Burke, resigned to 



become master mechanic of the Iroquois Iron 
Co., at South Chicago. 

Mr. Burke has been with us for twenty-five 
years and has the admiration of all his em- 
ployes, who regret to lose him but who extend 
a hearty welcome to Mr. Shay. 

Level foreman John Timm has left us after 
seventeen years of service. Edward Murphy 
succeeds him. 

Miss Clara Erickson has accepted a position 
as stenographer in storekeeper Kazmarek's 
office. 

This station has been equipped with up-to- 
date telephone service. Miss lone Sack is 
the switchboard operator. 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, R. G. Clark, Assistant 
Abstracter, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster 

CP. Palmer Division Engineer 

F. E. Lamphere Assistant Engineer 

Alex. Craw Division Claim Agent 

W. J. Wainman Captain of Police 

C. L. Hegley Examiner and Recorder 

H. McDonald Supervisor, Chicago Division 

Wm. Hogan Supervisor, Calumet Division 

F. K. Moses Master Mechanic 

F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines 

Chas. Esping Mastei Carpenter 

Dr. E. J. Hughes Medical Examiner 

C. O. Seifert Signal Supervisor 

Morris Altherr Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

J. O. Callahan General Car Foreman 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

O. E. Burger Engine Foreman, East Chicago, Ind. 

F. Foley Engine Foreman, Blue Island, 111. 

J. Wise Engine Foreman, Robey Street 

John Bickel Engineer, Robey Street 

M. J. McHugh Fireman*- Robey Street 

Thos. Kennedy Engineer, East Chicago, Ind. 

Fred Krause Fireman, East Chicago, Ind. 

H. J. Masse Machinist, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. E. Lowry Boilermaker, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. Bock Machinist, Robey Street 

D. W. Alderman Car Inspector, Robey Street 




7? 



I 

LEONARD G. RANDALL 



74 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The Roll of Honor 

Up to May 21 the following employes of the 
Terminal had enlisted for some branch of army 
service: G. W. Hesslau, T. F. Philbin, William 
Fitzgerald, James B. Pope, F. A. Betts, F. B. 
Fitzgibbons, L. O. Hall, William McVail, 
J. Sheets, Rufus Laulb and T. Miller. 

Let those of us who, for various reasons, are 
unable to enlist remember that we can do our 
bit at home by doing our work the best we 
know how, by becoming members of the Red 
Cross, by subscribing to the Liberty Loan, by 
avoiding waste and by backing our Government 
to the limit in whatever it may do. 

The entire Terminal joins us in wishing 
C. F. McKelvey, general yardmaster at Barr 
yard, a speedy recovery from the illness which 
has confined him to his home for the past two 
months. R. C. Ott is at present taking Mr. 
McKelvey's place. 

Harry Anderson has been made yardmaster 
at East Chicago. 

George Collatz, formerly chief yard clerk at 
Barr yard, is now firing a locomotive. 

The Chicago Terminal bowling team, repre- 
sented by L. H. Reinke and H. White, finished 
fifth in a field of 178 teams entered in the 
National Railway Bowling tournament. 

The Chicago Terminal is doing its bit toward 
assisting the Red Cross, over 916 memberships 
having been received up to May 21, and there 
are several lists still out. 

The Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul baseball 
team defeated the Chicago Terminal by a 
score of 2 to 1 in the opening game of the 
season of the Chicago Railway League, on 
May 19. The Chicago Terminal battery was 
Hanson and Mueller. 

The Chicago Terminal Athletic Association 
has become a life member of the American 
Red Cross, and all money formerly spent for 
amusement will be devoted to the work of the 
Red Cross. This is practical patriotism! 




MRS. EDWARD SUNDERLAND 

The accompanying picture is of Mrs. Edward 
Sunderland, who made the large flag now flying 
over the Lincoln Street terminals, which was 
raised, with appropriate ceremonies, on April 30. 

A concrete illustration of the way railroad em- 
ployes may do their bit for Uncle Sam was given 
by the Calumet Division on April 22, when a 
trainload of government horses was handled in 
record time. 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator 
C. D. Oflice : Chillicothe, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

A. A. Iams Chairman, Superintendent 

R. Mallen Road Foreman of Engines 

H. E. Greenwood Master Mechanic 

C. H. R. Howe Division Engineer 

T. E. Banks Trainmaster 

Dr. F. H. Weidemann Medical Examiner 

L. A. Patjsch Supervisor 

L. B. Manss Captain of Police 

L. Kedash Road Conductor 

C. Skinner Road Brakeman 

S. B. Frost Road Engineer 

L. W. Schaffer Road Fireman 

H. L. Shea Yard Fireman 

J. Shane. Machinist 

J. Rutherford. Tank Repairman 

S. Griffin Agent, Hillshoro 




SCHOOL CHILDREN MARCHING IN THE PARADE THAT PRECEDED THE FLAG RAISING 

AT CHILLICOTHE ON MAY 12 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 



On Saturday, May 12 ; the people of Chilli- 
cothe ate an early dinner and hastened over to 
Main Street to see the big patriotic parade, 
which preceded the Baltimore and Ohio flag 
raising at Union Station grounds. 

It was some parade and it moved to the 
station through throngs of cheering people, 
hundreds of school children, all carrying flags, 
in the van. At their head rode Colonel Richard 
Enderlin, a Civil War veteran, and W. B. Wood- 
row, the marshals. 

Following the school children came the 
Twentieth Century Band, heading the railroad 
boys, who marched ten abreast, with a flag at 
rest on their shoulders. Then came a platoon 
of Company H and then the Boy Scouts, march- 
ing like veterans. 

Baltimore and Ohio officials followed in 
automobiles, superintendent lams, assistant 
superintendent G. S. Cameron and ex-Senator 
Dick, one of the speakers of the day, occupying 
the leading machine. 

In the meantime the boys at the shops had 
not been idle. A steel pole, fifty feet high and 
painted white, had been erected on a concrete 
foundation in the center of the lawn. The 
carpenters were busy all morning putting up a 
platform near the flag pole and had it all fussed 
up with red, white and blue bunting and more 
flags. The parade wound around in circular 
formation until the lawn was crowded and pre- 
sented a riot of color. The band played patri- 
otic airs while waiting for the speakers and 
officials to mount the platform and start the 
program. A cold wind blew out of the north- 
west and the sky was over cast, making heavy 
wraps necessary for comfort, but this did not 
dampen the ardor or spirit of the crowd, as 
evidenced by their patriotism and good nature 
in cheering the speakers, cheering the band and 
then giving three rousing cheers for the Balti- 
more and Ohio shopmen, who were responsible 
for the event. Railroad men and their families 



predominated and it was a great and happy 
gathering. 

After an invocation by the Rev. D. L. Moritz, 
our division operator, G. W. Plumly, who was 
master of ceremonies and chairman of the day, 
delivered the opening address. He then intro- 
duced Ex-Senator W. L. Dick, Baltimore and 
Ohio fuel inspector, as the first speaker. 

Dr.W. S. Hoy, of Wellston, State Representa- 
tive, was the last speaker, and made an eloquent 
appeal for allegiance to the flag. He called 
to the platform W. S. Richards, past com- 
mander of the E. U. Weidler Camp, United 
States Spanish War Veterans and a survivor 
of the ill-fated battleship Maine. To Mr. 
Richards was given the honor of raising the 
flag and as the school children, led by the band 
and the male chorus, sang "The Star Spangled 
Banner," the big ten by twenty flag began to 
mount the staff. 

Rev. J. A. Laughbaum, of Calvary Lutheran 
Church, pronounced the benediction and the 
crowd scattered. In spite of the inclement 
weather conditions, the whole affair was success- 
fully carried out, thanks to the untiring efforts 
of the boys from the shops and to those other 
employes who contributed toward the expense of 
buying the flag and hiring the band and to the 
cooperation of our local railroad officials, which 
was given cheerfully and whole-heartedly. 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

K. B. White Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

S. U. Hooper Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. Prukhiser Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. R. Gibson Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Quigley Master Mechanic, Seymour, Ind. 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 




THE FLAG RAISING AT CHILLICOTHE, ON MAY 12 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. Horan General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massmann Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky. 

J. E. O'Dom Special Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

Rotating Members 

L. N. Simmons Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

A. Beck Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

Lon Durham Passenger Engineer, Louisville, Ky. 

C. W. Kline Track Foreman, Osgood, Ind. 



Effective May 17, a ticket agency was opened 
at St. Bernard, Ohio. A. M. Cosby, freight 
agent at that point, will now be in charge of 
both freight and passenger business. 

The employes of the Seymour roundhouse 
thank S. A. Rogers for his gift of a large Ameri- 
can flag, which now floats from a staff on the 
water tower. 

The sand tower recently erected by the 
M. of W. Department at Seymour roundhouse 
is much appreciated by the employes there. 

The 1917 baseball team is now being organ- 
ized, and the employes feel that before the 
season closes it will show the other divisions 
something about the fine art of baseball 
playing. 

Superheated freight engine 2772, recently 
transferred to this division, has been assigned 
to engineer Walter Darling and fireman Ross 
Hinkle. Both gentlemen are wearing broad 
smiles, caused by their success in hauling 
tonnage. 

The Seymour Bachelor Club, composed 
principally of Baltimore and Ohio employes, 
gave a "delightful" on April 2. 

We are sorry to lose our faithful day caller, 
Harry Reed, but congratulate him upon being 
promoted to train service. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, Joseph Beel, Transportation 
Department 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. L. Terrant Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

J. Weidenweber Secretary 

J. H. Meyers Trainmaster 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman of Engines 

L. A. Cordie Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. J. Larrick Car Foreman 

J. A. Tschuor General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers General Foreman 

T . M ahone y Supervisor 

Rotating Members 
E. R. Hottel Machinist 

H. W. Kirbert Engineer 

C. R. Doolittle Yardmaster 

G. Hurdle Inbound Foreman 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 

A. J. Heird Yardmaster 



That the employes at Storrs Shop are fully in 
accord with the spirit of patriotism that is 
sweeping over the country in these troublesome 
times was demonstrated on May 1 by an im- 
pressive flag raising. The large, beautiful 
American flag was carried by eight apprentice 
boys at the head of a parade composed of shop 
men, who, to the music of the buglers of the 
Third Regiment, marched to the speakers' 
stand. 

J. A. Tschuor, general foreman, was master 
of ceremonies, and was ably assisted by the 
flag raising committee, composed of A. Buefrrle, 
W. Gerth, J. D. Greene and A. G. Haar. The 
invocation was pronounced by the Rev. G. N. 
Jolly, who also gave a very interesting talk on 
the origin of the "Stars and Stripes." "Amer- 
ica" was then sung by the shop men, and then 
followed addresses by R. B. White, superin- 
tendent, T. L. Terrant, assistant superinten- 
dent, G. A. Bowers, general foreman at Stock 
Yards, and George W. Whipple, a pensioned 
blacksmith. The concluding address was made 




PARTICIPANTS IN Till': FLAG RAISING AT CINCINNATI TERMINAL 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 




JOSEPH P. COX 



by David E. Dick, ex-Senator from Maryland, 
who made an impressive and patriotic address 
that will be long remembered by those who 
were present. He also recited "Your Flag and 
My Flag' ' while ' 'Old Glory' ' was being unfurled. 
The "Star Spangled Banner" was then sung by 
the shop men, closing the ceremonies. Carna- 
tions were distributed by the Misses L. Flan- 
nery and B. Beineke, stenographers in the 
general foreman's and storekeeper's offices. 
Moving pictures were taken of the event, and 
were shown at a local theatre. 

Joseph P. Cox, seventy-seven years old, who 
completed his fifty-third year of active railroad 
service on April 30, has been promoted from 
city ticket seller to special passenger agent. 
Mr. Cox, or 1 'Uncle Joe," as he is known to 
railroad men throughout this section of the 
country, entered the service of the Cincinnati, 
Hamilton and Dayton Railway Company on 
May 1, 1864, in the Baggage Department. In 
1871 he became passenger and freight con- 
ductor. Two years later he was made general 
baggage agent, a position which he held until 
1885, when he was transferred to the city ticket 
offices. In his new position he will report 
to general passenger agent Squiggins. "Uncle 
Joe" is a native of Cincinnati. 



Illinois Division 

Correspondent, C. D. Russell, Extra Train 
Dispatcher, Flora, 111. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent 

C. G. Stevens Trainmaster 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic (Sanitation) 

F. Hodapp Road Foreman of Engines 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer 



H. E. Orr Master Carpenter (Sanitation) 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor (Sanitation) 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

C. H. Singer Freight Agent 

C. S. Mitchell Freight Agent 

Rotating Members 

C. F. Baker Engineer 

L. C. Price Engineer 

H. N. Murray Conductor 

S. Rittenhouse , Brakeman 

C. A. McCracken Machinist 

F. Parr'SH Machinist's Helper 

J. S. Clark Car Inspector 

J. Thome Track Foreman 



C. M. Newman, superintendent of shops at 
Washington, expects to start a school for ap- 
prentices, where they will receive mechanical 
instruction in the line of their work. The plan 
as outlined meets with the hearty approval of 
all the shop men. 

To be frank, we still entertain serious doubts 
as to the exact weight of the fish caught by 
Cameron Harrod, George Bultman and Walter 
Mischler. First, because we did not see the 
fish, and second because we understand that 
the scales had not been inspected by a Govern- 
ment inspector. 

August Hartman, storekeeper at Flora, was 
seriously injured on April 20, when the steel 
flagpole, recently erected at the storeroom, was 
broken off at the second joint by a heavy wind. 
The falling staff struck him on the head. He 
is reported to be still unconscious, but slowly 
improving. We all hope for his speedy recovery. 

Edward Cox has been appointed agent at 
Barn Hill, vice W. K. Meeks, resigned. 

W. T. Taylor, relief agent, has been granted 
leave of absence, and is, we understand, to 
scour the wild and wooly west in search of rosy 
cheeks and gold bullion. He is succeeded by 
C. S. Everett. 

J. P. Smith has been appointed agent at San- 
doval, vice A. B. Nance, transferred. 

With the issue of the next number of our 
Magazine we hope to be able to gladden a page 
with a photograph of the new station and office 
building at Flora. So prepare yourself for a 
surprise. 

Those desiring a copy of Employes Magazine 
forwarded to them at the French battle front, 
kindly forward address at earliest possible 
moment. You may not get the Magazine, of 
course, but we'd like to know your address. 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, I. E. Clayton, Division 
Operator, Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



F. B. Mitchell k Chairman, Superintendent 

R. W. Brown Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

I. E. Clayton Division Operator 

Harry Driver Machinist 

Fred Irey Road Engineer 

F. McKillips Yard Conductor 

P. K. Partee Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 



78 



THE BALT1MORETAND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



OX RAILROAD 



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Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first 
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The FOX Typewriter has every feature found in any 
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Pleate mention <>ur magazine when writing advertisers 




Pleasejnention oar magazine when writing advertisers 



80 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Miss Verna Weihl has accepted the position 
of car checker, made vacant by the resignation 
of W. W. Morris. 

A. Oakes, William Schoof, Frank Hoffman 
and William Schwab, dock employes, have 
returned from a vacation trip to New Orleans 
and Florida. 

General foreman Edward Schoof, who has 
been in the service for eighteen years, died on 
April 20. 

Harold De Lauder has accepted a position 
as office boy in the assistant superintendent's 
office. 

C. R. Hyatt, tonnage clerk in the superin- 
tendent's office at Dayton, has resigned to 
accept a similar position with our road at 
Cleveland. W. R. Sauerbrun, formerly of the 
Big Four Railroad, has been appointed his 
successor. M. S. Williams has been appointed 
assistant tonnage clerk. 



J. N. Ginan Conductor 

J. T. McGee Engineer 

M. Roach Car Inspector 

W. A. Bean Machinist 

H. F. Schwab Division Storekeeper 



The accompanying picture is of the flag 
raising, on April 21, at East Dayton shops. 
Employes and officers of the several different 
departments at East Dayton, all true Ameri- 
cans, regardless of ancestry, participated in 
the affair. 

As an expression of their patriotism, in the| 
present crisis when patriotic sentiment isj 
running high, the employes on this division! 
purchased a beautiful flag, which was raised ^ 
to the peak of a one hundred and fifteen foot 
iron flag pole, also purchased by them. 

The passing siding at Monroe has been 
lengthened 1,100 feet (by moving the east 
switch 1,100 feet farther east) and is now 
"O. K." for service. 



Wellston Division 

Correspondent, H. T. Heileman, Timekeeper 
Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. J. Carrell Chairman, Superintendent 

C. R. Elkins Trainmaster 

H. G. Snyder Division Engineer 

Geo. Carr Division Foreman 



Sandy Valley & -^lkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, George Dixon, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Laughlin Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenship Section Foreman 

S. H. Johnson Engineer 

E. E. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. Moore Conductor 




THE FLAG RAISING AT EAST DAYTON ON APRIL 21 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



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2 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Our 8 -Hour Day Parade 
and Celebration 




October 28. 1916 

Our 12,000 workers joined as one "Big Family" in a jollification in honor 
of the 8-hour day. 

It Was Our Family's Own Celebration 

To them all credit is due. It was conceived by them, managed by 
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BALTIMORE AND OHIO 
EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Volume 5 BALTIMORE, JULY, 1917 Number 3 



CONTENTS 



Officers at the Deer Park Meeting Frontispiece 4 

"Help Win the War" the Keynote of the Annual Officers' 

Meeting, held at Deer Park Hotel, June 29 and 30 5 

The Patriotic Duty of the Baltimore and Ohio Man- 
President Willard's Deer Park Address 10 

Statement of Pension Feature 25 

Dr. Joseph F. Tear ney— Obituary 26 

The Prevention of Water Waste Henry Gardner, Assistant Engineer 28 

The Troubles of Mr. Way-Bill and the Freight Family— No. 7— 

Unloading... H. Irving Martin 31 

What the Railroads are Doing to Help Win the War Howard Elliott 32 

Books That Will Be of Assistance to the Man Who Expects to 

Render Military Service 38 

Editorial 40 

Teamwork as Important in the Army as On the Railroad 

Robert M. Van Sant 42 

How Women Can Fight Gelett Burgess, of the Vigilantes 44 

Home Dressmaker's Corner 45 

Special Merit 47 

Troop Movements Over the Baltimore and Ohio 50 

Among Ourselves 51 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of the sheet only. 




4 



"Help Win the War" the Keynote of Annual 
Officers' Meeting, Held at Deer 
Park Hotel, June 29 and 30 



□ 



"fTTlELP WIN THE WAR!"— that 
I 11 J was the keynote of the Annual 
pPJffiffl Meeting of the officers of the 
UbBbHI Baltimore and Ohio, held at the 
Deer Park Hotel on Friday, June 29 and 
Saturday, June 30. 

To most of those who attended this 
year's meeting there is one picture 
that will remain clear after all the others 
have faded. Years from now, after calmer, 
happier times have come to the world 
now in the throes of the greatest and 
most terrible war in history, mention 
of America's entrance into the struggle 
will bring back to them the picture of a 
crowded convention hall, of the eager, 
intent faces of their fellow officers and of 
a man who spoke evenly and quietly, 
emphasizing a point, now and then, by 
tapping the palm of one hand with the 
forefinger of the other, but who spoke of 
great things and pointed out to his 
hearers the railroad man's path of duty, 
and told them of their responsibility and 
privilege in this hour of crisis. Not less 
clear will be the picture of the men of 
the Baltimore and Ohio rising as one to 
cheer their president and to pledge their 
loyalty to their country, their flag, their 
railroad and their leader. 

Deer Park meetings are always inter- 
esting and helpful. At some of them 
there are dramatic moments, like the one 
last year when President Willard appealed 
to the men of our road to aid, in every 
way possible, the efforts of the Govern- 
ment in transporting our troops to the 
Mexican Border. But never before has 
there been a meeting so full of intense 



interest and so rife with dramatic incident 
as this year's. 

It is probable that every man who 
attended the meeting did so with full con- 
sciousness of the fact that we are living in 
dangerous times, and that every man 
there had some conception of the task 
that lies before us. But it is certain that 
every man left Deer Park, at the end of 
the two-day meeting, with a clearer and 
fuller knowledge of the issues at stake 
and with a more thorough understanding 
of how he could do his part. 

Special trains carried the officers of the 
road from their posts on the System, arriv- 
ing at Deer Park Hotel, on the crest of 
the Alleghenies, early on the morning of 
the 29th. The railroaders were up and 
about early, and the usual informal and 
enjoyable get together meeting was in 
full swing in the lobby of the big hotel 
a half hour before breakfast was served. 

A military note was added to the crowd 
in the lobby by a man in the olive drab 
service uniforn of the United States army. 
It was Major — now Colonel — Charles D. 
Hine, special assistant to the president, 
who has been commissioned a colonel in 
the New York Division, National Guard, 
and placed in command of Headquarters, 
Trains and Military Police. Colonel 
Hine was graduated from West Point in 
1891 and after four years as a lieutenant 
in the army started his railroad career, 
which has been a distinguished one. He 
served in the Spanish-American war as 
a major of volunteers and at the beginning 
of the present conflict at once offered his 
services to the Government . Rumor says 



5 



6 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




that the New York Division of the 
National Guard is "for the front" at an 
early date, and it seems certain that 
Colonel Hine will again have the oppor- 
tunity of smelling powder. With him 
will go the best wishes of his fellow officers 
and of the employes of our System, among 
whom he is especially popular. 

President Willard's Address 

The morning session was convened at ten 
o'clock, with Arthur W. Thompson, vice- 
president in charge of traffic and com- 
mercial development, in the chair. Mr. 
Thompson called the meeting to order 
and after some brief but interesting open- 
ing remarks introduced Daniel Willard, 
the president of our System. 

It was the privilege of our officers to 
hear Mr. Willard speak on the great 
issues involved in the world-wide struggle 
and point out the way in which those of 
us who stay at home can do our work of 
helping to win the war as effectively as 
will the men who will help our Allies 
drive the invading Germans from out- 
raged France and martyred Belgium. 
As chairman of the Civilian Advisory 
Committee of the Council of National 
Defense, he spoke with the authority of a 
man close to the Government, but he also 
spoke with the freedom and frankness of 
a man talking to the members of his own 
family. His object was to bring home 
to the officers of our railroad — and through 
them to all the employes of the railroad — 
the seriousness of the struggle before us 
and to impress upon them the fact that 
they were, first of all, citizens of the United 
States, and after that employes of the 
Baltimore and Ohio, and that by per- 
forming their railroad duties to the very 
best of their ability they could, in the 
most effective way possible, do their 
part in helping to win the war. 

Mr. Willard's speech is printed in full 
in this issue of the Magazine and no fur- 
ther comment upon it is necessary. It 
will be unnecessary to advise every em- 
ploye of the road, no matter what his 
position, to read it and read it carefully. 
It tells, as clearly and forcibly as could 
be told, the responsibility and the duty 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



7 



of the railroad man in this grave crisis. 
The effect it had upon the men who heard 
it is well illustrated by a remark made by 
one of our superintendents on the hotel 
veranda, shortly after Mr. Willard had 
finished speaking : 

"Well, it made me want to take in 
another notch in my belt and DO some- 
thing. And I'm going to!" 

Traffic and Commercial Development 
Department Meeting 

Mr. Thompson was also chairman of 
the afternoon session, which was devoted 
to the work of the Traffic and Commercial 
Development Departments. Among the 
speakers were C. S. Wight, general freight 
representative; Archibald Fries, freight 
traffic manager; C. L. Thomas, freight 
traffic manager; O. A. Constans, freight 
traffic manager; 0. P. McCarty, passenger 
traffic manager; W. B. Calloway, general 
passenger agent; B. N. Austin, general 
passenger agent; G. W. Squiggins, gen- 
eral passenger agent; E. V. Baugh, super- 
intendent of dining car service (who 
almost equalled the reputation for wit- 
tiness acquired at last year's meeting by 
Mr. McCarty); C. W. Woolford, the 
secretary of the Company; H. A. Lane, 
chief engineer and W. H. Manss, assist- 
ant to the vice-president in charge of 
commercial development. A more com- 
plete account of the meeting of the Traffic 
and Commercial Development Depart- 
ments will appear in the August issue of 
the Magazine. 

Friday Evening's Session 

The evening session was opened by an 
address by Mr. Charles D. Norton, vice- 
president of the First National Bank of 
New York, president of the Coal and 
Coke Railway, and a member of the War 
Council of the Red Cross. After saying 
a few jocular things about his railroad 
which Drought roars of laughter from his 
hearers, Mr. Norton grew serious and told 
of the great work of mercy being under- 
taken by the Red Cross, and made an 
appeal to the officers of our road, and 
through them to the employes, to support 
the Red Cross loyally and generously. 



Motion pictures of our new Curtis Bay 
Coal Pier were then presented by M. A. 
Long, assistant to the chief engineer, and 
Mr. J. H. Waterman, of the C. B. & Q., 
showed motion pictures of and described 
that road's timber treating plant at 
Galesburg, 111., of which he is superin- 
tendent. Mr. Waterman's side remarks 
proved that in addition to being an expert 
in the treatment of timber he is a humorist 
of no mean order, and his address and 
pictures were hugely enjoyed by the 
audience. 

The Meeting of the Accounting, Claim, 
Treasury and Relief Departments 

Saturday morning's session was devoted 
to the work of the Accounting, Claim, 
Treasury and Relief Departments. Vice- 
president George M. Shriver was to have 
presided, but, to the deep regret of all, im- 
portant business made it impossible for 
him to be present, and his place as chair- 
man was filled by George H. Campbell, 
assistant to the president . After reading a 
telegram from Mr. Shriver, expressing his 
regret at not being able to be present, Mr. 
Campbell paid a tribute to the memory of 
Oscar G. Murray, late president of the 
Board of Directors and a former president 
of the Baltimore and Ohio, and explained 
the conditions of his will, under which be- 
nevolence will be extended to widows and 
orphans of employes of our Company. 
President Willard also paid tribute to 
Mr. Murray's services to the Company 
and to his many charities, and the officers 
stood in silence as a tribute to Mr. 
Murray's memory. It is interesting to 
know that the sum, applicable to the 
Oscar G. Murray Railroad Employes' 
Benefit, over $800,000, is greater than 
the total salary of the late official during 
his connection of twenty-one years with 
the railroad. 

President Willard then spoke of the 
excellent work done by vice-president 
Shriver and J. J. Ekin, general auditor, 
in the recent rate case. Addresses were 
made by Mr. Ekin, J. M. Watkins, auditor 
of revenue; C. C. Glessner, auditor of 
freight claims; G. H. Pryor, auditor of 
disbursements; W. M. Kennedy and W. 
J. Dudley, assistant superintendents of 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND 



OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




the Relief Department and J. H. Baum- 
gartner, publicity representative of the 
Company. A complete account of this 
session will appear in the next issue of 
the Magazine. 



The Meeting of the Operating and 
Maintenance Departments 

J. M. Davis, vice-president in charge 
of operation and maintenance, presided 
at the afternoon meeting. In his opening 
remarks Mr. Davis spoke of the employ- 
ment of women to take the place of rail- 
road men who are called to the colors, 
and of improvements in our equipment 
and right-of-way. He closed his remarks 
with an appeal to every Baltimore and 
Ohio man to do his "bit" in the pres- 
ent crisis, and to help the railroad live 
up to the record of cooperation with the 
Government made in the Civil War. 
Addresses were also made by general 
managers C. W. Galloway, R. N. Begien 
and W. H. Averell; F. H. Clark, general 
superintendent of motive power; Harring- 
ton Emerson, special engineer and effi- 
ciency expert; J. R. Kearney, general 
superintendent of transportation; M. K. 
Barnum, assistant to vice-president Davis ; 
J. F. Keegan, general superintendent; 
J. D. McCubbin, real estate agent; M. H. 
Cahill, general superintendent; H. B. 
Voorhees, general superintendent; F. P. 
Patenall, signal engineer; F. E. Blaser, 
general superintendent; C. S. Selden, 
superintendent of telegraph and general 
inspector of transportation; W. G. Curren 
superintendent of transportation; W. L. 
Robinson, supervisor of fuel consump- 
tion; E. W. Scheer, general superinten- 
dent; Colonel Charles D. Hine, special 
representative of the president; J. T. 
Carroll, assistant general superintendent 
of motive power; F. J. Angier, superin- 
tendent of timber preservation; Edmund 
Leigh, general superintendent of police, 
and F. J. Hickey, general superintendent 
of Wells Fargo and Company Express. 
The afternoon session was brought to a 
close by another address by Mr. Willard, 
who emphasized the points he had brought 
out in his previous address. A full 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



account of this session will appear in the 
August issue of the Magazine. 

And Then A Little Fun 

Saturday evening was devoted to 
amusement. The Baltimore and Ohio 
Glee Club was on hand and sang in its 
usual delightful manner, and the director 
of the club, Hobart Smock (always a 
prime favorite with Deer Park audiences) 
sang several much applauded solos and 
brought shouts of laughter from the 
railroaders with a dozen extremely funny 
stories. A new motion picture, "When 
the Call Came/' which was filmed under 
the direction of the passenger department, 
was presented by W. E. Lowes, assistant 



general passenger agent, and was heartily 
received. 

Taken as a whole the 1917 meeting was 
a most enj oyable and memorable one. No 
man could have attended it without be- 
coming a better railroader and a better 
citizen. 

The general arrangements for the meet- 
ing were under the care of L. Bernstein, 
supervisor of traffic statistics, who was 
ably assisted by C. A. Spurr, chief of the 
facilities bureau. The program, contain- 
ing a photograph of Mr. Willard, was both 
attractive and useful and will be prized as 
a souvenir of the occasion. All that need 
be said of the accommodations furnished 
by the Deer Park Hotel is that they were 
quite up to the standard of that hostelry. 




STANDARD TRACK NEAR MANSFIELD, OHIO, ON THE NEWARK DIVISION 




The Duty 
of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Man 



President Willard's Address to the Officers of the Baltimore 
and Ohio, Delivered at the Deer Park 
Meeting, June 29, 1917 



Mr. Chairman and Fellow Employes of 
the Baltimore and Ohio : It is alwaj^s a 
pleasure for me to attend the Deer Park 
meetings and to have an opportunity of 
looking in the faces of so many of my 
associates in the service, and it gives me 
unusual pleasure to be here this year 
because of the great and important 
events which are transpiring and to which 
Mr. Thompson has briefly alluded. I am 
going to trespass on your time longer 
this year than I have at former meetings, 
because heretofore I have usually talked 
only on matters relating to the Baltimore 
and Ohio service. This year, however, 
there are so many other things of so much 
more importance that I feel that I ought 
to take the time — and perhaps you will be 
willing to grant it — to discuss some of the 
things that I have had opportunity to 
know about and which you perhaps have 
not had equal opportunity to become 
acquainted with. I want to speak, Mr. 
Chairman, intimately and frankly. I do 
not think that I shall say anything that is 
likely to give aid and comfort to the 
enemy, but I am going to talk as frankly 
as I can (applause), and I want you 
gentlemen to feel that we are here as a 
party of Baltimore and Ohio officers, very 
greatly interested in what is going on, and 



I hope that when you leave here you will 
have just as full an understanding of the 
situation as it is possible for me to give 
you, and that we may all go back with a 
firm determination to do our part. 

First of all, it should be borne in mind 
that primarily we are all citizens of the 
United States, we are also railroad men. 
While as railroad men some of us may be 
of higher official rank than others, on the 
platform of citizenship we all stand upon 
exactly the same level. We have exactly 
the same interests in the great events 
which are affecting our country, and I 
shall talk to you first concerning that 
phase of the matter. 

A year ago, you will remember, when 
we had our meeting here it was just 
after the President had called into ser- 
vice all of the National Guard and we 
were considerably moved by the possi- 
bilities of that occasion; and I said to my 
fellow officers that I hoped in doing our 
part — whatever we might be called upon 
to do in the moving of troops to the 
Border — that you would all consider these 
men — these soldiers — as members of your 
own families, that you would handle the 
trains in such a way as to give those who 
were going to the front at the risk of 
their lives a safe and, as far as possible, 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



11 



comfortable passage over Baltimore and 
Ohio rails, and I am glad to say that so 
far as I have been able to learn every 
effort was made to comply with that re- 
quest. No railroad in the United States 
handled that movement better than the 
Baltimore and Ohio (applause) The 
report that our officers made of the 
movement to the officers of the Govern- 
ment was highly satisfactory, and we 
received special commendation for what 
we did. 

On the 6th of last April this country, 
by formal action of Congress, became a 
participant in the greatest war that has 
ever occurred in the history of mankind. 
Before the United States entered the war 
we were told on good authority that there 
were at that time 37,000,000 men in uni- 
form and under arms on the various 
battlefields of Europe — not in the first 
line, it is true, but either at the front or 
in reserve — 37,000,000 men in uniform 
and under arms before the United States 
went in! Estimates have been made 
which would indicate that at the present 
time the cost of this war to the total 
participants is approximately $100,000,000 
a day in money and 15,000 men in 
lives lost — not crippled or wounded, but 
lives actually lost every twenty-four 
hours. But terrible as that is, it is 
only a mild statement of the case. It 
is just the slightest possible measure of 
what is being done. That statement 
takes no note of property destroyed, of 
those crippled for life, of minds shattered, 
of eyesight lost. 

The United States for a long time, 
longer than some thought should have 
been the case, kept out of the war. I 
tried, with many others, to be neutral. 
I had been in Germany many times. I 
had great admiration for the German 
people. I have a great admiration for 
the German people today. But develop- 
ments took place, things happened (all 
of which were laid before you by the 
President in his various admirable mes- 
sages, and all may know, if they desire 
to know, why it is that we are at war) , and 
the day when our Congress decided that 
we should enter the war, no matter what 
might have been my previous views, 
that day I ceased to be a neutral. I am 



not a democrat. I did not vote for 
President Wilson ; but this is not a matter 
of politics, it is a question of national 
existence; and today a man can occupy 
only one of two possible positions on that 
question: he is either for his country or 
he is against it (loud applause). There 
is no other possible choice. Of course, 
we are for our country, first as citizens 
and second as members of the Baltimore 
and Ohio organization. 

As Mr. Thompson has pointed out, 
one of the first problems requiring serious 
consideration after the declaration of war 
was the matter of transportation, and 
I feel that it is a great credit to the rail- 
roads of this country that in just five 
days after the Congress had declared war, 
men representing the 175 principal inde- 
pendent railroad companies in the United 
States assembled in Washington, and, 
after listening to a presentation of the 
situation, they voted unanimously then 
and there, and signed papers confirming 
their action before they left the city, 
giving to a small committee of five men, 
selected by these railroad representatives, 
full power to control the operation of all 
the railroads in the United States during 
the period of the war, in order that the 
railroads might thereby be in a position 
to respond immediately and as a unit to 
any demand made upon them by the 
President in the interest of the general 
situation . 

Nothing of the kind was ever done 
before by any industry, so far as I 
know, in this or any other country, and 
the railroads were the first to do it — and 
remember, only five days after war was 
declared. We went from a system of 175 
separate and independent companies com- 
peting with each other into one national- 
ized system under the control of five of the 
ablest railway men in the country. Why? 
In order that we might best serve our 
country and so best help to win the war. 
That is why it was done. No other 
reason in the world would have induced 
those executives to turn over their proper- 
ties to be run as five men might dictate. 
The committee of five men are sitting 
constantly in Washington, in effect with 
a map of the United States before them, 
on which is a railroad system 265,000 



12 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



miles in length, with all ownership names 
wiped out. They are no longer thinking 
in terms of C. B. & Q., Northwestern, 
Pennsylvania, or anything of that kind. 
They realize that they are faced with the 
problem of seeing that the necessary 
transportation service of the United 
States is performed. They find, for in- 
stance, that unless unusual efforts are 
made to move coal to the Northwest there 
is likely to be a coal famine there next 
winter, and, so far as they are able to 
prevent it, there will be no coal famine 
in the Northwest next winter. Early in 
the spring it became apparent that this 
nation would be expected to furnish much 
of the food stuffs required by our Allies, 
and with that in mind the Secretary of 
Agriculture urged the farmers all over 
the country to enlarge their crop areas 
as much as possible. In response to that 
request it is estimated that the amount 
of tilled land, the acreage plowed up this 
year, is at least thirty per cent, greater 
than it was a year ago. Now, in order 
that the program might be a success, that 
we might have more crops, that this 
additional tilled land might be productive, 
it was necessary to move quickly and in 
the spring, not at some other time, the 
things necessary to increase the crop 
growth, such as seeds, fertilizers and 
agricultural machinery. That was one 
problem, I repeat, and the railroads met 
it, and I have heard no complaint from 
the Secretary of Agriculture or from any 
other source that the crop acreage or con- 
dition has been restricted or impaired in 
the slightest degree by the failure of the 
railroads to furnish proper transportation. 

The importance of the railroads in a 
time of war is constantly illustrated. 
Marshal Joffre, when he was in Wash- 
ington a short time ago, said something 
like this, as near as I can recall: — "The 
Battle of the Marne was won by the 
railroads. Without the railroads it would 
never have been possible to bring up the 
supplies, to provide the armies with the 
munitions, and all the things necessary 
to carry on the battle. The railroads 
won the Battle of the Marne." That 
was the statement made by the Hero of 
the Marne, on<- of the greatest soldiers of 
the present day. 



Professor Lomonossoff, a high official 
of the Russian transportation system, is 
in this country now. A few days ago 
he also made the statement that unless 
they can have improved transportation 
facilities in Russia, it will be impossible 
for them to vigorously carry on the war. 
I am going to take time to tell you 
briefly just what he said about the rail- 
road situation in Russia. 

He pointed out, for instance, that 
Petrograd — which is, we will say, the 
Pittsburgh of Russia — had formerly ob- 
tained its coal supply from England. Of 
course, they use a great deal of wood also 
in Russia, but at the same time they 
require a great deal of coal. Owing to 
the conditions on the ocean, the menace 
of the submarine and the shortage of 
boats, Petrograd is unable longer to get 
coal by ships via Archangel, on the North 
Sea, as was formerly the case; the same 
condition obtains at Moscow. Other 
interests are also affected by the reduced 
coal supply from the North. Russia is 
not so richly favored by Nature with coal 
deposits as is the United States, and the 
only deposit of any considerable size is 
in Southern Russia near the Caucasus, 
1,400 miles from Petrograd. They are 
now obliged, because of that situation, 
to haul roundly 1,500 cars of coal north 
from the Caucasus each day, several 
times more than they had to haul in 
times of peace. That, in itself, was a 
pretty big transportation problem in a 
country so sparsely provided with rail- 
roads as Russia. Furthermore, the 
blocking of the Archangel route virtually 
made Vladivostok the front door of 
Russia, and where formerly equipment 
and other things much needed came in 
by a much shorter haul, now those same 
materials, if they get there at all, must 
come via Vladivostok and be hauled by 
rail 6,000 miles before they reach Petro- 
grad. Some of that railroad — consid- 
erable of it, in fact — is single track. I 
want you to know this because you 
gentlemen have got to play an important 
part in the winning of this war. I hope 
I will succeed in making that clear 
to everyone of you. I have no doubt 
that you have appreciated it from the 
first, but it will do no harm to repeat, 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



13 



that every man in this room has got to 
help win this war. Today Russia wants 
2,500 locomotives just as soon as they 
can be obtained and 40,000 cars. Why 
should we be interested in that? For 
this reason, for this very, very good reason. 
It is estimated that the Germans have 
some two and a half millions of their 
troops on the Eastern front. If Russia 
should be forced to make a separate 
peace with Germany, and she might be 
compelled to do so — not because of the 
change of government, because it is 
believed that that change has helped 
the situation — but suppose Russia should 
be unable to get supplies, to get food, to 
get ammunition, to get guns, and all the 
other things necessary for her army- — she 
might have to quit whether she wanted 
to or not, and if Russia should make a 
separate peace with Germany those two 
and one-half million Germans that are 
now facing the Russian Army would be re- 
leased and would be moved to the western 
front facing France and England, and 
that is the exact number, I suppose, of 
additional men which we would have to 
send over to oppose them. In other 
words, it may mean two million more of 
our young men to France if Russia is 
unable to meet her transportation prob- 
lem satisfactorily. It is because of the 
seriousness of that situation that it was felt, 
as soon as we got into the war, that one 
cf the most important things to do was 
to find what, if anything, we ought to do 
to help in that connection. Fortunately, 
Major Washburn, who had been in Russia 
all during the war as correspondent for 
the London Times, happened to be in 
this country and he appeared before the 
Council of National Defense and ex- 
plained the situation — told how important 
it was that Russia's railroad facilities 
be quickly improved so that she could 
carry on her operations. It was imme- 
diately decided to send a small committee 
of our best railroad men to Russia to find 
out what the situation was, and how we 
could be of assistance. 

It took some three or four weeks to 
arrange the preliminaries for sending 
such a committee, because things were 
just then somewhat disturbed in Russia. 



A country cannot throw off an old gov- 
ernment and take on a new one quite as 
easily as you can change your coat. It 
is a very serious undertaking, and we 
ought all to be glad that so far it has been 
carried on with such success that it 
promises to go through to a satisfactory 
conclusion. However, the committee was 
appointed, and comprises five of the best 
men who could be sent on a mission of 
that kind. Mr. John F. Stevens, chief 
engineer of the Panama Canal in its 
early stages, was made Chairman of the 
Commission. One of the five men se- 
lected was for a long time an official of 
this Company and is a sort of ex-officio 
officer of the Baltimore and Ohio at the 
present time, and a very dear friend of 
mine — a friend also, I am sure, of all who 
know him — John Greiner. Today he is 
in Russia performing a very valuable 
service for our country (applause). The 
Canadian Pacific Railroad, at our request, 
held the " Empress of Asia," one of their 
largest steamships, four days at Van- 
couver for the committee — they being 
unable to reach there sooner. They were 
met with a special train at Vladivostok, 
and taken through to Petrograd. The 
burden of all letters and cables that we 
get from them is "send cars and engines 
without limit; we must have cars and 
engines quickly, and we must also ar- 
range to erect the cars and engines 
ourselves." Heretofore, because of there 
being no shops at Vladivostok, the 
engines have been hauled 400 miles to 
Harbin to be set up in the shops at that 
place. They have now asked us to erect 
them at Vladivostok, and that also we 
are going to do. Now, why do I mention 
all this? For this reason : the combined 
output of the locomotive shops in this 
country is about 5,500 a year. Russia 
wants a thousand engines before the first 
of January, and at least 2,000 next year. 
England and France require from 1,000 
up to as many as we can give each year. 
But suppose we give Russia 1,500 next 
year and England and France 1,000? 
That is nearly one-half of the average 
total locomotive output of this country. 
We also need more power on our rail- 
roads, but shall we sit down and hold on 



14 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



to everything we have and see Russia 
forced to a separate peace? Shall we, 
in order to make our own task somewhat 
easier, to meet a situation that is un- 
doubtedly pressing here, hold on to all 
the new engines we can build, facing the 
possibility that because of such action we 
may have to send 2,000,000 more of our 
young men to the battle line? Or shall 
we say to the builders "You send the 
engines that Russia wants, you send the 
engines that France and England want, 
and we by additional effort will under- 
take to carry the greatly increased burden 
put upon us, with what we already have;" 
that is why I ask you to be more careful 
of your power, to keep it in better shape, 
to get more out of it, to try constantly to 
do more with what you have. Not be- 
cause we do not want to spend money, 
although that is a good reason, but be- 
cause we want to send every available 
car and engine to our Allies so that on 
that account we will be called on to send 
fewer of our young men. I want you to 
think of that seriously. The railroad 
committee in Washington, which sits 
there constantly, is endeavoring to deal 
with the situation in such a way as to 
contribute most toward the winning of 
the war. 

The railroads will not be able, no 
matter how hard they try, to carry all the 
freight that will be thrown upon them 
during the war, and this is why: They 
were measurably well equipped to per- 
form the service of the country before the 
war began. As a matter of fact, for a 
period of some seven or eight years there 
was nearly always a surplus of anywhere 
from 50,000 to 350,000 freight cars. It 
cannot be said that the railroads were not 
fairly equipped to do the work required 
of them when the war began. Since then, 
and particularly within the last six 
months, we have done what I have al- 
ready pointed out toward increasing the 
crop average. Our shops and factories 
wen; working feverishly day and night 
before we entered the war, making 
munitions for our Allies. Since then this 
government has appropriated two billions 
of dollars for the necessary supplies for 
its own army, superimposed on what we 
were already undertaking to do. 



In addition to that, many boats on the 
Lakes which formerly carried a large 
volume of business east and west have 
been taken off, sent down through the 
Welland Canal and are now in Trans- 
Atlantic service. The boats that form- 
erly ran up and down the Pacific Coast, 
carrying coal from Vancouver to southern 
points, have been taken off to be used as 
mine-sweepers, patrols and in transport 
service for the Navy. In the east a con- 
siderable number of boats that formerly 
were in our Atlantic coastwise service 
have been taken off. The business they 
formerly carried is now being done by 
the railroads. Not only have boats 
been taken off, but insurance rates on 
the water are so high, because of the sub- 
marine menace, that much of the busi- 
ness that might go by boats is now going 
by the railroads, and still further, the 
boats that formerly ran through the 
Panama Canal are now in other service. 
All that puts additional work upon the 
railroads, and that they have responded 
to the situation as well as they have I 
think is a great credit to everyone engaged 
in the railroad calling. Now, for the 
reasons given, the railroads will not be able 
to carry all the freight that may be 
offered. That is one of the things that I 
wish you gentlemen to understand, so 
that you will be able to help the public 
understand — that part of the public with 
which you come in contact. 

The railroads will probably be able to 
carry all of the food stuffs necessary. 
They will carry the necessary coal and 
munitions, and they will carry the steel 
to make ships, all of the things necessary 
from the standpoint of winning the war, 
and this will not exhaust their capacity. 
But let us say that it will take seventy- 
five per cent, of their capacity to perform 
service of the kind mentioned, leaving 
twenty-five per cent, of the capacity for 
the ordinary business of the country. 
Probably the ordinary business of the 
country at the present time requires 
double that capacity, so that part of it 
cannot be carried, and we must exercise a 
judicious discrimination. Congress has 
been asked to pass a so-called priority 
bill, establishing a small committee of 
men who will decide questions of that 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



15 



kind — questions of priority of movement. 
Because of the fact that aM things cannot 
go at the same time, they will endeavor 
to determine which particular thing 
ought to go first, from the standpoint of 
national defense. There has been, for 
instance, much complaint from the road 
and structural builders in Ohio, because 
the railroads could not handle the sand, 
gravel and other things necessary in carry- 
ing on their work. They appealed to their 
members in Congress and it looked as if 
the situation would become serious. How- 
ever, a small committee of representative 
men came to Washington, at the sug- 
gestion of Senator Pomerene, and the 
situation was explained to them as 
clearly as it could be. It was pointed 
out that we were at war — we were not at 
peace — that it was idle to say that things 
would or could go on as usual while we 
are at war — idle — worse than that, crim- 
inal — because it was misleading, and any 
serious effort in that direction would 
tend to prolong the war rather than to 
shorten it. That was pointed out to them, 
and it was suggested that they go over 
the situation and find out what particular 
things were of most importance and then 
come back and tell us what they wanted. 
It was suggested, for instance, that if some 
among them were using sand at points 
located on the Pennsylvania, that they 
should also buy it on the Pennsylvania and 
not on the Baltimore and Ohio, and vice 
versa, so that the delay due to the transfer 
of cars between railroads could be cut out. 
They were delighted to have these and 
other suggestions. It was pointed out 
to them that the railroads had not broken 
down, as is sometimes said, — that never 
in their history were the railroads carry- 
ing as much business as today, but that 
we must carry those things first that are 
essential to the winning of the war; they 
said — "Of course we understand it now; 
we will go back and cooperate with the 
local railroad officers and we will certainly 
try to make lighter your burden and to 
defer for the present those things that can 
be deferred without serious detriment." 

I mention that as an illustration; I 
know of many instances of the same kind. 
Now you men who come in contact with 
the public must explain the situation to 



them, you must say to them that there is 
nothing in this world so important to 
you, or to them, or to anyone interested 
in this country as the winning of the war. 
This is the only test we have: "Will 
the thing under consideration help win the 
war?" If so, it has our support ; if not, so 
long as the war continues, we are not 
interested in it (applause). I hope you 
men, because of what I say, will have a 
little better understanding of the situa- 
tion when you leave here than have many 
who are living in the interior, and it is your 
duty, and your privilege, too, to tell 
them what the situation is as you under- 
stand it, so that they can cooperate and 
help in what we are all trying to do. My 
own experience makes me believe that 
they will accept your suggestions and you 
will find cooperation instead of complaint 
That is why I am taking so much time to 
talk about the war and other related 
subjects because, as railroad men, you 
can carry a message, in fact many mes- 
sages, not only to Baltimore and Ohio 
employes — the 60,000 that you repre- 
sent — but to all the communities that 
we serve. I hope that when you get 
back you will all endeavor to get in 
touch with as many as possible of your 
men, and that they in turn will get in 
touch with others, so that what I am 
saying to you today may be passed on 
to every man in the service. If we 
could only get all the 60,000 employes of 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to look at 
this thing in the right way — not neces- 
sarily my way, but what seems in our 
common minds to be the right way — if 
all can only appreciate how much is in- 
volved, and the extent to which the 
railroads can and must help, the things 
that the employes of the Baltimore and 
Ohio alone can do toward creating a better 
state of mind, a better public opinion 
behind the Government carrying on the 
war — the good that they can do in that 
respect would be immeasurable. What 
they actually will do will depend largely 
on the message you gentlemen take to 
them. I am advising you as far as I 
can, and now it devolves upon each of 
you to do the same thing — to pass the 
message along. Every man in this room 
can give some man, and in some cases a 



16 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



dozen men, valuable information on this 
subject, and that is what you ought to 
do. I will not dwell upon it longer now; 
but I may refer to it again later on. 

Now we get to the Baltimore and Ohio 
problem per se, the one that we are all 
taking a definite part in, subordinate 
always, however, to the duty that rests 
upon each of us as citizens. I want to 
repeat that every man on this railroad, 
from my point of view, should think of 
himself first as a citizen of the United 
States and then as an employe of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad. 

During the year ending December 31, 
1916, the Baltimore and Ohio earned 
nearly $117,000,000. That was the 
largest amount ever earned in one year 
and, at the rate our earnings are going 
now, they will this year probably be over 
$125,000,000, thirty per cent, more than 
the road was able to earn, could earn or 
did earn, the first time that I addressed 
you in this room as the President of the 
Company, seven years ago. I suppose 
that if we could go over the record and 
read now some of the predictions that 
were made then it would cause consid- 
erable merriment. I remember, and 
doubtless you remember — I took some 
pains that you should not forget it — that 
I told you that I thought we ought to get 
a trainload of 500 tons, perhaps more 
than that. I think I said I would be happy 
if we got up to 500 tons. Last year we 
nearly reached 800 tons. That is a 
record of real accomplishment and as a 
prophet it makes me look like the pro- 
verbial "thirty cents" (laughter and ap- 
plause) . But it was done and it is greatly 
to your credit. You did it, and there is 
nothing further to be said about it at 
this time. That is not the problem that 
is before us to-day. I refer to it simply 
in oider that I may tell you of my appre- 
ciation of what you did, and how much 
better you did than I thought you could 
or would do. If we had not done that, if 
we had not been able to handle upwards 
of twenty per cent, more business with 
approximately twenty per cent, fewer 
t rain miles, we would not have been able 
to overcome in a measure the increasing 
basis of costs and long ago we would 
have been obliged to cut out our dividend 



altogether. That is how important it 
was that you should do the thing you 
actually have done. The situation con- 
fronting the railroads, aside from the war 
condition which I have spoken about, was 
never more serious than at the present 
time. Take the Baltimore and Ohio, as 
an illustration. As nearly as we can esti- 
mate, if we should do the same business 
this year as last year — we will probably 
do more — and employ the same number 
of men, our payroll would be approx- 
imately $6,000,000 greater than the year 
before and if we use the same amount of 
material as last year, that will cost any- 
where from twelve to fifteen millions 
more than last year. It is very conser- 
vative to say the cost of operation this 
year, because of the two items just men- 
tioned, will be at least twelve million 
dollars greater than last year. What was 
the net result last year? We earned 
nearly $117,000,000 gross, we pursued 
a fairly liberal maintenance policy — not 
extravagant, but liberal — we paid fixed 
charges, four per cent, dividend on our 
first preferred stock, five per cent, on the 
common stock and had only $2,500,000 
surplus left. If we were to operate this 
year on the same basis as last, and our 
expenses should be increased $12,000,000 
by the causes just mentioned and which 
are beyond our control, then as against 
$2,500,000 surplus a year ago, we not 
only would have no surplus but would be 
unable to pay any dividend on the com- 
mon stock. I have tried to m^ike clear to 
you the condition of the Baltimore and 
Ohio, because I wanted you to understand 
the situation just as fully as I do. 

For the first six months of the present 
year, to July 1, we will probably earn 
$5,000,000 more gross than we did during 
the same period a year ago, and we will 
have substantially the same net that we 
had a year ago, but we will be short some 
six or seven hundred thousand dollars 
of the amount necessary to pay two and 
a half per cent, dividend on our common 
stock during that period. Our directors 
decided to pay it, however, from accumu- 
lated surplus, as you probably have 
seen, because the first five months of the 
year, as you know, are generally the 
lean months — the operating expenses are 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



17 



unusually high. We expect that during 
the last six months, if business keeps up 
and if we get a substantial increase of 
rates — and that is very important — and 
you gentlemen bring to bear every effort, 
every thought, every bit of your expe- 
rience towards reducing the operating 
expenses; if we do all that, I hope we 
shall get through this year with our divi- 
dend of five per cent, fully earned. I feel 
ashamed when I think of the 28,000 Balti- 
more & Ohio stockholders and that we are 
only paying them five per cent, in times 
like these, on the money they have in- 
vested in Baltimore and Ohio stock. It 
isn't right, it isn't fair, the adjustment is 
all wrong, but because it isn't fair it does 
not follow that we must take a resentful 
attitude and not do the best we can. On 
the contrary, we must do even better 
than we can, if possible, towards carrying 
the thing through, and, I believe, an ad- 
justment will come later on, and I think a 
fair one. I believe the people are going to 
appreciate what the railroads as a whole 
are doing, how they have come to the 
front and subordinated their private 
interests to serve the country in this 
great emergency. I believe that when 
that is better understood the public will 
be disposed to give the railroads what 
they fairly deserve. So no matter how 
the situation may look now, we must go 
at it harder than ever in order to show 
that we have earned fairly, and there- 
fore deserve, more liberal and considerate 
treatment. 

That, of course, presents a very difficult 
problem to the Operating Department. I 
have frequently said in this room that I 
knew of no railroad in the United States 
where the problems of the Operating De- 
partment are as hard as they are on the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, due partly 
to its location and largely to the fact 
that it has not been able in the past to 
provide the facilities that it should have. 
The problem presented to the operating 
officials has always been more or less like 
trying to get a quart into a pint cup, and 
I have never known men who could get 
more into a pint cup than the Baltimore 
and Ohio men. It has always been a 
wonder to me how you did as well as 
you did in the old days, before we had the 



facilities that we have now. You are 
acquainted with what we have done 
during the last seven and a half years. 
It does not seem that long, but it is 
seven years since we first met in this 
room, shortly after I assumed the 
Presidency. During that time we have 
spent approximately $150,000,000 on the 
railroad. We have practically got a 
double track road to Chicago — it will be 
actually completed within the next three 
or four months. We have opened the 
long single-track tunnels on the top of the 
Alleghenies and constructed new double 
tracks, we have built the Magnolia Cut- 
off. We have added over 800 of the 
best engines to be had to our equipment, 
and 40,000 freight cars. We have re- 
built the- old cars that we did not dis- 
mantle; we have arranged to equip our 
through passenger trains with all-steel 
equipment; we have overhauled and 
improved many of our stations; we have 
added to our terminals and in many ways 
have made an entirely different property 
from what it was nearly eight years ago. 
We have done more than I expected we 
would be able to do within this period of 
time. 

The results, however, have been dis- 
appointing, not because of what you have 
done or have not done, but because of 
conditions over which we have no control. 
We could not foresee the unprecedented 
increase in wages. I am not saying that 
the increase ought not to have been made, 
but in any event we could not foresee it; 
we could not foresee this extraordinary 
advance in the cost of materials, and 
probably it is well that we did not foresee 
the future, because very likely we would 
not have had the courage to go into this 
matter as we did and as we ought to 
have done. But we have done it, and I 
think it is going to work out. It rests 
largely, however, with you men, the 
officers of the Company, whether or not 
it works out satisfactorily. But after all, 
and in spite of all these improvements, 
which have increased our capacity by 
thirty per cent., the same old problem is 
here again, the problem of the quart and 
the pint cup. We have now more 
business than our facilities are able to 
carry, and again the problem is — what 



18 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



can you do to get more out of this machine? 
How can you handle more business? 

I have paid you some compliments, 
well earned and well deserved, but I am 
not going to deal exclusively in compli- 
ments. There are some things on the 
other side of the ledger and I am going 
to be equally frank to criticise. There 
is one feature of our operation that 
everyone of us, collectively and individ- 
ually, ought to be ashamed of — and that 
is the inefficiency of our car movement. 
I will tell you something that perhaps 
you have not heard of, and if you have 
not you will be surprised — and you ought 
also to be ashamed — I am. We have had 
tests made by our own people, and they 
have also been made on other railroads, 
which show that the freight cars in this 
country are upon the average under con- 
trol of the shippers thirty-seven per cent, 
of the time — thirty-seven per cent, the 
shipper has the car ; six per cent, out of that 
thirty-seven being Sundays and holidays. 
That leaves sixty-three per cent . of the time 
of the car in the control of the railroad. 
Now, what does the railroad do with it? 
You may say, I suppose, that out of that 
sixty-three, probably forty-five or fifty 
per cent, of the time the car is moving on 
the road. Nothing of the sort. Only 
eleven per cent, of the total time of the 
car is it actually being moved. What 
happens to that other fifty-two per cent, 
of the time? Standing still in terminals, 
waiting to be switched, standing on con- 
necting tracks with other railroads, 
waiting to be repaired, being moved 
from the yard where the train left it to 
the warehouse — and things of that kind. 
Only eleven per cent, of the time is the 
car actually in motion; only thirty-seven 
per cent, of the time is it under the control 
of the shipper; and the Baltimore and 
Ohio is not any worse than others — as a 
matter of fact, figures show that bad as 
we are we were slightly better than the 
average, but that is the problem that 
confronts the railroads. 

Now we talk of cutting down the free 
time of forty-eight hours allowed for 
loading and unloading and certainly that 
would seem right in times like these, but, 
after all, it would only be a reduction on 
thirty-seven per cent, of the time of the 



car. Why not face the thing right and 
say, "here is fifty-two per cent, of the time 
which, if not wasted, is certainly not 
properly and fully utilized; we will cut 
that in two" — if we did that, it would 
in effect add 22,000 cars immediately to 
the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad's equip- 
ment. That is the most important prob- 
lem I have for the operating men this year. 
That is problem enough. Take that home 
with you, get all the results possible in 
that connection, and you will be busy 
enough. (Laughter.) 

I have said to Mr. Davis that we 
ought to make thirty miles a day with our 
freight cars. We have made as much as 
thirty-five, but we are not making that 
now. I told the Directors several years 
ago that if we were permitted to build 
double-track, new tunnels, etc., we would 
make thirty to thirty-five miles per day 
with our cars, and I pointed out how 
that would save buying new cars, etc., 
but instead of thirty-five we are making 
only twenty-eight, and we must make 
more. Of course what I ask is difficult — 
everything that is worth while is difficult — 
but I feel certain that it can be done. This 
problem of greater car mileage is worry- 
ing all the railroads, but I want to see 
the Baltimore and Ohio get the credit of 
fixing it first. You can do it, because it 
is reasonable and ought to be done, and 
anything that is reasonable can be done. 
Now, how will you correct it? My sug- 
gestion would be, that, knowing what the 
facts are, instead of looking to the shipper 
to do it all, although he should do his 
share, you get after the place where the 
car spends fifty-two per cent, of its time. 
Baltimore and Ohio bad order cars for 
some months have not exceeded two and 
a half per cent. So far as I know there 
is not a railroad in the United States or 
Canada that has a better record at the 
present time, and I want in that con- 
nection to pay my tribute to Mr. Tatum 
and those in his department. To reduce 
and hold bad orders below two and a 
half per cent, was a difficult accomplish- 
ment and has added greatly to our 
efficiency. 

Now, if you raise the mileage of our 
pars from t wenty-eight to thirty miles 
per day — that is very little, only two 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



19 



miles a day — it will in effect add 6,000 
cars to the equipment of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad. 6,000 cars at the 
present time, such as we use, would cost 
approximately $15,000,000. Our stand- 
ard steel hopper car that we bought for 
$800 three years ago would cost over 
$2,500 today. We cannot think of buy- 
ing cars at that price; and if we could, 
the steel ought to go elsewhere — for 
ships, for France, England or Russia. 
And this gets us back to my remarks a 
little while ago, about sending equipment 
to Russia. 

I think that rather than stand in the 
way of sending the urgently needed 
equipment to our Allies we should get 
busy and make more use of the cars and 
engines we now have, and that is exactly 
the problem I present to Messrs. Gallo- 
way and Begien. I shall be greatly dis- 
appointed if within the next month we do 
not raise the mileage of our freight cars to 
thirty miles a day, and from there on 
upwards as far as you care to go. There 
are other problems confronting the Oper- 
ating Department, but that is the prin- 
cipal one. I would prefer that you 
subordinate everything else to that and 
try to get more out of our cars. It is 
important, it is necessary, if we are to 
meet this situation. 

There is another question very closely 
allied to the one I have been discussing, 
and that is the matter of overtime. In 
May the overtime of engine, train and 
yardmen was twenty-five per cent, of the 
total train roll. That is a big and unpro- 
ductive expenditure and ought to be 
reduced, if possible — and I believe it is 
possible. A very considerable portion of 
that overtime was made at terminals. A 
train was ordered, we will say, to leave at 
nine o'clock. It got out at some other 
time, and consequently it got in later 
than it should. It was also detained 
perhaps after it reached its terminal, 
and the result was that a very consider- 
able percentage of the overtime, as our 
records show, was made in terminals. 
By organization and supervision you can 
cut down such delays. Another thing — 
thirty-four per cent, of all the overtime 
was due to meeting and passing trains 
and much of it accrued on double track. 



We must reduce overtime. We must 
expedite the movement of our trains, in 
order that we may be able with the cars 
we now have to do a larger business. 

Concerning maintenance — I have al- 
ready referred to what has been accom- 
plished concerning the maintenance of 
equipment — a most creditable accom- 
plishment and one that is a constant 
source of pride to me because those figures 
are reported monthly and are the subject 
of inspection and comment, and I am 
glad that in one instance at least the 
Baltimore and Ohio is at or near the top 
of the list, and for some reason other than 
the mere fact that its name begins 
with "B." 

We ordered last year, anticipating their 
need, thirty new Mallets such as are 
running on this division, and ten large 
Pacific passenger engines. They were to 
be delivered in July or August, but they 
will not be delivered until November and 
December. 

That is, the order will not be com- 
pleted until December, because I said to 
Mr. Vauclain that I thought it more im- 
portant that engines should be sent to 
Russia. I have said that I am in favor 
of giving Russia, if possible, a thousand 
engines between now and the first of 
January, and Mr. Vauclain says that it 
can be done if he sets back domestic 
orders. I have said that he could set back 
the Baltimore and Ohio's order and that 
we will get along as best we can with 
what we have. We are not now doing 
the best we can with our engines. Our 
engines are not in as good condition as 
they should be, that is to say, too many 
engines are waiting for repairs. There 
are only two proper places for an 
engine, one is in service, and the other 
is being made ready for service. We 
are not keeping engines in as good con- 
dition as we should and they are not mak- 
ing as many miles as they ought to make. 
These matters come largely under the in- 
fluence of the Operating Department, but 
if you do what I have suggested about 
cutting down overtime that will help 
greatly. The last engine condition report 
showed 9.6 per cent, of our engines either 
in shop or waiting for shop. There again 
our problem is a difficult one. I think it 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



is generally considered good practice on 
well managed and well equipped rail- 
roads to have a shop capacity sufficient 
to hold ten per cent, of the engine equip- 
ment. Unfortunately the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad's shop capacity is only 
about five per cent, of its equipment, 
about one-half of what I would like to 
see it. Now we have got to do with that 
one-half what well equipped roads do 
with double the facilities. I believe it 
can be done; Mr. Emerson says it can be 
done. I do not agree with Mr. Emerson 
in all things (I make that reservation on 
account of my relations with my staff) 
(laughter), but I am inclined to go along 
with him some distance on this propo- 
sition. I believe we can get our percent- 
age of bad-order engines down to six. 
Mr. Gill has already underwritten that. 
I shall remember that he told me one 
Sunday that he felt he could get the 
number of engines in shop and awaiting 
shop down to six per cent. Five per cent, 
would actually be in the shop and about 
one per cent, moving to and from. If you 
get down to six you will do well. You 
were up to nine and a half per cent, the 
last time I knew about it, the first of 
the month. If you get your bad-orders 
down to where I think you can, you 
will in effect add seventy engines to 
this Company's equipment, and we can 
let seventy more go to Russia. The 
mere doing of that thing may mean that 
the son of some man in this room will not 
have to go to France with a musket on 
his shoulder next year, or the next, or the 
next. That is one of your problems — 
you must get more out of your equip- 
ment, more out of your engines. Be- 
cause you cannot get new ones — you 
ought not under the circumstances to want 
new ones. After what I have told you, 
you ought to let them go where they are 
more urgently needed. 

The condition of power does not de- 
pond altogether on the shops. The con- 
dition of the engine depends greatly 
upon the treatment of the engine, and 
that very largely comes under the influ- 
ence of the Operating Department. The 
Mallet engines that we are now run- 
ning on this division we bought three 
or four years ago for $36,000 apiece. 



The thirty new ones of the same type 
which we have ordered and which will be 
delivered this fall will cost us $62,000 
apiece. I was told by a man a week or 
so ago that he had bought ten of the 
same type as ours, in fact duplicates, to 
be delivered some time next year, for 
which he is to pay $102,000 apiece. 

When engines have reached that price 
they must be treated like blooded horses, 
and that is something I want particularly 
to impress on the operating officers. I 
remember when an engine on the Balti- 
more and Ohio did not have many 
friends. It was hurried out of the shop, 
hurried over the road, and I never saw 
engines treated harder than they were 
treated here, and yet they responded 
very well; but it made the mechanical 
job on this railroad a hard one. I want 
to say to every man in this room — and I 
want him to tell others — when you look 
at an engine look at it as something that 
you are personally interested in, some- 
thing by means of which you are per- 
forming very necessary service, some- 
thing with which you are helping win 
this war. General Haig, I think it was, 
said that every little narrow gauge 
engine, such as those used behind the 
lines on the French front, was worth 
a battery of field guns. That was his 
estimate. Now I want to repeat — I am 
so anxious that you should remember it — 
we must help Russia, France and England 
with engines. We must do it and to do 
it we must, if necessary, let them have 
the entire output of the shops in this 
country, and at the same time we are 
being called upon to do the largest 
volume of business we have ever done 
and we must do it with the facilities that 
we now have. You must keep that in 
mind. When you look at an engine you 
must think that perhaps it is worth a 
regiment of men. Whether you get the 
most out of that particular engine or not 
may mean whether or not an extra regi- 
ment is sent to France. You must value 
engines in terms of men. I cannot impress 
upon you too strongly the importance of 
looking after them, caring for them, pro- 
tecting them from abuse, in order that 
they may do more and at the same time 
place less burden on our shops. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



21 



When I go over the road, as I do 
sometimes even now, and see an engine 
with its jacket half covered with sand 
and realize that when it begins to 
move that sand will trickle down into 
the bearings, in between the driving 
boxes and the hubs, into the eccen- 
trics and the other moving parts, all 
making for damage, hot boxes and delay, 
it makes me shudder, and I hope it will 
have the same effect on every man here. 
It is somebody's job to see that the 
engineers and firemen also understand 
what I am telling you, because I have a 
right to suppose that, being citizens, they 
are just as much interested in the out- 
come of this war as we are. It is your 
duty to see that they understand it. 
You should tell them that they must 
help to get more work out of the engines. 
They must not let their engines leak, 
which is easy enough to prevent except 
when engines have run so far that the flues 
are worn and the engine is ready for the 
shop. Except when it is in that condition 
an engine has no right to leak, and if it 
does it is probably due to careless work on 
the part of somebody — cooling off the 
tubes — letting the fire go down, knocking 
out the fire and running the engine into 
the roundhouse, half a mile away perhaps, 
with fire doors open and with cold air 
coming in. Not a single one of those 
things is necessary. You must instruct 
the men, you must tell them what 
they are expected to do and show them 
how to do it, and you must then urge that 
they do it and see that they do it. I be- 
lieve they will. That is another of the 
problems for the Mechanical and Oper- 
ating Departments. 

The Maintenance of Way Depart- 
ment — I shall not say much about that, 
because I speak of that currently all the 
year through (laughter). There have 
been decided improvements made in that 
department. This year sometime — I had 
'hoped by now, but certainly in two or 
three months from now — we will all feel 
a little prouder of the Baltimore and 
Ohio because we will then have a com- 
plete double-track railroad from Phila- 
delphia to Chicago. A very large pro- 
portion of that line is laid with one 
hundred pound and the rest of it with 



ninety pound rail. Much of the roadway 
has stone ballast, all of it is protected by 
some sort of definite, positive block, and 
the dusty part has been oiled. We have 
a line from Washington to Chicago over 
fifty miles shorter than any other line, 
and we feel that with the character of our 
roadbed, with our standard of service 
measurably approached by our engi- 
neer and with the new steel equip- 
ment, we are and ought to be the best 
line between Washington and Chicago — 
the growth of our business between those 
points justifies us in feeling that way. 
Our line to Chicago soon will be one 
of the best lines, it will be double-track 
all the way, it will be a first class rail- 
road (applause). We must see that the 
integrity of it is everywhere preserved. 
Operating methods must be carefully 
watched, the condition of buildings 
must be well maintained, everything 
must be kept in harmony, it must be 
kept a first class railroad. That is 
something we have all been working 
toward for some years, and we have nearly 
accomplished what we had in mind. We 
ought to finish it this year, and next 
year we will start on some other problem. 
Of course, the problems of the Mainte- 
nance Department are never ended, but 
a great deal has been done in the last 
five or six years in making a better road, 
a road that is cleaner and safer (ap- 
plause) . 

Now. as to the Traffic Department. 
It might be thought, perhaps, that there 
isn't much to be done by the Traffic 
Department, particularly at a time like 
this, when there is more business offered 
than the railroads can possibly carry. 
But that is a mistake. There is much to 
be done. The fact that our average car- 
load value has increased from $26.00 to 
$32.00 shows what can be accomplished 
by heavier loading and longer haul — and 
many other things may occur to you. 
Five or six years ago the average carload 
value was twenty-five dollars. Now it 
is something over thirty-two dollars. 
That much has been accomplished. As 
our traffic officers know, we are checking 
now more carefully to see whether when 
we get a car we haul it as far as possible 
and practicable before we give it over to a 



22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



connecting line. You would be surprised, 
if I were to tell you how much we have 
saved by careful checking of that one thing. 
That feature must be watched constantly. 
We must get a larger carload and longer 
haul. It may be necessary to raise the 
minimum. The public must be told the 
necessity for it — must combine and make 
full carloads. That is something for the 
traffic men to do. 

Then there is a great deal more that 
the traffic men can do — I like the word 
" commercial" better than traffic because 
that is what they really are, commercial 
representatives. There is a great deal that 
the commercial representatives can do in 
bringing about a better understanding of 
the mutuality of interest between the rail- 
road and the shipper. Neither one of us is 
worth much without the other. Most of 
our industrial communities are situated 
away from the chief natural avenues of 
transportation, such as the river — that 
is a natural highway. You cannot find 
today any large, growing center — Clarks- 
burg is a good illustration — unless it has 
good transportation. Its prosperity de- 
pends upon transportation.^ Clarksburg 
has natural gas, coal, oil, timber — it is in 
close proximity to everything that is 
necessary to make one of the most active 
industrial centers in the world, and what 
would it be if you took the railroad away? 
Nothing. All that nature has done for it 
would mean nothing without transpor- 
tation. At the same time, what good 
would it do for the railroad to be there 
without something to transport? That 
shows the mutuality of interest. When 
the shippers, through any mistaken 
notion or thought take a position which 
results in mistreatment of the railroads 
they are doing something that sooner or 
later is going to hurt them also and you 
should try and convince them of that 
fact. That is the duty of the traffic man 
— Mr. Thompson, Mr. Wight, you must 
Bee that the public understands better 
the railroad situation. That is no less 
an important task than getting tonnage. 
You must lay the foundation for good and 
lasting relationship and develop such a 
dose relation that when times get normal 
again, as they sometime will, we will have 
established such a complete understand- 



ing that our shippers will stay with us. 
That is the way to get business and 
better still to keep it. 

The passenger men also have their 
problem. We ran 16,000,000 passenger 
train miles last year. If we could get 
only one more passenger on each train 
there would be a material increase 
in net revenue. There is something for 
the passenger men to do right now. 
Then, in addition to that, they also have 
things to do in the way of educating the 
public. First of all, our passenger men 
should know what our standard of ser- 
vice is, because, after all, that is the 
strongest soliciting factor. What is the 
standard of service of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Railroad? Well, if you expect to 
discover it by simply travelling over the 
road you may miss it; but I will tell you 
what it is in theory, and we are getting to 
it — in fact, have already gone a long way. 
In theory our passenger engineers are 
expected to start their trains so easily 
that you only know the train has started 
by the fact that things seem to be moving 
by. That is possible, that is a very high 
standard, but it is possible. In order to 
make it possible we have all these big 
Pacific type engines with automatic 
reverse gear. We have put automatic 
reverse gear on them, so that engineers 
would have easily at their command a 
force that would start a train as quickly 
and smoothly as possible, in accordance 
with our ideal. There is also another 
ideal that can be attained : they should 
stop the train so easily that you only 
know it has stopped by seeing that you 
are not moving. That can be done. If 
those two things can be brought about 
nothing that could be done by you or me 
or any of us would increase so much the 
popularity of our line. You ought to 
watch it. It is the duty of every man in 
the passenger, freight or operating depart- 
ment to make of himself an inspection 
committee of one, an intelligent critic — 
not a fault-finder. There is all the 
difference in the world between a critic 
and a fault-finder. Criticism of a helpful 
character is the most valuable thing we 
can have. There is much else that can 
be done that will increase the respect 
that the public will have for us and also 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



23 



their desire to do business with us; among 
other things, courteous treatment by 
ticket agents, as well as by train em- 
ployes — looking after all the little details — 
a good dining car service. I have com- 
plained somewhat in times past of the 
dining car service — I think "com- 
plained" is the proper word — and I want 
to say to Mr. Baugh that I think the 
character of our dining car service today 
is most creditable. It compares favor- 
ably with the best roads in the country. 
That is not to say that there isn't room 
for improvement, but it is very creditable 
(applause) . 

I will not detain you much longer. I 
have almost reached the end, but the 
occasion is so rare and there is so much 
to be said that I can hardly resist the 
temptation to talk longer. One im- 
portant feature of our commercial organi- 
zation is the so-called Commercial 
Development Department, started some- 
thing like a year ago. I know that you 
will all be glad to know what has been 
accomplished by that department since 
its organization. During the eleven 
months that have elapsed there have 
been 631 propositions submitted and 
favorably disposed of, 2.1 new industries 
have been located on the line for each 
day of the elapsed time. I have never 
heard of a better record of industrial 
development. 

A year ago some of you may have 
noticed in a circular sent out by the 
Moody Investment Company of New 
York a reference to the Baltimore and 
Ohio, in which the wisdom of spending a 
large sum of money for additional 
facilities was questioned. It was said 
that the Baltimore and Ohio was an old 
road, fully developed, and referred by 
comparison to such younger lines as the 
Burlington, Great Northern, etc. — I know 
more or less, by personal contact, of that 
new western country — but I venture to 
say there isn't a railroad in the United 
States that could show possibilities of 
such industrial development as that 
actually accomplished by the Baltimore 
and Ohio during the last year. I want 
you to know what the possibilities of the 
Baltimore and Ohio are in that direction. 
Now, to the extent that we give good 



service and treat our patrons fairly and 
squarely, to that extent will new industries 
continue to settle along our line. 

One other department that I want to 
speak of is a very important one, and 
this year many of its representatives are 
here. I often think of that department 
in the words of the Scotch poet. You 
remember that in one of his best poems 
he says: 

"O wad some power the giftie gie us, 
To see oursels as others see us, 
It wad frae mony a blunder free us 
And foolish notion." 

More nearly than anything else I think 
those words describe the Accounting 
Department. That is the department 
that enables us to see ourselves as others 
see us. The Baltimore and Ohio Com- 
pany is fortunate in having a good 
accounting staff and is particularly for- 
tunate in having at the head of its 
Accounting Department a man like Mr. 
Shriver (applause). While it is the 
chief function of the Accounting Depart- 
ment to record all transactions that 
result in the receiving or paying out of 
money, still I like to think that one of 
its important functions is to let us see 
ourselves as others see us. It is par- 
ticularly the function of the Accounting 
Department to hold the mirror up to 
nature and keep the mirror clean. They 
must prepare statements that are sent 
to our operating officers, telling them 
what they are doing, and when possible 
comparing our results with results ob- 
tained by other lines. 

There is one other matter I wish to 
refer to before I close. A number of my 
associates have recently asked me if I 
was going to leave the Baltimore and 
Ohio service. They said they had heard 
I was going to accept some kind of a 
Government position, or something of 
that kind. If this matter had not been 
mentioned to me so many times I would 
not speak of it, but I wish now to say that 
I would not voluntarily give up the 
Presidency of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad to take any position in this 
country, in any industry or in any service 
(applause and cheers). So much for 
that. As a member of the Advisory 
Commission of the Council of National 



•24 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Defense, I have for some months, been 
doing what I could in Washington be- 
cause I was asked to do so. The force I 
have in my Washington office, my secre- 
tary and clerks, work with me as Balti- 
more and Ohio employes. The Govern- 
ment does not pay us. We are all trying 
to help because we have been drafted and 
we do not want to be slackers. I thought 
we had an organization on the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad that could get along 
without me. I judged that I could drop 
temporarily, to a large extent, my duties 
as President while I helped out in the 
matter that we are all deeply interested 
in, and I judged rightly. We are for- 
tunate, I am fortunate, the owners of 
this property are fortunate, that we have 
the kind of organization that there is on 
this road. I feel that I can qualify as an 
expert on the subject. I have been an 
officer on the Erie, Burlington and Soo 
Line, and have had to do with the Great 
Northern and the Northern Pacific Com- 
panies, and I know the men on these 
different railroads; I have worked with 
them, and I am proud to say that I 
have never at any time been asso- 
ciated with a body of men more dili- 
gently trying to do the thing which they 
thought was wanted of them — I have 
never seen a body of men trying harder 
to be good, clean, square, decent railroad 



men, than are here on the Baltimore and 
Ohio (applause). 

Now just one more thing. I have been 
talking of many details, but the impres- 
sion that in closing I wish to leave with 
you is about the important duty that 
confronts us all as citizens rather than as 
railroad men, and as bearing on that I 
am going to read a short extract from 
the President's Proclamation of April 15. 
He said, addressing the railroad men, 
"To the men who run the railways of the 
country, whether they be managers or 
operative employes, let me say that the 
railways are the arteries of the nation's 
life and that upon them rests the immense 
responsibility of seeing to it that these 
arteries suffer no obstruction of any kind, 
no inefficiency or slackened power." 
That is what the President, the Com- 
mander-in-Chief of the forces of the 
United States, says to the railroad men. 
That is his order to you as an industrial 
army, and I hope that the railroad men 
of this country will be just as eager and 
prompt to- carry out the orders of their 
Commander-in-Chief as the men who will 
wear our uniform in France ; and especially 
do I hope that the employes and officers 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Company — the 
first railroad in this country in point of 
time, will also be the first in terms of 
service in this great emergency (cheers). 



* — *. 

I 

-4. 



^Vin Si Prize ^ ^en dollars ^ s being awarded each 



with 

Safety Article! 



quarter of the year to the employe 
submitting the best original article on 
Accident Prevention. The present con- 
test period ends September 30. Send 
your contribution to John T. Broderick, 
Supervisor Special Bureaus, Baltimore 
and Ohio Building, Baltimore. 




Statement of Pension Feature 



Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of June, 1917, and to whom pensions 
have been granted : 



NAME 



Bailey, Charles W . . . 
Bowings, Lanson. . . . 

Brown, George T 

Carroll, George A — 
Compton, Robert M . . 
Durland, George C . . 

Ellis, Thomas W 

Ferguson, Francis M 

Frank, John F 

Henderson, John. . . . 
Holland, William J. . 

Johns, William A 

Knoske, J. Charles . . 

Loughery, David 

Reese, George W . . . . 

Saville, John O 

Sipes, John T 

Spath, Joseph 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



Agent 

Crossing Watchman. 

Laborer 

Mat'l Distributer. . . 

Carpenter 

Machinist. 

Pumper 

Switchtender 

Machinist 

Carpenter 

Yard Engineer 

Crossing Watchman. 

Engineer. 

Engineer 

Yard Conductor .... 

Trackman 

Brakeman 

Laborer 



C. T . . 
C. T.. 
C. T 
Stores . . 
M. P . . . 
M. P. . 
C. T. . . . 
C. T . . 
M. P. . 
M. of W 
C. T.. 
C. T ... 
C. T.. 
C. T. .. 
C. T.. 
M. of W 
C. T.. 
M. P. . 



Ohio 

Baltimore 

Cleveland 

Ohio River. . . . 
Ohio River. . . . 

Indiana 

Monongah 

C. T. R. R. Co 

Illinois 

Newark 

Pittsburgh 

Newark 

Philadelphia . . 

Newark 

Chicago 

Cumberland. . . 
Philadelphia . . 
Ohio 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



43 
48 
40 
27 
22 
47 
31 
10 
46 
29 
27 
49 
29 
47 
22 
45 
45 
10 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1916, over $296,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 
those who had been honorably retired. 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,082,341.75. 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number of years, the following employes have 
died: 



NAME 



LAST OCCUPATION D men* T " 



Strahl, Charles L 

Carothers, Frederick. . 
Gorman, Cornelius — 

Harrison, John R 

McKibben, Joseph F . . 

Quarles, M. S 

Ogden, John J 

Ebert, Charles W 

Decker, Levi W 

Malloy, James 

Vermillion, Joseph N. . 



DIVISION 



DATE OF YEARS OF 
DEATH SERVICE 



Laborer C. T... 

Engineman C. T 

Lamp Lighter C. T. . 

Conductor C. T. .. 

Agent C. T... 

Crossing Watchman. . C. T ... 

Shop Carpenter M. P. . . 

Baggagemaster C. T 

Pipeman M. ofW. 

Crossing Watchman. . C. T. . . 

Watchman C. T. : 



Wheeling May 

Pittsburgh .... May 

New Castle . . . May 

Cumberland. . . May 

Ohio June 

Baltimore June 

Ohio River. . . . June 

Ohio River. . . . June 

Cumberland... June 

Philadelphia. . . June 

Baltimore June 



24, 1917. 

28, 1917. 

30, 1917. 

31, 1917. 
3, 1917. 

8, 1917. 

9, 1917. 
15, 1917. 
19, 1917. 
24, 1917. 

29, 1917. 



42 
42 
23 
37 
23 
40 
12 
20 
31 
29 
24 



25 




THE LATE DR. JOSEPH F. TEARNEY 



20 



DR. JOSEPH F. TEARNEY 

BORN JANUARY 17, 1855 DIED JUNE 25, 1917 



DR. JOSEPH F. TEARNEY, formerly chief medical examiner 
of the Relief Department, died on June 25, after a protracted 
illness, at his residence in Baltimore. 

Dr. Tearney was born in Harper's Ferry, Va., on January 17, 
1855. After being graduated from Mount Saint Mary's College, 
Emmitsburg, Maryland, in 1875, where he received the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts, he entered the Medical Department of the 
University of Maryland and was graduated therefrom in 1879. 

In 1884 he entered the service of the Baltimore and Ohio as 
a medical examiner and in 1909 became assistant to the late 
Dr. S. B. Bond, chief medical examiner. In 1912 he was promoted 
to the position made vacant by the death of Dr. Bond, and acted 
as chief medical examiner until a few months ago, when, because 
of ill health, he voluntarily sought retirement from active duty. 

Interment was made in Harper's Ferry, on Thursday, June 28. 

During the period of his connection with the Company, and 
particularly during his association with Dr. S. B. Bond and during 
his own administration as chief medical examiner, Dr. Tearney 
was identified with and inaugurated many plans designed to 
promote the welfare, contentment, health and safety of the vast 
army of the Company's employes. A physician of high professional 
attainments, unfailingly courteous and genial, with inexhausti- 
ble patience and sympathy, he endeared himself to all who sought 
his advice and assistance. 

No more fitting eulogy may be pronounced on Dr. Tearney's 
life than "He was every man's friend." 



The Prevention of Water Waste 



The Baltimore and Ohio's Water Bill is a Million a Year 

By Henry Gardner 

Assistant Engineer 



|EXT to coal, perhaps no single 
commodity is used more fre- 
quently on our railroads than 
water. The estimated annual 
consumption of water by locomotives 
on all the railroads in the United States 
is 450 billion gallons. The total con- 
sumption of water for all purposes is in 
excess of 625 billion gallons per year. 
On the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
these figures would become, based on 
the number of locomotives, approxi- 



mately sixteen billion gallons for loco- 
motives and twenty-two billion gallons 
for all purposes, per year. At an average 
estimated cost of five cents per 1000 
gallons the water for locomotives would 
cost $800,000 and for all uses over 
$1,000,000 per year. 

On the locomotive water is wasted by 
incorrect running and firing, by steam 
leaks, by improperly sprinkling coal and 
washing decks, by safety valves popping, 
taking water at penstocks, etc. By the 






FIGURE I— CARELESSNESS IN FILLING TANKS RESULTS NOT ONLY IN WASTE OK 
WATER, BUT IN DAMAGE TO TRACE 



2H 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



29 




WATER IS GENERALLY CONSIDERED TO BE AS FREE AS AIR— BUT IT ISN'T! 



correct use of injectors and systematic 
running and firing a very large quantity 
of water may be saved. Much depends 
upon using injectors of proper size and 
keeping them in repair, enabling the 
operator to feed water to boilers in a fine 
and constant stream. Steam leaks are 
water leaks, and the great waste of coal 
and water through safety valves is well 
understood by all. Firemen are often 
careless in sprinkling coal and washing 
decks, using more water than necessary 
and doing it too frequently. Waste 
of water from locomotive tanks, when 
taking water, is all too common. This 
practice not only wastes water, but 
causes additional expense for removing 
ice from track in winter and replacing 
soft track in summer. (Figure 1 illustrates 
the waste of water from an overflowing 
tank.) As an example of the amount 
of water used by a locomotive in service, 
it is recorded from road tests that a 
Mallet engine uses an average of 257 
gallons per mile, or fourteen gallons per 
100 gross ton miles. There is consider- 
able water wasted in roundhouses and 
shops when testing and washing tender 
tanks and locomotive boilers, but this 
has been partially eliminated by the 
introduction of circulating systems, 



through which the water may be used 
over and over. A great deal of water is 
wasted at ash pits. 

Water is generally considered as free as 
air and much waste is due to carelessness 
on the part of employes, who fail to 
realize its cost. We must impress upon 
all that a saving in water is quite as 
important as a saving in coal, oil or other 
supplies. It has been estimated that 
fifteen per cent, of all the water used by 
railroads is wasted. By " wasted" is 
meant that this much water is drawn 
in excess of the amount actually required. 
One of the most expensive sources of 
water waste is due to running drinking 
fountains. Laws prohibiting cups have 
made the fountain a necessity. A single 
bubbling fountain, with a quarter inch 
opening at twenty-five pounds pressure, 
will deliver 425 gallons per hour; this 
would furnish ample drinking water for 
10,000 men and allow fifty per cent, 
waste. The only way to control this 
waste is to restrict the size of the open- 
ing and equip such fixtures with self- 
closing valves. The practice of plugging 
fountains open with bolts or wood blocks 
should not be tolerated. 

Yard hydrants for sprinkling, filling- 
water jugs and coach yard service also 



30 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



cause a heavy waste of water. A one- 
inch hydrant will waste from twenty to 
thirty cents worth of water per hour, or 
$5.00 to $7.00 worth per day. If all the 
hydrants in one large coach yard were 
left open, as is sometimes the case in cold 
weather, the loss of water is enormous. 
Leaking of improperly adjusted valves 
in toilet tanks will waste from $3.00 to 
$50.00 per month, depending upon the 
number of toilets and cost of water. A 
case is on record of a loss of $400.00 in one 
month from leaky fixtures in the toilets of 
one large terminal. Wash basins, slop 
sinks and other fixtures connected direct 
to sewers all cause heavy loss of water. 

The little leak is on the job twenty- 
four hours a day and seven days a week, 
and while it does not appear to be wasting 
much water a good deal is actually 



running away. A round hole yj" in 
diameter will pass 270 gallons in twenty- 
four hours at thirty pounds pressure; 
and 420 gallons at sixty pounds pressure. 
A hole rg-" hi diameter will leak away 
enough water to supply eighteen persons 
for washing, drinking and bathing for a 
day and a night. Water leaking through 
a M" opening in a sink faucet will cost 
about $3.00 a day or $1,095.00 a year. 
Consider what this may cost the Com- 
pany when we add together all of the 
thousands of faucets which are used 
constantly on the System. Finally, let 
us urge all to exercise the same care in 
using the Company's water that they do 
with water at home. 

We are indebted to the New York Railroad Club 
Proceedings for April, 1917, for some of the 
statistics given above. 



I I Baltimore, Md., July 1st, 1917. 1 

)\ 1 

) | TO ENGINEERS HANDLING PASSENGER TRAINS: j 



The Baltimore and Ohio standard of passenger train service depends largely on its 
locomotive engineers. 




I 



j | Safety, comfort and convenience are the essentials mostly desired by the traveling 

j | public, and a careful observance of the many details comprising these features will gain 

t I an enviable reputation for Baltimore and Ohio engineers and bring commendation to 

) | the Company. 

I j Uniform speed in maintaining schedules, or making up time subject to physical 

\ I characteristics and proper restrictions is of particular importance. 
/ I if 
j | On curves, over switches and crossovers, through tunnels, on bridges, etc., the j j 

( 1 control of the train should be such as to insure smooth riding qualities, preventing the f I 

) | slightest disturbance to passengers. § / 

/ | Stopping and starting of trains without noticeable effect affords many opportunities j / 

' } to favorably impress our patrons. 

• f The absence of black smoke and blowing off of steam at pop valves will add to the | 

I | comfort of passengers and public, and result in economy. 



Baltimore and Ohio passenger engineers are experienced and of good judgment, | 
and their combined efforts will be reflected by the extent to which this Company § 
participates in the passenger traffic. 



1 
! 

I 



Vice-President. I ) 




Freight Claim Department — 
Cooperative Claim Prevention 

The Troubles of Mr. Way -Bill and the 
Freight Family 



5S§ 




(pub 


L1C\ 










No. 7 — Unloading 



Continued Mr. Way-Bill, "Some high-brow chap argued with 
me that the word 'station' means a place where railway transpor- 
tation begins or ceases, but the life of the freight is not a happy 
one unless this cessation of movement happens easily, decently 
and in order. 

"The fellow who fell off a house said that the sensation 
wasn't so bad until he lit, and I suppose the freight wouldn't feel 
so peeved if it didn't light so hard. Some fellows think that they 
are honored because they have been graduated from 'the School 
of Hard Knocks,' If it is an honor to pass through this school 
it would be in order to give some of the Freight Family an arm- 
ful of diplomas to match the hard knocks which they have 
received. However, it isn't diplomas that they use to cover their 
knocks and bruises, but a bunch of papers supporting a claim. 

"Another thing that I, Mr. Way-Bill, want to leave with you ; is 
it right to unload freight out in the weather and leave it there to 
be soaked? 

"Some fellows think that freight has as nice feet as I have and 
that the freight can hoof it indoors and get out of the wet, but you 
know that we have to be some kind of a guardian for Freight and 
exercise care over it. 

"The shipper has the habit of thinking that he pays the rail- 
road to exercise that care, and, by gum, he's right. 

"Freight doesn't travel on apass — itpays its way, and the best 
of service isn't too good for it. 

"Then we get back to that checking question — after the freight 
is put off at the station we count the noses of all the packages 
that get off. It's the mix-up in the count and the failure to note 
exceptions on our records as to quantities and conditions, and to 
keep proper tab on what some other fellow says he shipped, that 
makes trouble in the future. 

"Sometimes the drayman doesn't pass over the goods, and why 
should the Company pay for what it never sees? If there is a 
clear check at both ends and proper record and reports of 
differences, itjmeedn't pay. Sometimes it happens that a reported shortage turns up later and is over- 
looked, the consignee doesn't get it promptly and another claim is paid. 

"Let us all take to heart the fact that the railroad is judged by the quality of the service it renders. 
If we remember this we will all be keyed up to cure claims by preventing them." 

Care at the station puts the claim agent off the job 
Money lost in claims never comes back 

The premium of efficiency is an insurance against claims 

— H. Irving Martin 



31 



What the Railroads are Doing to 
Help Win the War 



By Howard Elliott 

of the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, and a 
Member of the Railroads' War Board 



ARLY in April Secretary Lane 
introduced and had passed in 
the Council of National Defense 
this resolution: 
' 'Resolved, That Commissioner Willard 
be requested to call upon the railroads to 
so organize their business as to lead to 
the greatest expedition in the movement 
of freight." 

As a result of that resolution by the 
Council the chief railway executives of 
the United States met in Washington on 
April 11 and we had a prolonged dis- 
cussion of the situation. We realized, 
perhaps more than our patrons do, that 
the 250,000 miles of railroad in the United 
States, trying to serve a population of 
100,000,000 people, had approached the 
point, even in a time of peace, when the 
amount of transportation that we could 
manufacture with our plant was not 
adequate at all times to the demands of 
the people. The causes for that we need 
not discuss here; they have been dis- 
cussed pro and con for the last twenty- 
five years. It is the fact itself that 
interests us, and that is of vital interest to 
the nation and to our friends, the Allies. 

Realizing that it was difficult for the 
railroads to carry the "peak" load at all 
times and to be in readiness to serve and 
to meet every demand, we were glad to 
have this call to come to Washington, 
and to confer, that we might do what we 
could to aid in the general situation. 

The Railroads' Platform 

After conference and deliberation, and 
after a very inspiring address from Sec- 
retary Lane, the railroad executives 



passed this resolution, which is the war 
platform of the railroads: 

''Resolved, That the railroads of the 
United State.?, acting through their chief 
executive officers here and now assembled, 
and stirred by a high sense of their oppor- 
tunity to be of the greatest service to 
their country in the present national 
crisis, do hereby pledge themselves, 
with the Government of the United 
States, and with the governments of the 
several States, and one with another, 
that during the present war they will 
coordinate their operations in a con- 
tinental railway system, merging, during 
such period, all their merely individual 
and competitive activities in the effort 
to produce a maximum of national 
transportation efficiency. To this end 
they hereby agree to create an organiza- 
tion which shall have general authority 
to formulate in detail and from time to 
time a policy of operation of all or any of 
the railways, which policy, when and 
as announced by such temporary organi- 
zation, shall be accepted and earnestly 
made effective by the several manage- 
ments of the individual railroad com- 
panies here represented." 

That platform has been subscribed to 
by practically all of the railroads of the 
United States, and, in most cases, en- 
dorsed and approved by the boards of 
directors. 

It is a patriotic move on the part of the 
railroads, their owners, their officers and 
their employes, to do the very best they can 
with the plant at their disposal. 

In order to give effect to that platform 
a committee of some twenty-seven was 




32 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



33 



appointed, and from the committee of 
twenty-seven a committee of five was 
selected in accordance with the agree- 
ment made by all the railroads, "'that 
the railways should be directed by the 
executive committee of five." 

The Railroads' War Board 

The War Board of five consists of Mr. 
Fairfax Harrison, of the Southern Rail- 
way, as Chairman; Mr. Hale Holden, of 
the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy; Mr. 
Julius Kruttschnitt, of the Southern 
Pacific; Mr. Samuel Rea, of the Pennsyl- 
vania, and myself. 

We have subordinate committees re- 
porting to us, which were created co- 
existent with the military departments 
of the Government, as follows: 

The Northeastern Department, with 
headquarters at Boston, the Southeastern 
Department, the Central Department, 
with headquarters at Chicago, the 
Southern Department, with head- 
quarters in Louisiana, the Western De- 
partment, with headquarters at San 
Francisco, and the Eastern Department, 
with headquarters in New York. This 
form of organization was adopted so that 
there would be a piece of machinery with 
which each departmental commander of 
the Army could deal. In addition, we 
have as special subcommittees: 

A commission on car service, 

A committee on military equipment 
standards, 

A committee on military transporta- 
tion accounting, 

A committee on military passenger 
tariffs, 

A committee on military freight tariffs, 

A committee on express, made up of 
the vice-presidents of the various express 
companies. 

The men composing these committees 
were chosen from the most expert rail- 
way officers in the United States. 

Then we arranged to appoint general 
agents at all of the military headquarters, 
permanently attached there, with no 
other duties than to work with the mili- 
tary officers, and also general agents 
at mobilizing points. There are some 
fifty-six points in all, with 112 men to 
cover them. 



The War Board's Organization 

The Washington organization, with 
headquarters here, has in it sixteen 
experienced railway officers, including 
the five executives, composing the head 
committee, and eleven others who arc 
here permanently. There are in addi- 
tion sixty-nine general employes, and 
eighteen inspectors who travel about 
the country and bring in information. 

In order to do the^very best we could 
to get close to the local situation at every 
place, and to meet, as fast as we could, 
the difficulties of each given situation, 
some twenty-three sub-committees re- 
porting to the Commission on Car Service 
were formed at places all over the United 
States, Chicago, New York, Atlanta, 
San Francisco, Seattle, Memphis, New 
Orleans, and similar centers, so there 
would be a piece of machinery in each 
State, and several in some of the States, 
that could cooperate closely with the 
shipping and traveling public as well as 
with the military authorities. 

Each one of these committees has, as 
chairman, an experienced officer of a 
railroad, and on his committee are repre- 
sentatives of all of the railroads at the 
point in question. 

All of this machinery is now at work, 
and is being rapidly coordinated, so that 
after six weeks' work we have compara- 
tively little lost motion. 

It is a very expensive piece of machinery. 

Our estimate is that, not counting the 
salaries of the railroad officers, who are 
devoting a very large amount of their 
time to this National work, and carrying- 
on, as well as they may, their regular 
activities as railroad officers, the Ameri- 
can railways will contribute about 
$500,000 a year to this special work, 
dividing the expense pro rata of course. 
And we are glad to do it. We are not 
seeking commendation, but are merely 
trying to show the extent to which we 
are going in helping our Government 
and our Allies in this very terrible 
crisis. 

Speeding Up the Coal Movement 

Since we started to work we have taken 
up many subjects. One of the first and 
most important was to try to help move 



34 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



a greater quantity of fuel, which must 
be moved if the manifold activities of the 
United States are to go on, and if we are 
to make the things that we need and that 
the Allies need; and, as a corollary, to 
bring clown the greatest quantity of iron 
ore from the upper lake ports, so that 
the factories can make the steel and iron. 

We have modified the so-called car 
service rules and we think there is a more 
fluid movement of ,such equipment as 
exists. 

At the suggestion of the Council of 
National Defense, the Railroad War 
Board supplied to the Government five 
trained railroad officers, who were com- 
missioned to go to Russia to see what 
they could do to help the Trans-Siberian 
Railroad to move toward the Russian 
front the freight piled up at Vladivostok. 

Also, at the request of the Council, 
and partly at the request of the French 
delegation, we are arranging to obtain 
nine regiments of trained railway officers 
and trained railway employes to help the 
English and French people carry on their 
railroad activities, principally in France 
where, as you know, the man power is 
strained to the limit. 

We brought about, through Mr. Pea- 
body, of Chicago, an experienced coal 
owner and dealer, with the cooperation 
of the Lake carriers, and the ore carriers, 
a pooling of coal, so that when coal 
arrives at the lower lake ports, there will 
be a minimum amount of dela}^ in putting 
the coal into the boats, thus releasing 
the cars and sending the boats forward 
promptly. 

Much of the time of the Railroad War 
Board is devoted to conferences with 
those who are cooperating with the 
Government. We have had numerous 
interviews; interviews with the French 
delegation, interviews with the English 
delegation, and interviews with Mr. 
Hoover, to try to get a better method of 
coordinating the movement of food pro- 
ducts. 

War Board Cooperates with Congress 

We have been called upon by Mem- 
bers of the House and Members of the 



Senate, both individually and by com- 
mittees, to tell them something of the 
situation and of the problems with which 
we are dealing and the difficulties that 
we meet in trying to solve our particular 
problem. 

It is really the problem of the whole 
country, because unless we can get the 
maximum of efficiency out of the railroads, 
it will delay the preparations for this 
war. 

We had a meeting with a group of 
State railroad commissioners, and ex- 
plained our position to them and our 
desire to work in a cooperative spirit 
with them. 

The daily press has had much to say 
about the so-called car shortage, and 
the freight congestion, which the War 
Board is trying to solve through our 
Car Service Commission. That Com- 
mission makes a report to us once a week. 
They sit six days in the week and many 
evenings; they meet countless people 
with complaints. 

One Cause of Car Shortage 

Car shortage perhaps is a misnomer, 
though it is not a misnomer where the 
shipper is concerned, because he is not 
getting all the cars he needs. But it is 
a misnomer in that the failure of the 
railroads to supply cars is due not so 
much to the non-existence of enough 
cars, as to the fact that the railroad 
system is overtaxed as a whole because 
of lack of terminals, lack of sidings, lack 
of modern appliances on some of the 
railroads, and lack of modern appliances 
by shippers and receivers of freight in 
some places, so that the maximum use of 
each car is not obtained. 

These facilities have not been added 
to to the extent to which they should 
have been in the last five or ten years. 
Those of us who have been in the rail- 
road business a long time have preached 
for years that the country, for its own 
interests, ought to permit the railroads 
to spend at least a billion dollars a year 
in new additions to our plant. The 
country has not permitted us to earn 
enough to spend a billion dollars and our 
plant is not all that it should be. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



35 



Relation of Railroads' War Board to Council 
of National Defense 

The railroads formed their organiza- 
tion at the request of Secretary Lane, 
and we work with the Council of National 
Defense in the closest possible way. In 
fact, I believe we are designated a co- 
operative Committee. Mr. Willard, of 
the Advisory Commission of the Council, 
is a member of our committee ex-officio. 
He brings us suggestions from the Council 
of National Defense and takes from us 
suggestions to them. We advise the 
Council of National Defense weekly 
what we are doing or trying to do, so 
thay they may be informed and may 
better be able to make suggestions to us. 
We are working very closely together. 

We are trying to have, and I think we 
are succeeding in having, very close and 
satisfactory relations with the Interstate 
Commerce Commission. Mr. Edgar E. 
Clark, a member of the Commission, is a 
member ex-officio of our Board; his 
counsel and his experience are of tre- 
mendous value to us in our deliberations. 
Our aim is so to coordinate and arrange 
this enormous piece of machinery, this 
250,000 miles of railroad, so that we can 
make it of the highest service to the 
nation at this crucial time; indeed my 
observation leads me to believe it is more 
serious and more critical than people 
■realize, especially those who have not had 
the privilege of spending a few weeks in 
Washington. 

Our mandate and our commission have 
come to us through the voluntary act of the 
owners of these 250,000 miles of railroad. 
We are their trustees, and in trying to do 
our full duty to the nation we must fulfill 
the trust imposed upon us, by operating 
these 250,000 miles of railroad, having in 
mind the interests of the million and a half 
security owners, and possibly two million 
employes who, with their families, repre- 
sent nearly one-sixth of the population of 
the United States. 

What Cooperation Will Do 

We believe, because of the cooperative 
spirit displayed by everyone with whom 
we have come in contact, that as we work 
along, one step after another, we can 
obtain a greater efficiency out of these 



railroads than has been obtained before; 
that we can do the things that the 
Government wants us to do; that we can 
do the things that the Allies want us to 
do, and we can do the things that business 
wants us to do, and still safeguard the 
general health of this great piece of 
machinery, which must go on forever, 
after the war is over, to serve the public. 

More Efficiency Must Be Had 

One of the first things the Railroad War 
Board did was to put out what we called 
our efficiency circular. It was an earnest 
appeal to officers, to men, to the public 
and to those who use the railroads, to 
help and cooperate in every way possible 
to make a greater use of the existing 
American railway plant. This plant is 
inadequate in some directions, and it is 
essential to make every car, every engine, 
every track, every freight house, and 
every appliance do more work. To do 
that we must have the highest coopera- 
tion between the railroad owner, the 
railway employe, and the railroad users. 
This circular was put out to stimulate 
that idea. 

The Railroad War Board has been 
practically in continuous session in Wash- 
ington since April 23, going home to our 
places of residence and to our railroad 
headquarters on Saturdays and Sundays 
to keep in touch with the detail of the 
properties that employ us. 

How Available Cars May Be Increased 

On May 1 there was, according to the 
record, a so-called shortage of 150,000 
cars. In round numbers there are 
2,500,000 cars in the United States. 
If, by a little better loading by the shipper, 
a little better unloading by the shipper, a 
little better movement by the railroad, and 
a little more alert work by every man in 
the railroads, from the president down to 
the waterboy, each car was used a little 
better, it would not take very long to 
get that 150,000 cars out of the 2,500,000 
cars. It is about three-quarters of one 
per cent. 

The railroads, in spite of their diffi- 
culties, have done a good deal in the last 
eighteen months to try to add to their 



36 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



cars and engines. For example, there 
have been placed in service since 
November 1, 1916, 989 engines and 
44,063 cars. There are now under order 
as of April 1, 2,209 engines and 104,917 
cars. Those engines and those cars we 
hope will be received between now and the 
first of January. If so, since the first of 
November last and by the first of January 
next, there will have been introduced 
148,980 cars into the service, with an 
average capacity of over 50 tons, and 
3,188 engines, with an average tractive 
power of 54,000 pounds, which is very 
much above the average of the engines 
of the United States. 

Quantity of Transportation is 
Insufficient 

But in spite of all this I feel, and the 
War Board feels, that if the war goes on 
as we fear it will, the total amount of 
transportation that can be manufac- 
tured, under the existing conditions, when 
men are called to the colors or sent to 
France, or have to go into other forms 
of work, will not be sufficient. 

I am afraid there will be a continued 
shortage of transportation. In that 
event it is going to be necessary, in the 
interests of the nation and in the interest 
of the Allies, to use such transportation 
as there is for the essential things. The 
public should willingly give up the non- 
essentials. In other words, it is going 
to be a great deal more important for 
this country to move food, fuel and iron, 
and the essentials of life and manufac- 
turing, than it is to move what might 
be called the luxuries, the things that we 
can get along without in this terrible 
world crisis. We hope that we are going 
to be able to move it all, but I think it 
is only fair to point out the facts, and to 
ask the public's cordial support. 

To Economize in Passenger Service 

As one step in that direction the War 
Board has asked the so-called Depart- 
mental Chairmen to call their com- 
mittees together at their various head- 
quarters throughout the United States 
to go over the passenger schedules of the 
fount ry most, carefully. There is a dupli- 
cation of passenger schedules in certain 



places. There is very luxurious pas- 
senger service, in some places and we 
would like to keep it up, but the country 
can get along without some of it. 

We are suggesting that there be some 
changes made in the passenger schedules, 
not with the idea of saving money, not 
with the idea of failing to serve the public, 
but simply to save man power, fuel and 
motive power, all of which should be applied 
to the transportation of necessities. 

This matter is so important that Con- 
gress has taken it up and there has been 
introduced in Congress, not at the sug- 
gestion of the railroads, but at the in- 
stance of members of that body, because 
they see the difficulty, a bill which will 
empower some agency of the Govern- 
ment, under the direction of the Presi- 
dent, to say to what commodities the 
railroads must give preference. That 
bill has been favorably reported by the 
Senate, and I presume is now on its 
passage. 

It is essential to the welfare of the 
people, and for the preservation of this 
great American railway system that 
some such measure be enacted. We 
have courageously started out to do 
these things that we have been asked 
to do by the Council of National Defense, 
and yet, in doing them we have of neces- 
sity run counter to some Federal laws 
and some State laws. Sooner or later 
we will have to stop in our efforts to get 
this maximum efficiency unless, as a war 
measure, the Federal power says, You 
must do this and you must do that, 
without being subjected to countless 
damage suits. 

How the Press Can Help 

*You gentlemen are all business men. 
I am going to ask you — and I know you 
want to — to help in any way you can. 
As you go back to your respective homes 
and write in your papers, you can perhaps 
give the public a clearer idea of this 
great movement to nationalize the rail- 
roads of the country as a war measure; 

'These remarki were made before the National Edi- 
torial Conference oi tin' Business Press, Washington, D. C, 
May 25, 1!)17. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



37 



you can arouse the public to a realization 
of the difficulties that confront the nation 
and that confront those of us in the rail- 
road service who are trying to serve the 
nation. You can emphasize the im- 
portance of the highest speed in every 
kind of preparation, and particularly in 
this transportation matter. 

We have the same difficulties that 
other manufacturers have, because we 
are only manufacturers of transporta- 
tion. That difficulty is to get all of our 
employes aroused to the seriousness of 
the situation. I think the railway em- 
ployes are as patriotic as any in the 
country, but they are far removed from 
the scene of trouble and they do not yet, 
as a whole, perhaps realize that every 
man, woman and child in the United 
States must do the maximum amount 
of work to win this war. 

You can help in that, because you 
touch many kinds of labor through your 
different papers, and you can encourage 
that idea; and you can also encourage the 
idea that if the railroads are to have their 
maximum efficiency they must have the 
help of every man outside of the railroads 
in handling equipment as well as the help 
of the men inside the railroads. 

You can help also, if it becomes neces- 
sary to bring about reductions in service, 
by the selection of the essential business as 
against the non-essential, to explain that 
that condition must be met with patience 
and with fortitude, and that if we are in 
this war to win, as we are, everyone must 
contribute something by getting along, 
perhaps, on a different basis of life from 
that to which he has been accustomed in 
the past ten luxurious years. 

Railroad Should Conserve Energies 

You can also help to increase the spirit 
of cooperation between the railroads 
and the State and National commissions, 
and municipal governments, as a war 



measure, to relieve the railroads from the 
strict regulation that cripples their effi- 
ciency. Those which will come up from 
time to time. They are being discussed 
before the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission, with Governors and others. 
I refer to measures which were thought 
to be wise when they were passed, but 
which, unconsciously, have had the 
effect of slowing down the operation of 
the railroads. 

If we have to pick and choose as to 
transportation, you can help by pointing 
out that unnecessary work, as a war 
measure, had better wait so that we can 
do the work necessary to win this war. 

I think there is a very large spirit of 
cooperation; it has been made evident 
to the War Board from many sources. 

We have had what I would term almost 
splendid cooperation, but it must be con- 
tinued and it must increase if we are to 
accomplish what the country wants and 
what you want. 

I firmly believe, in fact, no one can 
have any other feeling, that we will win 
this war, and I think we will all agree 
that we will win it sooner and end this 
awful struggle that is almost ruining 
civilization if everyone will realize the 
magnitude of the task and will turn in 
and mobilize and coordinate at once the 
marvelous man power, the money power, 
the business organization, the press, 
the manifold industries of this wonderful 
United States, and apply that mobilized 
power for the sole and only purpose of 
supporting our Allies and maintaining 
the highest ideals of humanity and 
civilization. 

That is what we, of the American 
railways, are trying to do through the 
platform we adopted, and through the 
War Board, which they selected and 
charged with this very high duty. 



Books That Will be of Assistance to the 
Man Who Expects to Render 
Military Service 



[MwiN the next few months a great 
[111 many of the men of America 
BSra i are g° m g to turn their thoughts 
SB P from the business of peace to the 
business of war. The man selected for 
service as a private need not remain a 
private— the chances for advancement will 
be as great in military as in civil life. 
To the man who wants to go into the 
military or naval service as well prepared 
as may be the reading of one or more of 
the following books is suggested. They 
will not teach him the trade of soldier- 
ing or sailoring, but they will give him a 
long start over the man who goes to the 
mobilization camp entirely ignorant of 
matters military, or aboard ship "with 
hay in his hair." The books may be pur- 
chased at almost any bookstore, or may 
be ordered direct from the publishers. 

The Plattsburg Manual, a Handbook for 
Military Training, by Captain 0. 0. Ellis, 
U. S. A., and Captain E. B. Garey, U. S. A. 
Published by The Century Co., New York. 
Price $2.00 net. 

"The first book for the citizen soldier 
to read," are the words with which 
the publishers introduce this valuable 
book. It is an elementary text-book 
of matters military, intended for those 
who desire to become officers of the 
J v cserve Corps and for ambitious men 
without military training who have been 
called to the colors. It will give the 
reader a sound conception of the basic 
principles of military art, which he may 
supplement by the study of more technical 
text-books. 

The first part deals with the problems 
of the "rookie." It gives advice on 
such subjects as what to take to camp, 
what to do on arrival there, rules of 



conduct for camp life, saluting, and the 
preliminary cleaning of the rifle and 
bayonet. A chapter — perhaps the most 
valuable in the book — is devoted to 
physical training before going to camp. 
Then the school of the soldier (including 
the manual of arms), the school of the 
squad and the school of the company are 
taken up, the text being made clear by 
diagrams and photographs showing the 
right, and quite as important, the 
wrong way of performing the various 
movements. 

Other subjects treated briefly and 
clearly are fire superiority, the service of 
security, attack and defense, target 
practice, and " hiking.' ' 

The second part, or supplement, treats 
the subjects introduced in the first part 
more fully and in a more technical 
manner. A valuable chapter is the one 
on first aid to the injured. The appendix 
contains the tables of organization of the 
Army and other reference data of value. 

Manual of Military Training. By Major 
James A. Moss, United States Army. Pub- 
lished by the George Banta Publishing Com- 
pany, Menasha, Wisconsin. Price $1.90 net. 

In its 700 pages this book covers 
every subject that the private, non- 
commissioned officer and company 
officer will need to be informed upon. 
It is divided into three parts. Part 
I deals with drills, exercises, guard 
duty, target practice, ceremonies and 
inspections. Part II deals with miscel- 
laneous subjects pertaining to company 
training and instruction and Part III to 
company field training. It is a book that 
will well repay the study of anyone enter- 
ing, or expecting to enter, the army, in 
any capacity. 



38 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



Fundamentals of Military Service. By 
Captain Lincoln C. Andrews, United States 
Cavalry. Prepared under the supervision of 
Major General Wood. Published by J. B. 
Lippincott Company, Philadelphia. Price 
$1.-50 net. 

In this valuable book Captain An- 
drews gives an outline of the work 
performed by all the various arms of 
the military service. The scope of 
the book can best be illustrated by a 
list of its chapter headings: Our 
Military Policy; Psychology of the Ser- 
vice; Military Training; Organization; 
Infantry Drill; Its Rules; Its Discipline; 
Cavalry; Its Role, Discipline, Leaders 
and Drill; Field Artillery; Coast Artillery; 
The Engineer Corps; The Signal Corps; 
Tactical Rules ; Military Courtesy ; Guard 
Duty; Riot Duty; Small Arms Firing; 
Map Reading and Sketching; Care of 
Arms and Equipment; Army Regula- 
tions; Patrolling; Security; Marches and 
Convoys: the care of Men and Horses; 
Camps and Bivouacs; Supply and Trans- 
portation; Sanitation; Horsemanship. 
The chapters on the psychology of the 
military service, military training, and 
organization are especially valuable to 
the man who has had no military ex- 
perience. 

Fundamentals of Naval Service, by Com- 
mander Yates Stirling, U. S. N. Published by 
J. B. Lippincott Company; price, $1.50 net. 

In this interesting book Commander 
Stirling does for our naval service what 
Captain Andrews has done for our mili- 
tary service — gives men intending to en- 
list in the 'Navy an idea of the various 
kinds of service demanded and of the 
principles underlying Naval customs. 
The book will also be of value to the 
civilian who desires to know something 
of the work of our Navy. 



Among the subjects treated in an in- 
teresting way are: Our Naval Policy; 
The Principles of Naval Strategy : Naval 
Traditions and Training; The Evolution 
of the Modern Warship; The Naval 
Aeroplane and Airship; The Mercantile 
Marine; and the Fleet in Battle against 
other Warships and against Land Forces. 
Part III of the book is devoted to the 
organization of the Navy; Part IV to the 
various branches of Naval Service and 
Part V to First Aid, the Navy as a Career, 
and like subjects. 

Like " Fundamentals of Military Ser- 
vice," this book will well repay the civi- 
lian for its reading. 



A Guide for Those Who Wish to 
Serve Their Country 

OR the information of the many 
patriotic Americans who are 
anxious to "do their bit" but 
who don't know just where 
they can best fit in, Columbia University 
has issued a "Directory of Service," 
which details the requirements for and 
duties of service in the active and 
reserve branches of the Army, Navy, 
Aviation, Medical, Red Cross, Agri- 
cultural and Industrial forces of the 
United States. It will prove equally 
valuable to the man who is thinking of 
enlisting for active service and to the 
equally patriotic man who must stay at 
home, but who wants to do what he can 
to help, in addition to performing his 
usual duties. A special chapter is devot- 
ed to woman's part in the war. 

This bulletin costs twenty cents and 
may be obtained by addressing the 
Secretary, Columbia University, New 
York City. 




40 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine 



'Robert M. Van Sant, Editor 
Arthur W. Grahamk, Associate Editor 

•Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist 
George B. Lucket, Staff Photographer 



"On furlough attending Officers' Reserve Corps Training Camp 



Helping to Win the War 



WHEN the call to the colors is 
sounded every man worthy of the 
name feels that it is sounded for 
him, and that, regardless of age 
or responsibilites, he must answer it or 
stand a self-convicted slacker. Yet, for 
various reasons, many must remain at 
home, and their part in the winning of 
the war is quite as important as is that 
of the soldiers and sailors who face the 
enemy on the battlefield and the high 
seas. 

War brings our normal, everyday ex- 
istences to an end; sometimes swiftly, 
often slowly and almost imperceptibly, 
but always surely. Our friends appear 
in unaccustomed uniforms for a day or 
two and are gone — into the great war 
machine and to the gamble of life or death. 
The change to them is swift and complete. 
To those who stay at home it is more 
gradual. The things that have interested 
us most gradually interest us no more, 
our usual amusements and pleasures 
grow "stale, flat and unprofitable." But. 
the business of the nation goes on, in- 



□ 



creases, and at last changes from the 
business of peace to the business of war, 
and we change from the workers of peace 
to the industrial soldiers of war. 

Success in modern war demands that 
behind the army and the navy there must 
stand another army, the army of industry. 
This army does not fight with sword and 
cannon — its weapons are the common 
implements of everyday life, the sledge 
and the anvil, the lathe and the drill press, 
the spade and the plow, the locomotive 
and the freight car, even the pen and the 
ledger. Yet that success shall reward 
the efforts of the men at the front this pro- 
saic army must toil and struggle as faith- 
fully and as self-sacrificingly as the men 
in the trenches. Denied the glamour of 
the uniform, often unrewarded by the 
praise of their fellow citizens, far away 
from the romance and the excitement of 
the battlefield, upon their loyalty depends 
victory or defeat. 

Of all the many industries that must 
play an important part in the conduct of 
the war there is none more vital than 
transportation. Not a gun can be forged, 
not a ship launched, not a soldier sent to 
the front, without the help of the rail- 
roads. Upon the transportation systems 
of the United States and upon the men 
who manage and run them rests, to a great 
extent, the responsibility for success or 
failure. The extent of this responsibility, 
the vital need for the whole-hearted help 
of every man in railroad service, is pointed 
out masterfully in Mr. Willard's address 
at the Deer Park meeting, published in 
this issue. It should be read by every 
Baltimore and Ohio employe. 

The men who are charged with the 
management of the railroads have done, 
and will continue to do, their part. For 
the purpose of helping to win the war 
the numerous systems of the nation have 
been merged into one, and rivalries and 
competition cast aside. But the employes 
of the railroads also have their duty and 



□ 



DON'T BE A SLACKER 

H □ : ' n " H"" n P ■' n 



□ 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



11 



their responsibility to the country. Al- 
though they may wear the uniform of any 
one of a hundred railroads they are, in 
reality, serving one great master — the 
Nation. They are the railroad soldiers 
of America, mobilized for the great battle 
for freedom and democracy, and upon 
their shoulders rests the responsibility 
of seeing that their comrades in the 
trenches, on the seas and in the training 
camps lack for nothing that they can 
bring them that will make for their wel- 
fare and success. 

Each man, in his particular position, 
is equally important. President, general 
manager, superintendent, trainmaster, 
dispatcher, yardmaster, signalman, oper- 
ator, engineer, trainman, switchman, 
surveyor, shopman, draftsman, trackman 
— each must do his duty, for if one fails 
all fail. Will this railroad army accom- 
plish its task? Will it prove itself worthy 
of the confidence reposed in it? To 
those who know the American railroad 
man there can be but one answer — yes! 
When the war is over and the Sammies 
come marching home the railroad men of 
America will have no reason to hide their 
faces — they will have done their bit. 



Keeping Fit 

|0, I haven't played much golf 
this year, somehow. We're work- 
ing pretty hard at the office just 
now — lot of fellows gone in the 
army, you know — so when I get home I 
sit around and read the papers and take 
it easy. Anyhow, I've sort of lost interest 
in golf and baseball and those things — 
don't know just why — it's the war, I guess. 
I can't go myself, and it doesn't seem quite 
right to be enjoying myself while other 

fellows are in the trenches 

No, I can't say that I feel very well — all 
sort of dragged out, like." 



Perhaps you have heard — or presented 
— excuses of this kind for not taking 
accustomed exercise. Many men can 
always find an excuse for not exercising — 
which is one of the reasons why so many 
doctors own automobiles — but in war- 
time this particular brand of 11 slacking" 
is exceptionally prevalent. 

And its dead wrong ! The war demands 
that every citizen be at his best. The 
burdens of everyday life will grow 
heavier and heavier and we should be in 
the best possible physical condition to 
bear them. Exercise and healthful 
amusement are as necessary as meat and 
drink — a good many pretty wise people 
think that we would be better with more 
exercise and less meat and drink — and it 
is the duty of every man to see that he 
gets as fit and keeps as fit as he possibly 
can. Thousands of medical men are 
needed at the front and those left at 
home will be busy with the sickness and 
disease that cannot be avoided. Don't 
add to their burden by falling ill because 
you don't take care of yourself. 

The President's cabinet members are 
pretty busy men these days, but they 
manage to spare enough time to undergo a 
course of training under Mr. Walter 
Camp, of Yale football fame, and Presi- 
dent Wilson himself, despite his duties 
and responsibilities, manages to find time 
for occasional rounds of golf and long 
automobile rides. It pays — try it and 
see if it doesn't. 



Magazine to be Increased in Size 

(EGINNING with the August 
number the Magazine will con- 
sist of ninety-six pages. It is 
hoped that with that amount of 
space it will be possible to cover, although 
in many cases very briefly, all the hap- 
penings of interest on our System. In 
recent issues it has been necessary to 
omit many interesting articles. 



"1^3"""""""' """!>i"ii"ii"it23 , """""" t;| "" " D| " ""£3' ° ' i^^J 1 """"""^"""""" ' iii"ijJ3"" 1 """" """' oNHHiimiiJJii 

HELP WIN THE WAR 



□ 



Teamwork as Important in the Army as 
on the Railroad 



Says Editor, Writing from the Officers' Reserve 
Corps Training Camp at Fort Myer 



Fort Myer, July 4, 1917. 

Dear Art.: 

A couple of weeks ago our Company got a 
real "find." It came in the person of Sergeant 
Martin J. Bresnahan, fresh from drilling 
recruits at Fortress Monroe and with an 
equally hard task before him in teaching pros- 
pective officers the manifold duties of a "top" 
sergeant. For this is no "cinch" even when, as 
with us, the pupils want to learn. In fact, after 
two weeks of the preparation of muster rolls, 
morning reports, ration returns, council books, 
document files, payrolls, etc., we are all willing 
to agree with our refreshing instructor that the 
importance of the job of "top" sergeant is 
quite impossible to exaggerate. 

I said Sergeant B. was refreshing. He's 
more than that. He has been a U. S. Regular 
for seventeen years and sees things not only 
from the angle of the "non-com," which he is, 
and the officer, which he is about to become, 
but also from the viewpoint of the enlisted man 
that he was when he started his service. And 
the inside dope which he has confided about 



the handling of our future charges, and which 
can't be found in "Army Regulations," ought 
to prove invaluable to those of us who have the 
good sense and the tact to use it. 

"Private O'Brien" is Sergeant Bresnahan's 
prime favorite. • He is a wholly imaginary 
person who officiates at all the Sergeant's 
lectures, where he fills the role of a veritable 
Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. One minute he is an 
extremely well-behaved first class private in 
charge of an important detail and the next he 
is the horrible example of the refractory recruit 
undergoing punishment in the guard house. 
However, as you might suppose from the racial 
connection between the names "Bresnahan" 
and "O'Brien," our instructor usually speaks 
of his illustration as a "first class fighting 
man." 

(I wish those misguided Irish-Americans, 
who seem to think that Germany would do 
better by the Emerald Isle than has Great 
Britain, would come down to Fort Myer and 
listen to some plain talk from Bresnahan. He 
hasn't much respect for the Kaiser.) 




THE SOLDIER MUST KNOW WHERE HE IS— AND WHERE THE ENEMY IS LIKELY TO BE 

These candidates for com missions in the National Army are using the time of a halt 
on a practice march lo become familiar with the art of reading military maps 



42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



43 



What he thinks of us may be judged from the 
fact that he was recently heard offering to bet 
the sergeant instructor of another company a 
month's pay that "my company," as he calls 
us, could outdrill any other in the regiment in 
parade and close order formations. Naturally 
we work to the limit when he is on the drill 
ground, putting a lot of "kick" into our steps 
with his incisive and inspiring "Wan-Two- 
Three-Foor— Wan-Two-Three-Foor , ' ' etc . 

But the long, tiring drills in close order 
formation, the importance of which, for teach- 
ing precision, uniformity, exactness, quickness 
of response, etc., can hardly be exaggerated, 
are now a thing of the past and we have been 
working on the secondary part of our training. 
So that the mornings nowadays, not long 
after sun up, see us out on the country roads or 
fields doing a variety of things. 

Perhaps the most interesting work on the 
present schedule is that under the heading, 
"Studies in Minor Tactics." In these we go 
out on our hikes in marching formation, some- 
times, as companies acting independently, 
sometimes as parts of a battalion or of the whole 
regiment, and again as detachments of imagi- 
nary brigades or divisions who are supposed to 
be defending the National Capital against 
attack or protecting the Arlington Wireless 
Station. 

This latter, by the way, with its three huge 
steel towers and connecting antennae looming 
high over us about a half mile below our 
regimental street, is the most important of all 
the stations of communication of the Govern- 
ment. Often of a morning the tops of the masts 
are shrouded in clouds and it is fascinating 
to think that from these steel monsters, 
through clouds and storm, across land and sea, 
by day and by night, messages of the greatest 
import are being sent to our fleets and armies 
on home and foreign seas and soil, to San 
Diego, to Panama, to Honolulu, from what 
has now unquestionably become the world's 
center of democracy at Washington. 

Electrically charged barbed wire surrounds 
this station, with a big detachment of the 
National Guard of the District of Columbia 
constantly on the watch for enemies who would 
destroy it. This is a far from romantic or 
fascinating duty, rather more so however than 
are the duties of thousands of other militiamen 
who, day in and day out, often in most 
unpleasant places, are protecting the vast 
machinery of the Government whose first 
soldiers have just reached fighting soil. More 
honor, therefore, to the fellows at home who 
are doing their "bit" modestly, faithfully and 
effectively! 

These practice marches are almost always 
good sport. Morning in the country about Fort 
Myer is delightful, the flowers abundant, the 
roads good, and the farms showing by their 
wonderful growth of fruits, vegetables and 
grain, the good effects already obtained by the 
country- wide drive for greater production. 
Of course, wading through mud holes made by 
an all night's rain isn't the pleasantest thing in 
the world, nor is lying prone in a swampy field. 



But for all these minor hardships we have the 
inestimable satisfaction of knowing that with- 
out them we cannot learn and that they are not 
multiplied simply for the sake of making it 
miserable for us. The accompanying picture is 
rather a poor one to illustrate this phase of 
our tactical work. It was taken during a brief 
rest, called for the sending out of a "flanking 
combat patrol to drive off patrols of the 
enemy." You will note that the men are all 
studying their maps (this is not a posed picture) 
by means of which our marches are exclusively 
directed. By the way, I have learned enough 
of this part of the work to be able, with a small 
rectangular board, compass, ruler scale, paper 
and pencil, to draw a map which passes muster 
before our Major of Engineers as "a good 
rough sketch." 

If I had a picture of my sorely blistered hands 
of a few days ago it would be the best proof in 
the world that I have had my share of trench 
digging. This is really a remarkably simple 
operation and requires more brawn than 
brains. Yet even here and in the ghastly 
stretching of the barbed wire entanglements, 
there is, of course, only one best way of doing 
it. And we have learned that. Our sole enemy 
to date, by the way, has been a very slippery 
and scared weasel, who in scampering over the 
intrenchment ridge, caused so unseemly an 
amount of stone throwing and chasing with 
picks and shovels by our "soldiers," that the 
Company looked for the moment as if it was 
in a bad rout. 

One of «the pleasant surprises of the past week 
for me was a chance meeting with "Jimmy" 
Hare, the famous war photographer. I first 
met him when he was the official photographer 
for Collier's in New York. He has been back 
from the firing lines only a short time and at 
Fort Myer was completing a tour of the Train- 
ing Camps which had taken him as far west as 
the Presidio in San Francisco. He looked 
over the work we had been doing on trenches 
and entanglements, gave it his O. K. as being 
in line with the practice which actually obtains 
in the first line trenches in France, and took 
some pictures of our squad busy with picks and 
shovels. 

Well, as usual, I've skimped on what I wanted 
to write and written only a few of the things I 
intended to. I wish (harking back to the days 
when I was preaching in the Magazine the good 
old doctrine of "teamwork" on the railroad) 
I could tell you how they are hammering it 
into us here. It's an eye opener, the most 
important thing in the military game, but I'll 
have to save it until my next. 

By the way, isn't it great that the military 
cantonments at Admiral and Chillicothe are on 
our lines! When reading of the thousands of 
carloads of material needed to build each camp, 
I couldn't help but think how much business it 
will mean for the Baltimore and Ohio, and 
how hard our employes will try to handle it 
safely and expeditiously. - 

With my best, as ever, 

Robert M. Van Sant. 



How Women Can Fight 

By Gelett Burgess 

of the Vigilantes 



must wait to be drafted, but 
any woman can volunteer in this 
war. Every woman should. An 
Army of Women is enlisting re- 
cruits. Its name is the American Red 
Cross, and to care for the wounded is its 
mission. 

Don't think, however, that means that 
you can put on a becoming uniform, and, 
after a few lessons, go to France and 
nurse heroes in hospitals. Would you, 
if you were ill, want to be cared for by 
an amateur? No, you would want a 
trained nurse who has graduated from a 
hospital that would guarantee her char- 
acter and efficiency. Don't you want 
your boy, if he is wounded, to have the 
very best care in the world? 

Both in England and in France many 
auxiliary hospitals were at first filled 
with amateur nurses. Men were ne- 
glected, ill cared for. The bed sores 
alone were terrible — all caused merely 
by the lack of experience of the nurses. 

To avoid such horrors, the American 
Red Cross has enlisted thousands of 
graduate nurses, women efficient, ex- 
perienced and conscientious and so 
scientifically trained that the surgeon's 
work is made effective. It has formed 
and prepared thirty base hospital staffs — 
with surgeons, nurses, orderlies, dieti- 
cians, clerks and housekeepers and me- 
chanics — enough adequately to provide 
medical care for an army of a million 
men. 

It is the work of the women of the land 
to help keep these hospitals alive. You 
must do your share that our soldiers may 
be cared for. Join the Red Cross today. 
Apply at the nearest Chapter or Branch. 
They will tell you what to do. Get nine 
other women and form an Auxiliary, and 
I he Red ( 'mss will send you an instructor. 

There are two things the Red Cross 



wants, and wants quickly — money and 
surgical dressings. Both are vitally 
necessary to keep the hospitals going. 

Of an army in the field, it is estimated 
that at least five per cent, will, during 
the first part of the campaign, be in the 
hospital. For our 50,000 ill and wound- 
ed, an immense number of surgical dress- 
ings will be needed. They must be all 
ready. They must be all exactly alike. 
They must be scientifically made. 

Send to the Headquarters at Wash- 
ington for the Red Cross " Circular on 
Surgical Dressings," then start a work- 
shop and go to work. Let the nearest 
Chapter tell you all the details — don't 
bother Headquarters with questions! Or, 
join some branch already established. 
There is enough work for every woman 
in the United States. 

If you can't do this, raise money for 
the Red Cross. Think of the sums re- 
quired for hospital equipment — cots, 
bedding, garments, kitchens, medicines! 
To equip the six base hospitals already 
sent to France cost $210,000 and for 
the nurses' equipment another $23,000. 

Fairs, entertainments, collections — 
there are as many ways to raise money 
as there are persons to do it. 

But remember that, once you enlist, 
the Red Cross is a sacred symbol, and 
don't misuse it or treat it lightly. It 
stands for the highest work women can 
do in this crisis. It stands for respon- 
sible, organized, and scientifically trained 
and directed work for the relief of hu- 
manity. It is above distinctions of 
race. Amid the world-wide cruelty and 
horror of war, the Red Cross is the em- 
blem of unselfishness and of the Brother- 
hood of Man. 

Is there any woman living who will 
not want to fight under such a flag as 
that? 



44 



Home Dressmaker's Corner 



A Skirt for the Summer Wardrobe Developed Upon Lines 
Both Simple and Satisfactory 

Courtesy of "Pictorial Review" 



T""~|HIS tub skirt in cotton rep is 
simple, smart and satisfactory. 
SjflS ^ ne nome dressmaker will find it 
P aBl n i exceedingly easy to make and as 
cotton rep is one of the inexpensive 
materials characterized by unusual ex- 
cellence of appearance, the cost of the 
skirt occasions no obstacle to its pos- 
session. It is a two-piece model in 
circular effect and, if preferred, may be 
made without the pockets and trim- 
ming straps shown in the illustration. 
Medium size requires 3 yards 43 inch or 
33^ j^ards 36-inch material. 

Since cotton rep usually comes in 
narrow widths, it will be necessary to 
piece the front and back gores. Place 
the pattern on the lengthwise fold of 
material as shown in the cutting guide. 
Pin down carefully, then sew a strip of 
rep to the sides to make the material 
wide enough to fully accommodate the 
pattern . 

Of course, if serge, or any other wider 
material be used, piecing will not be 
necessary. Both the front and back 
gores are laid on the lengthwise fold of 
material. The belt sections are laid 
parallel with the selvage, while the pocket 
has the large "0" perforations resting on 
a lengthwise thread. Place the strap 
with edge marked by single "T" on a 
lengthwise thread of material. 

Now, having cut each section carefully, 
join the gores as notched, leaving left 
side seam free above large "O" per- 
foration in front gore for a placket. 
Gather the upper edge between "T" 
perforations and adjust stay to position, 



underneath skirt with single large "0" 
perforation at top of stay at center- 
back of skirt, double small "00" per- 
foration at center-front and bring single 
small "o" perforation in stay to right side 
seam of skirt ; close stay on left side. Stitch 
upper edges of skirt and stay together, 




TWO-PIECE SKIRT 



45 



46 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



CUTTING GUIDE T2 86 



FOLD OP 54 INCH MATERIAL WITH NAP 



drawing gathers to 
fit stay. If desired 
to be worn with a 
shirtwaist, a stay 1 
inch wide may be 
used instead of the 
25 inch stay provided 
in pattern, cutting 
off 1 inch from up- 
per edges of gores. 

The large "O" perforations in the 
pocket indicate the front. Adjust to 
position on skirt with the outer edges 
along indicating small "o" perforations. 

Now, lap the front belt section on the 
back, matching small "o" perforations 
and finish with buttons and buttonholes 
for closing. Adjust to position on skirt 
with center-fronts and center-backs even, 
upper edge of belt a little above top of 
skirt; the belt may be arranged over, or 
under the top of strap as illustrated. 

Trim with buttons or braid. 

No. 7286. Ladies' Skirt. Sizes, 24 to 34 
inches waist. Price, 20 cents. 



26 





STRAP 








Who VlJ 


<^ G 




\ FRONT GORE. 




BACK GORE 




T T T 




TT T 





Patented April 30, 190/ 



CONSTRUCTION GUIDE. 7286 

3-THE. WHOLE. 




mum*!* 



Practical Economy 

Saves for You and for "Uncle Sam" 

(Sign or have your wife, mother or sister sign) „ 

I, _ , hereby resolve to live up to the 

following pledge to the best of my ability, and to urge all persons within my influence 
to do the same. 

1. To serve no meals with more than three courses, fresh meat and potatoes to be 
used only once a day. 

2. To observe one meatless day every week. 

3. To urge housekeepers to go to market and pay cash, when possible, and keep 
a closer supervision of the kitchen. 

4. To plan menus scientifically, serving smaller portions of food. Rice and maca- 
roni suggested as substitutes for potatoes, and fish for meat when practical. Whole 
wheat, rye and com bread to be used, when possible, in place of white bread. No un- 
seasonable fruits or vegetables to be purchased. 

5. To preserve at least one dozen jars of fruits and one dozen jars of vegetables 
during the season. 

6. To be as careful as possible in purchasing clothes, and to avoid clothes fads 
and constant changes in fashions. 

The purpose of this pledge is to save food for our allies and to conserve our 
national resources. 

Name,.._ 

Permanent Address, 

The Baltimohe and Ohio IOmployes Magazine. 

Sign and send to Herbert C. Hoover, Food Director, 18th and F Streets, 
N. W., Washington, D. C. 



^i^CIALy MERIT R.OL/L/ 



Staten Island Division 

On the night of June 14 a Ford car was stolen 
from Joseph Gurlick & Son, florists, of 
Hoboken, N. J. 

At about 2.00 a. m. this automobile drew up 
to our Tompkinsville freight yard and the 
occupants stole a reel of copper wire, valued 
at $1,000, from the freight shed. 

The East Shore Drill, in charge of conductor 
B. H. Bardes, was working in Tompkinsville 
yard and saw the automobile stuck in the 
mud in the yard. Mr. Bardes and trainman 
R. Boerum walked over to the car and saw a 
reel of copper wire in the machine. They 
thought this suspicious. Mr. Bardes then 
went to the Freight Station to notify the 
police officials, while Mr. Boerum engaged the 
men in conversation. 

The occupants of the car became sus- 
picious; unloaded the reel of copper wire, and 
made their get-a-way. 

Conductor Bardes, notified the Police Depart- 
ment and gave them the number of the car, 
which they succeeded in catching while at- 
tempting to cross Carteret Ferry into New 
Jersey. 

But for the quick action of Mr. Bardes in 
telephoning the police, and of Mr. Boerum in 
engaging the thieves in conversation, in all 
probability they would have escaped with the 
reel of copper wire. 

Credit entries hrve been made on the records 
of both Mr. Bardes and Mr. Boerum. 

Captain E. G. Clarke, of the tug "Cowen," 
discovered a fire on Coal Pier L, St. George, 
on the afternoon of June 5. The "Cowen" 
played a stream of water on the fire and soon 
extinguished it. Captain Clarke is commended 
for his keen observation and prompt action. 

On June 3 a car on track 18, St. George Yard, 
was discovered to be afire by A. J. Volpi, 
assistant yardmaster. Mr. Volpi, assisted by 
patrolman W. Lemmer, threw several pails 
of water on the fire and extinguished it. Both 
are commended for their prompt action. 



Philadelphia Division 

On May 15 engineer J. A. Ward, while passing 
Bradshaw early in the morning, discovered 
that the waiting shed was afire. He brought 
his train to a stop, sent oat flag and extinguished 
the flames before they had done much damage. 
A credit entry has been placed on his service 
record. 

Baltimore Division 

While train No. 91 was passing Dorsey, Md., 
on June 12, foreman J. A. Selvey discovered a 
defective condition of equipment on one of the 
cars. He could not stop the train but notified 
the agent at Jessups, who flagged it and had 
the condition corrected. 

Cumberland Division 

On the morning of June 15 conductor J. P. 
Kearns found evidence of a defective condition 
on a preceding train near 76 Fill, on the Cheat 
River grade. Mr. Kearns telephoned news of 
his discovery and extra east 7204, then at M. & 
K. Junction, was examined and a defective 
condition found on one of the cars, which was 
set off for repairs. A credit entry has been 
placed upon Mr. Kearns' record. 

On June 13 brakeman R. P. Thompson, with 
extra 7211, discovered a defective condition on 
our car 124749, at Terra Alta. A credit entry 
has been placed on his service record. 



On April 18 sec- 
tion foreman H. C. 
Snyder, of Great 
Cacapon, discovered 
a defective condi- 
tion on a car in 
train of engine 4838. 
He stopped the train 
and assisted the con- 
ductor to back the 




car on a siding. h. C. SNYDER 



48 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Wheeling Division 

Fireman H. M. Stewart, with extra east 4019 
recently discovered a defective track con- 
dition and immediately notified engineer 
Griffith, who made arrangements to flag 
approaching trains. Both gentlemen have 
been commended. 

On June 2 Mr. Thomas Carvo, of Hastings, 
W. Va., discovered a defect on car passing 
through Jacksonburg in train of extra 2224. 
He immediately had the train stopped. 

On June 1 John Stelle discovered a defective 
condition in track west of Jacksonburg, and 
immediately reported it to section foreman. 
He has been commended. 

Cleveland Division 

On June 2 brakeman H. C. Haines discovered 
a defective condition on a car in train of engine 
4190, at Grafton, Ohio. He reported the mat- 
ter to the conductor and the car was set off. 



While working on engine 337 in Dover Yard 
on May 2 conductor M. Reidy and brakeman 
A. E. Ross discovered some of the ties in River 
Bridge afire. They extinguished the fire 
before any damage was done. 

While at Freeport on May 29 pumper S. W. 
Nash called Piedmont on the telephone and 
reported that he had discovered evidence of a 
defect in a train that had passed. Upon re- 
ceiving this information conductor Hicks, of 
extra 4190, made an inspection of his train and 
discovered a defective condition on one of the 
cars. The car was set off at Dover. 

On May 24 conductor B. S. Willmot had a 
large shipment of fresh meat for Medina, O., 
which would have been delayed for some hours 
because of an accident to a preceding train 
had he not notified the dispatcher's office and 
suggested that he be given permission to take 
the meat to Medina. He has been commended 
by the superintendent and has also received a 
letter of thanks from The G. H. Hammond 
Co., of Chicago, the shippers. 



Special Service Rendered by Cumberland Division Operators 
During Month of May 



Date 



Name 



Location 



Irregularity Noted 



May 2 E. 

May 2 I E. 

May 3 R. 

May 4 H. 

May 6 J. 

May 6 B. 

May 7 C. 

May 8 A. 

May 8 I B. 

May 9 J. 

May 12 C. 

May 12 S. 

May 13 J. 

May 15 V. 

May 16 1 V. 

May 16 E. 

May 17 J. 

May 10 J. 

May 20 J. 

May 21 B. 

May 25 K. 

May 30 J. 

May 31 J. 

May 31 B. 

May 31 V. 



H. Gross 

H. Gross 

L. Sebold. . . . 

R. Hood 

L. Schroder. . . 

Moser 

H. Lovenstine 

C. Hardy 

Moser 

L. Schroder. . . 

C. McAtee. . . 
E. Schroder. . 
L. Schroder. . . 

D. Twigg.'. . . 

D. Twigg 

II. Gross 

R. Murphy. . . . 
L. Schroder. . . 
L. Schroder. . . 

Moser 

T. McKenzie. 
L. Schroder, . . 

L. Schroder. . . 

Moser 

D. Twigg 



Okonoko Equipment. 

Okonoko 
Oakland . 

Sleepy Creek 1 

Martinsburg | Shifted load 

Little Cacapon Equipment. 

Piedmont [ 

Okonoko 

Little Cacapon J " 

Martinsburg. . . 
Great Cacapon 

Hancock 

Martinsburg. . . 
Green Spring. . 
Green Spring. 

Okonoko 

Oakland I 

Martinsburg Shifted load 

Martinsburg Equipment. 

Little Cacapon I " 

Strickers '■ " 

Martinsburg 11 

Martinsburg " 

Okonoko 

(ireen Spring 



Defective (rack condition. 
Equipment. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



49 



t» — 
If 

)\ 
)\ 

w 



CF. BAILIE, our agent at Owaneca, 111., on the Illinois Division, recently saved 
• the life of Nellie Watkins, the' two year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob 
Watkins, of that place. 

Mr. Bailie saw the child on the track near our station, directly in front of extra 
west No. 100. He rushed to her aid, picked her up and fell backward with her in 
his arms, the locomotive missing striking them by a hair's breadth. 
Mr. Bailie is most highly commended for his gallant action. 



IT 

\\ 

u 

II 
!! 
11 



Connellsville Division 

Superintendent Broughton has written to 
chief of police J. H. Horner, of Ferndale Bor- 
ough, Pa., thanking him for removing an ob- 
struction from our tracks near Stony Creek on 
April 23. A lady who notified Mr. Horner of 
the obstruction also has our hearty thanks. 

Pittsburgh Division 

Foreman Felix Murdolo recently discovered a 
defective track condition west of Broad Ford. 
He placed a flagman to protect the track and 
made repairs in time for train No. 16, which 
was due in ten minutes, to go through without 
delay. He is highly commended. 

While a freight train was passing Point Mills 
recently Miss C. C. Ward noticed that the doors 
of a gondola loaded with coal were open and 
that the coal was dropping out. She at once 
notified the crew. 

Operator F. S. Zeigler recently noticed a 
defective condition on an engine passing Bakers- 
town Tower He notified the engineer. He is 
commended. 

Glenwood Shops 

On May 23 H. J. Meinert, foreman at Mill- 
vale, noticed a passing freight car to be in a 
defective condition, which allowed its loading 
of coal to leak out. He notified New Castle 
Junction, where repairs were made. He is 
commended. 

New Castle Division 

Mr. John E. Whitstone, of Niles, O., while on 
his way to work recently, noticed a defective 
track condition on the Old Main Line near his 
home, which he immediately reported and 
protected until it could be repaired. Mr. 



Whitstone will be remembered by many, he 
having been employed at DeForest Junction 
by this Company for some years and was a 
faithful employe. 

On June 5 F. L. Milburn, operator at OD 
Tower, Lodi, noticed a defective condition on 
car in train of extra east 4090, which he promptly 
reported. It was reported to the crew at the 
next telegrapn office, and corrected. A credit 
entry has been placed on his service record. 

On June 5 O. B. Shannon, agent at Creston. 
O., noticed a defective condition on train No. 
13, which he reported, and which was corrected 
at the next telegraph station. A credit entry 
has been placed on his service record. 

Conductor W. A. Cavany, in charge of local 
east, while at Greenwich on June 5, noticed a 
defective condition on a car in train of second 
94. He at once reported to the dispatcher, and 
the condition was corrected at the next tele- 
graph office. A credit entry has been placed 
on his service record. 

Chicago Division 

While going to work on May 31 operator 
F. M. Thornton, working at St. Joe, Ind., dis- 
covered a defective condition of signal equip- 
ment. He corrected it and has been com- 
mended. 

On June 12, as train No. 8 started to pull out 
of North Baltimore on the eastbound track and 
train No. 97 was approaching on the westbound 
main track at high speed, the seven year old 
daughter of M. Roberts, owner of a drug store 
at North Baltimore, O., attempted to cross 
the tracks, directly in fromt of No. 97, which 
she failed to notice. Crossing watchman 
Charles Ramsey, at great risk of losing his own 
life, pulled the child to safety. We understand 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



that this is not the first time that Mr. Ramsey 
has been instrumental in saving the lives of 
pedestrians, but this is the first case that has 
come to our at tention. Superintendent Jackson 
has written to Mr. Ramsey, congratulating 
him on his gallant act. We are certainly proud 
to know that we have such a brave and alert 
man at our North Baltimore crossing. 



South Chicago 

E. Bukowski, machinist, and John Rut kow ski, 
air brakeman, are commended for their prompt 
action in discovering and extinguishing a fire 
on the west end of Eighty-eighth Street viaduct 
over our South Chicago train yard, on June 11, 
preventing possible serious damage. 



□ Z : '» 

□ -■■ 



<□ □ 



Troop Trains Handled over the Baltimore and Ohio 

July 1, 1916, to July 1, 1917 



DIVISION 


JULY 


AUG. 


SEPT. 


OCT. 


NOV. 


DEC. 


JAN. 


FEB. 


MAR. 


APR. 


MAY 


JUNE TOTAI 


Philadelphia .. 


. 23 




6 




1 


2 






18 


8 


5 


7 


70 


Baltimore . . . 


. 41 




12 


3 


4 


5 




3 


39 


6 


9 


18 


140 


Cumberland. . 


. 24 




9 


3 


2 


3 






4 


8 


3 


13 


70 


Connellsville . 


9 




4 


1 












6 


1 




21 


Pittsburgh . . . 


7 




2 


1 






2 






4 


2 





18 


New Castle . . 


. 2 




1 












1 


2 


2 


1 


9 


Chicago 


10 


7 










1 




2 


3 


3 


2 


29 


Monongah . . . 


. 23 




2 


3 




2 




3 


- 3 


1 




3 


40 


Ohio River . . 


















1 


2 






3 


Wheeling .... 
























2 


3 


Newark 


2 


2 


3 




1 




2 


2 


1 


3 


5 


7 


28 


Cleveland . . . 


















2 


1 




1' 


4 


Ohio 


31 


4 


7 


4 


3 


4 




3 


4 


4 


6 


13 


83 


Indiana 


27 


3 


3 


4 


3 


2 


2 


2 


1 


3 


8 


13 


71 


Illinois 


21 


3 


2 


4 




2 


1 






3 


8 


11 


55 


Total .... 


220 


19 


51 


23 


14 


20 


8 


15 


76 


54 


53 


91 


644 



I □ j AMONG OURSELVES : □ | 

l } o( [ l j j ■ n c I 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



General Superintendent Motive Power's 
Office 

Correspondent, G. F. Patten 

E. B. Green, formerly file clerk in this office, 
is now employed as an electric welder at Mount 
Clare shops. We wish him success in his new 
field. 

J. M. Crac aft, alias "Jimmie," formerly 
assistant chie. clerk in the district superin- 
tendent of motive power's office at Wheeling, 
has succeeded Mr. Green, and from what 
"Jimmie" says the filing system of this office 
will be as complete as a telephone system. 
We wish you success, "Jimmie." 

The earnest efforts of Doctor Parlett, chief 
of the Welfare Bureau, to organize a Building 
Baseball League, have created much enthusiasm 
among the boys of this office. On the day that 
it was decided to have a team to represent 
this department sufficient funds were donated 
to purchase uniforms and equipment. We 
desire to thank, through the Magazine, those 
contributing, for their hearty cooperation. 
The team will consist of the following players: 
G. F. Patten, B. C. Tracey, M. J. Waters, 
F. J. Mueller, E. W. Powers, E. W. Lannon, 
L. W. Fowler, E. H. Freeman, W. T. Fritzges, 
D. H. Hicks, J. D. Dobson, J. F. Ball and T. E. 
Grindell; W. M. Clardy will act as umpire. 

The team will be handled by Captain Freeman 
and managed by G. F. Patten, with W. H. 
Gordon, Sr., as "Grand Advisor." 



R. E. Buchannan, secretary to the superin- 
tendent of the Passenger Car Department, has 
taken unto himself a wife, a young woman 
formerly of Reading, Pa. 

Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

W. D. White and H. M. Van Buskirk, both of 
this office, have joined Battery A, Maryland 
Field Artillery. They have been in training 
for some time and expect to be mustered in 
about July 25. Good luck, boys. 

In response to the circular dated May 31, 
outlining the terms upon which Liberty Bonds 
could be purchased by employes, nineteen of 
our clerks stepped out and had their names 
placed on the "Roll of Honor." Many others 
have purchased bonds through other sources. 

Just as we thought. That bunch of ball 
players representing the single men of this 
office failed to appear for the annual game on 
Decoration Day, and, as a result, the married 
men, by reason of having the largest number 
of players ready to take the field, claim the 
game, and this year's championship, by forfeit. 
Of course, we do not say that the bachelors got 
cold feet, but the circumstances seem a bit 
shady. 

Auditor Passenger Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, George Eichner 

Stopping work at 1.00 p. m. on Saturday, 
May 19, on the eleventh floor of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Building, and resuming activities 

51 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



at 8.30 a. m. on Monday, May 21, on the 
eleventh floor of the Lexington Street Build- 
ing, is the experience of one hundred and 
twenty-four clerks of the auditor of passenger 
receipts' office, which outgrew its space in the 
Baltimore and Ohio Building. The feat of 
transferring the office equipment in such a short 
time shows what may be accomplished by 
efficient organization. 

Another clerk has heeded the call to the 
colors and as a result J. Frank McMahon is 
wearing navy blue, having joined the Maryland 
Naval Militia. Another fellow clerk, E. J. 
Cook, is waiting to be called. He is a member 
of the Hospital Corps of the First Regiment. 

Former clerk G. J. Burns paid us a visit 
recently, while on a leave of absence. He is 
wearing the insignia of a second class yeoman, 
L T nited States Navy. 

Miss Arno Rogers, daughter of Andrew 
Rogers of this office, has arrived safely in 
France. Miss Rogers was a nurse at Johns 
Hopkins Hospital and when volunteers were 
called for service in France she enlisted in the 
Hopkins unit. 

In response to the appeal for vacationists to 
cooperate in the cause of "Food Preparedness," 
Robert Machin of this office spent his vacation 
working on the big farm of Mr. Thomas Patti- 
son, near Savage, .Md. 

Fighting the fruit tree enemy, "the scale," 
feeding live stock and assisting in the prepara- 
tion of the fields for great crops of corn and 
potatoes were part of his activities. 

Our farmer-clerk remembered his associates 



by sending them some eggs and honey, and 
returned feeling the better for the hard work 
and early hours which farm life demands. 

Auditor Freight Claims' Office 

Correspondent, H. Irving Martin 

Our good friend and former ball player, 
"Billy" Sunday, says that it is good for one's 
nerves to attend a ball game. Those of us who 
have seen the lightning transformation of a 
mass of somnolent bleacherites into an army 
of howling maniacs might answer — "That just 
depends." 

It , is the element of uncertainty and the 
possible quickening of heart action that makes 
the game so interesting to the baseball fan. 

Some of the games between the Freight Claim 
Department team and other teams of the 
Industrial League of Baltimore have been 
marked by hair-raising episodes calculated to 
bring all the rooters to their feet. 

The sensational fielding of Fink, Brubaker 
and Ittner in the game with the Standard Oil 
team on June 2, saved the day for the Freight 
Claim Department. 

The Freight Claim Department team recently 
became a member of the Industrial League of 
Baltimore, and at this writing leads the league. 

Recent games in this organization have 
resulted in the following victories for the 
Claim analysts: JVIay 19 with Carr-Lowry 
Glass Company, score 13-5; May 26 with 
Davison Chemical Company, score 7-6; 
June 2 with Standard Oil Company, score 6-5; 
June 9 with Carr-Lowry Glass Company, 
score 7-2. 

One defeat is recorded, the game with the 
Standard Oil team on May 12. 




I HE FAMILY OF J. r. GRIMACE, PORTER IN THE OFFICE OF VICE PRESIDENT J. M. DAVIS 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



53 




We realize that what "Billy" Sunday meant 
about nerves was that it did anyone good to 
get away from business routine and get in 
touch with clean, manly sport. 

Others from the Freight Claim Department 
who have volunteered to serve their country 
on land or sea, are: F. W. Klos and F. J.Tawney, 
in the Fifth Maryland Regiment; R. B. Walker, 
in the Officers' Training Camp at Fort Myer; 
R. P. Battee, in the Marine Corps; Archie A. 
Pope in the Navy Hospital Service, at Newport, 
R. I., and L. G. Egan, in the Norfolk Navy 
Yard. 

May all of our boys give a good account of 
themselves and return with many honors and 
medals. 

Relief Department 

Correspondent, W. H. Ball, Secretary to 
Superintendent 

On May 1 the late Dr. Joseph F. Tearney 
voluntarily retired as chief medical examiner 
of the Relief Department, because of ill-health. 

Effective the same date, Dr. E. V. Mil- 
holland, of Baltimore, was promoted to succeed 
him as chief medical examiner. 

W. J. Dudley, formerly special accountant, 
was appointed assistant superintendent of the 
Relief Department, in charge of the Relief and 
Pension Features. 

Dr. R. D. Sykes, formerly medical examiner 
at Cleveland, was promoted to the position of 
assistant chief medical examiner. 

W. M. Kennedy is the assistant superin- 
tendent of the Relief Department in charge of 
the Savings Feature. 

General Offices 

The accompanying picture is of Charles M. 
Heany, superintendent of our big headquarters 
building. 

Mr. Heany entered the service as an elevator 
machinist in the Building on September 10, 
1906. He was promoted to engineer in charge 
on June 1, 1909, to chief engineer on March 1, 
1913, and to superintendent of building on 
September 1, 1916. 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, Fred B. Kohler, Clerk 
Pier 22 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. B. Biggs Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. Michelson Terminal Cashier 

J. J. Bayer Freight Agent, Pier 22, N. R. 

J. T. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. Kavanaugh , Freight Agent, 26th Street 

T. F. Gorman Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M. F. Steinberger. . . .Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

C. E. Floom Freight Agent, St. George Transfer 

E. J. Kehoe Freight Agent, Pier 4, Wallabout 

Marine Department Members 
Permanent 

E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 

E. J. Kelly Assistant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 

E. Salisbury Lighterage Supervisor 



CHARLES M. HEANY 
Superintendent of the Baltimore and Ohio Building 



Rotating Members (appointed for three months) 

C. H. Kearney Tugboat Captain 

W. Cornell Tugboat Engineer 

W. Meade Tugboat Fireman 

M. Y. Groff Lighterage Runner 

E. Sodeberg Barge Captain 

Otto Olsen Gas Hoist Captain 

H. Peterson Steam Hoist Captain 

J. Hall Steam Hoist Engineer 

Walter Kelly Deckhand 



The employes of the New York Terminal 
have organized a social, athletic, and welfare 
association to be called the New York Ter- 
minal Association. At a meeting held at Pier 22, 
on June 7, the following officers were elected.' 
president, Adam Scheck; vice-president, J. 
Hamilton; secretary, J. W. Olson, and treasurer, 
F. W. Nelson. 

It is the desire of this organization to pro- 
mote and foster good fellowship among our 
employes, with a view to taking part in the 
various branches of athletics as approved by 
the management and during the winter months 
to provide social and educational features. 

We extend to all employes our heartiest 
invitation to attend all meetings. 

We are at present endeavoring to form a 
baseball team, with a view to competing for 
the prizes offered by the management for the 
championship club. 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, F. G. Nodocker, Superin- 
tendent's Office, St. George 



54 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanun Chairman, Superintendent 

B. F. Kelly Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

S. A. Turvey Secretary, Trainmaster's and Marine Clerk 

H. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

A. Conley Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. DeRevere Medical Examiner 

J. B. Sharp Agent, St. George Coal Piers 

F. W. Nolan Agent, St. George Transfer 

P. A. Witherspoox Track Supervisor 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

J. F. McGowan Division Operator 

W. E. Connell Supervisor of Crossing Watchmen 

F. Peterson Division Agent 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members 

J. P. Miller Towerman 

T. F. Brennen Conductor 

G. McKinnon Machinist 

Harry Barry Foreman Painter 

A. L. Cummiskey Car Inspector 

Alton Ratjscher Transitman 

G. Hartman Engineer 

A. Nichols Fireman 

Joseph McDonald Signal Repairman 

H. Owens Trainman 

B. F. Winant Agent, Port Richmond 



G. B. Stansbury Investigator, Representing Track Dep't 

It has been noted that a certain individual 
from Pier No. 6, St. George, has been spending 
his Sunday evenings at South Beach. It is 
rumored that he is still "looking for his 
mother." 

What's the matter with the "Black 
Diamond" ball team? 

On June 9 P. V. Flannery, freight agent at 
Port Ivory, sailed forth on the sea of matri- 
mony. He spent his honeymoon at Niagara 
Falls. 

The accompanying picture is of John J. 
Langford, chief yard clerk at St. George. 
"Jack" entered the service on December 24, 
1911, and has worked his way up from mes- 
senger to his present position. "~ 




CHIEF Y ARD CLERK JOHN J. LANGFORD 




A ST. GEORGE QUARTETTE 



The accompanying picture was taken in front 
of Pier 6, St. George. Reading from left to 
right, those in it are: R. Guth, secretary to 
trainmaster; A. J. Conley, road foreman of 
engines; H. Libsey, patrolman, and S. A. 
Turvey, marine and trainmaster's clerk. 

The following ladies have been added to the 
superintendent's office force at Pier 6, St. 
George: Mrs. Kathryn Purcell, Miss Bessie 
Gaynor, stenographers, and Miss Gladys Mc- 
Andrews, file clerk. 

On June 1 Frank Peterson, division agent, 
was promoted to chief clerk to general traffic 
agent, at 295 Broadway. Erich Decker, 
traveling auditor, succeeds Mr. Peterson. 

The Staten Island Railroad Club 

At the regular business meeting on June 4, 
the following committees were appointed: 

House Committee: C. A. Wilson, chairman; 
Chester Ball, Irving Titus, G. J. Goolic, F. 
Dolan, J. Kahn, R. E. Guth. 

Press Committee: F. G. Nodocker, chairman; 
B. A. Campbell, S. A. Turvey. 

Entertainment Committee: H. W. Ordeman, 
chairman; B. F. Kelly, H. W. Bowen. 

Ladies' Committee (to serve for three 
months): Mrs. H. R. Hanlin, chairman; Mrs. 
Joseph S. Fabregas, Mrs. C. E. Floom. 

The initiation fee of $2.00 was suspended 
indefinitely. 

The basement of the club house will be con- 
verted into a gymnasium. 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondent, J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

W. T. R. IIoddinott Vice Chairman, Trainmaster 

G. F. Ebehly Division Engineer 

J. P. Hines Master Mechanic 

II. K. Haktman Chief Train Dispatcher 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

F. J. Young Captain of Police 

T. P>. Fkankmn Terminal Agent 



THE BALTIMORE AND 



F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

B. S. Daniels Road Engineer 

Hood Simpson Road Fireman 

W. T. Marvel Road Conductor 

J. C. Williams Yard Conductor 

W. A. Tang ye Coppersmith, Shopman 

Edward Marker Car Builder, Repair Yardman 

R. C. Acton Secretary 



Effective June 20 R. B. White was appointed 
superintendent of the Philadelphia Division, 
vice S. T. Cantrell, granted leave of absence. 

Will any of our employes who know the 
address of Mrs. Charles F. Knapp, formerly of 
804 Cornplanter Avenue, please communicate 
with the Philadelphia Division correspondent? 

R. T. Bartlett was appointed freight and 
ticket agent at Joppa, Md., on May 22. 

R. F. Trump, agent and yardmaster at Pier 
62, Philadelphia, left the service of the Com- 
pany on June 15, to engage in private business. 

W. J. Hallahan, who has been chief clerk at 
Pier 62 for some years, has been appointed 
freight agent and yardmaster at that poink. 

I. E. White, for the past year agent at Col- 
lingdale, Pa., enlisted in the United States 
Army on June 1. 

Five hundred employes participated in a flag 
raising ceremony at the East Side locomotive 
repair shop on May 12. Mr. Cantrell made an 
address and as the flag was raised the Em- 
ployes' Band played the "Star Spangled Ban- 
ner" and a company of National Guardsmen 
fired a salute. 

Freight roundhouse foreman A. H. Hodges 
has been transferred to New Castle Junction as 
general foreman. He is succeeded by George 
R. Foster, transferred from Riverside. Good 
luck to both gentlemen! 

A number of the East Side shop boys have 
made application for enlistment in the Ninth 
Engineers Reserve Regiment, for service in 
France. 

Machinist William Tisdale was recently pro- 
moted to the position of machine shop foreman. 



EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 55 

He has been complimented by the Divisional 
officers on the fine condition of his shop. 

G. G. Hook has been transferred to Benwood. 
We were sorry to see him leave us, but wish 
him success in his new work. 

A new inspection pit has been placed in service 
at East Side. This improvement will greatly 
facilitate the movement of power. 

The next time foreman Dunn visits Ken- 
tucky he will return with a smile that won't 
come off. We understand that his bride will 
return with him. 

Since piecework has been started on the fire 
track our efficient hostler foreman, Frank 
Menna, has handled it very successfully. 
There has been a marked decrease in the cost 
of handling engines. 

K. R. Henthorne has been transferred from 
Baltimore as night roundhouse foreman, vice 
E. H. Pettit. transferred to the day turn. He 
is doing good work. 

Eight women have been employed at East 
Side. They clean the shop, and their work 
has been satisfactory. 

The stork has visited the homes of foreman 
J. H. Darby and machinist C. P. Steen. 

Hostler W. Ballentine has been promoted to 
engineer. He was an efficient hostler and we 
don't like to lose him, but we are glad to see 
him advance. 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superintendent' s 
Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. B. Gorsuch Chairman, Superintendent 

R. A. Grammes Vice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Washington 

C. H. Winslow Secretary, Brunswick 




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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



56 



Relief Depaktment 

Dr. E. H. Mathers Medical Examiner, Camden Station 

Dr. J. A. Robb Medical Examiner, Washington 

Dr. J. F. Ward Medical Examiner, Winchester, Va. 

Transportation Department 
S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick, Md. 

C. A. Mewshaw .. Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. Hurlock Division Operator, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J. J. McCabe . Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Agent, Brunswick, Md. 

W. E. Neilson Agent, Camden Station 

C. C. Bastain Freight Conductor, Riverside 

W. F. Moody Freight Engineer, Riverside 

J. B. McGovern Freight Fireman, Riverside 

H. B. Bohanon Yard Conductor, Mount Clare 

R. B. Banks Divisional Claim Agent, Baltimore, Md. 

J. M. Powell Captain of Police, Camden Station 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

L. C. Bowers Supervisor, Camden Station 

E. D. Calvert Supervisor, Winchester, Va. 

W. E. Poole Section Foreman, Gaithers, Md. 

J M. Gross Carpenter Foreman, Staunton, Va. 

E. C. Hobbs Signal Repairman, Gaithers, Md. 

Motive Power Department 
T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Williamson General Car Foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

H. S. Ely Clerk to Car Foreman, Camden Station 

G. N. Hammond Material Distributer, Locust Point 

F. C. Schorndorfer General Foreman, Brunswick, Md. 

G. B. Dinges Clerk to Car Foreman, Brunswick, Md. 

C. F. Serp Machinist Apprentice, Riverside, Md. 

Effective April 23 J. J. Swartzback was ap- 
pointed terminal trainmaster of the Baltimore 
Terminals. 

An event worthy of more than passing notice 
was staged at Brunswick on June 9, when the 
employes of the eastbound yard flung "Old 



Glory" to the breeze at the eastbound freight 
hump. An eighty-five foot staff had been 
erected, and the flag measured twenty-two by 
twelve feet. The banner cost the patriotic 
employes nearly half a hundred dollars, and 
was purchased by voluntary contribution. 

Yardmaster C. W. Suter had general super- 
vision of the plans for the flag raising, and, 
with the able assistance of his corps of clerks, 
carried it through in fine style. The Bruns- 
wick I. O. O. F. Band, which is made up of 
railroad employes, played a number of selec- 
tions during the ceremony, and also on the 
special train that was run from the station to 
the hump to carry the speakers and the folks 
who wished to witness the event. 

While the band played the "Star Spangled 
Banner," the flag was raised to the top of the 
staff. As the breeze caught the folded flag 
and spread it in a blaze of beauty against a 
dark background of clouds, a white dove, in 
the midst of hundreds of tiny flags, spread its 
wings and flew away. 

Secretary E. K. Smith of the Baltimore and 
Ohio Y. M. C. A. presided and introduced the 
speakers. Short addresses were delivered by 
the following: Z. T. Brantner, of Martinsburg, 
formerly of Brunswick; the Rev. H. C. Erdman, 
of Burkittnville; assistant superintendent S. A. 
Jordan; J. T. Martin, mayor of Brunswick; 
Dr. H. S. Hedges, the Rev. E. E. Burgess, the 
Rev. J. T. Hart, and the Rev. G. W. Whiteside, 
all of Brunswick. Superintendent C. B. Gor- 
such, of the Baltimore Division, and Leo Wein- 
berg, of Frederick, who had been invited to 
speak, sent letters of regret. 

The ceremony was cut short by a light shower 
that began just as the Rev. Whiteside began 
speaking and which sent the audience scuttling 
to the waiting coaches. 




S< HOOF CHILDREN WHO ( i A I'll FRFD I.N FRONT OF MO F N I' ROYAL STATION TO SING 
PATRIOTIC SONGS ON THE OCCASION OF MARSHAL JOFFRE'S VISIT TO BALTIMORE 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



.57 



Riverside Baltimore and Ohio "T*" I""" " I ™T™ 

y. m. c. a. wi r\ ■ t^m 

The Ladies' Auxiliary of the Riverside "Y" THAT PROTECT AND PAY 

held a very successful block carnival on East ^ ^ ^ wJ , ^ _ . ... / , T , „ ^ „ _ 

Randall Street late in June. BOOKS AND ADVICE FREE 

Send sketch or model for search. Highest References. 
Secretary Stacy recently made a trip to Best Results. Promptness Assured. 

Philadelphia, where he held a meeting with WATSON E. COLEMAN, Patent Lawyer 

the men at East Side roundhouse. He then 624 F Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 

visited the quarters of the Ninth Engineer — 

Reserve Regiment, finding Captain J. Mc- DATUIUTC Secured or All Fees Returned. 

Donough, formerly assistant superintendent j^AlEniO SOLD FREE! InVentOR: ff?!5H! 
of shops at Mount Clare, .Lieutenant A. Lr. Our " Patent Sales Department " Bulletin and 2 books FREE! 

Moler, formerly machinist at the same place, Send data for actual FREE search. Beat references, 

and private J. J. Stevens, formerly of the E. E. VROOMAN & CO., 866 F St., Washington, D. C. 

Philadelphia Division and private "Jack" . . 

Byron, formerly of Riverside shops, in the pink 

of condition. Mr. Stacy, who is a veteran of (Dr. Mott is general secretary of the Inter- 

the Spanish-American war, speaks most highly national Committee and a member of the 

of the discipline and soldierly bearing of the American Commission to Russia recently 

members of the regiment, most of whom have appointed by President Wilson.) Music was 

had no previous military training. furnished by the Terminal R. R. Y. M. C. A. 

orchestra, under the direction of C. W. Guest. 
Vocal selections were given by the Musurgia 

Washington Terminal Quartette, Mr. Harry Wheaton Howard, 

pianist and director; Mrs. Ethel Holtzclaw 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretary Gawler, soprano; Mrs. William T. Reed, 

Y.M.C.A. contralto; Mr. Richard P. Backing, tenor; 

~. . . , c , . ~ ... Mr. Earl Carbaugh, bass. There were brief 

Divisional Safety Committee , . re r j.u •' j> i 

reports by the officers of the association, and 

Ster^S^S-!!^ Patriotic songs, in which the audience joined. 

Motive Power Department As we look about we are more and more 

G. W. Kiehm Air Brake Supervisor convinced that the railroad man is loyal to the 

W.M.Grant Boiler Foreman last. A number of our members have been 

C J A A B ™s HT Gan g Leader called to service since June 1, among them are: 

A. p. Sot'. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. '. ' '. . Storekeeper Joseph Tregor, Navy; J. J. McCue, Army Medi- 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher cal Corps; P. J. Carr, Aviation Corps; C. M. 

g- p£ ET Foreman Car Shop Mark, Marine Corps. Mr. Mark was formerly 

H. A. Barefteld Assistant Foreman , » , . K*. c f J 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station employed in the office of the auditor of mer- 

G. F. Mergell Foreman of Electricians chandise accounts, of the Baltimore and Ohio, 

J J Desmond L< fder t Baltimore. A number of trainmen who are 

G. Valentine Yard Engine Dispatcher . , j • , ^ , 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman m our membership desire to go to France and 

R. Heindrich Foreman, Station help run the trains there. 

Transportation Department Terminal Company employes are displaying 

J. McCauley Assistant Yardmaster t h e ir loyalty in other ways. The force at the 

L. T. Keane Conductor ^ i =ir i i i • i • i .i 

F M Farmer Conductor Coach Yard have a garden just outside the 

, v _ Administration Building and have planted 

Maintenance or Way Department tableg> T} f e den ig { hriving 

F. W. Hodge™: ! ! ! ! [ [ . . :¥^£S£££$5 and promises to help in cutting the high cost of 

H. L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop living for those who are doing the cultivating. 

A.M.Brady Track Foreman - 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman All hearts were saddened by the news of the 

P.C. Richman Signal Maintainer death of Dr. P. H. Steltz, for many years 

H. R. Callahan Signal Foreman medical examiner for the Terminal Company. 

The Ninth Annual Meeting of the Terminal Dr ' Steltz had been in poor health for several 

Railroad Department, Young Men's Christian months He died on June 5. Funeral services 

Association, was held on June 27, at 8 p. m. were held at his late residence on June 7. They 

The principal address of the evening was given ™ ere ^ te ? ded + by % e members of the staff of 

by Mr. C. V. Hibbard, of New York, who was ^ Washington Terminal Company The 

with the Japanese troops in Manchuria during body was removed to Allentown, Pennsylvania, 

the Russo-Japanese war. Soon after the begin- tor mterment - 

ning of the European War he was made Dr. Congratulations are due L. C. Houser, one of 

J. R. Mott's representative in Europe, to our members, on the advent of a fine young 

extend the work for soldiers and prisoners of lady in his home. She is hale and hearty and 

war in the various countries. He is now Dr. her mother is getting along well. Houser has 

Mott's associate, with supervision of the war not yet become accustomed to being called 

work of the Young Men's Christian Association. "Daddy." 

Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



58 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting, Chief Clerk 

This has been a month of uncertainties in 
railroading, as well as in all other branches of 
business, and Washington Freight Station has 
been no exception to the rule. Registration 
Day has come and gone and has left us in the 
uncertain state of not knowing how many of 
our fine young men who registered their names 
on the eventful day will, be called upon to leave 
us for active service in the ranks of Uncle Sam's 
fighters for freedom and right. Between 
thirty-five and forty of our station employes 
are within the age limit and are now awaiting 
the call to duty. Two or three from our office 
force volunteered for service before June 5. 
John J. Laverine and Joseph P. Bailey both 
offered their services to the Naval Reserve, 
while W. Lee Santman is anxious to serve his 
country as a trooper in a cavalry regiment. 
All honor to our volunteers! 

These changes have naturally created vacan- 
cies and we welcome Miss Elizabeth Tiverny 
and Miss L. Berman, who take the places of our 
future soldiers! 

Sickness has again visited our force — cashier 
W. Y. Stillwell has fallen a victim to an attack 
of nervous prostration of so serious a nature 
that he was obliged to relinquish his duties 
and apply for a furlough of several months. 
We all hope that his rest will produce the wished 
for result and that he will return to us with 
renewed strength and vigor to again take up 
the work which for so many years he has done 
so well. 

Everyone here is trying to do his or her 
"bit" for the boys who will be called to the front. 
Some of us have subscribed for Liberty Bonds, 
while others are working for the more material 



comforts of our soldier boys by joining the 
great Red Cross Army that is preparing warm 
clothing and articles of a like nature. Among 
those doing this work are Mrs. Fisher, wife of 
our freight agent, and her sister, Mrs. Hearn, 
Mrs. J. T. Mathews, wife of our general fore- 
man and Mrs. W. L. Whiting, wife of our chief 
clerk. 

Business continues good, notwithstanding 
the fact that the summer period is here. 



Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Morgan, Secretary 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

L. Finegan Chairman, Superintendent of Shops 

E. P. Poole Vice Chairman, Asst. Supt. of Shops 

W. L. Morgan Secretary, Secretary to Supt. of Shops 

J. Howe General Foreman 

H. A. Beaumont General Car Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

Dr. F. H. Digges Assistant Medical Examiner 

A. G. Cavedo Machinist, Erecting Shop 

W. L. Childs Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 

J. R. Frothingham Machinist, No. 1 Machine Shop 

W. W. Wilkeson Machine Operator, No. 2 Machine Shop 

B. F. Douglass, Jr Pipe Fitter, Pipe and Tin Shop 

W. C. Duvall Coremaker, Foundries and Re-rolling Mill 

L. E. Blank Machine Operator, Blacksmith Shop 

and Flue Plant 

George Groin Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

L. A. Hinzerberger Machine Operator, Air Brake Shop 

J. J. Keogh Patternmaker Apprentice, Pattern Shop 

O. F. Doyle Machinist, Steel Car Plant and 

No. 3 Machine Shop 

B. F. Coon Tender Repairman, Tender and 

Tender Plant Shop 

P. O'Brien Machine Operator, Axle Shop and 

Power Plant 

F. J. Sobens Material Man, Freight Car Track 

J. V. Guntz Car Builder, Passenger Car Erecting Shop 

G. Allenbaugh Upholsterer, Upholstering, 

Passenger Car, Paint and Finishing Shops 

W. Snyder Carpenter, Saw Mill and Cabinet Shop 

G. Schueffle Material Distributer, 1st Floor Storehouse 



MOUNT CLARE DRAFTSMEN ENJOYING AN OUTING ON MIDDLE RIVER 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



59 



The picture on page 58 shows the "live" 
ones of the drawing office at Mount Clare, on 
the occasion of their recent outing at Edward 
Stier's summer residence, Middle River, on 
June 16. The boys all had some time and 
Mr. Stier does not think that the necessary 
resulting repairs to the building will cost 
much. 

Colonel Peach, C. J. Weber, C. T. Rommel, 
A. C. Hensen and "Uncle Dick" Godman were 
also present at the outing, but as is well known, 
the camera cannot stand too much. Hence, 
the non-appearance of their faces in the picture. 

Twelve of the twenty Mount Clare men 
whose applications were considered for enlist- 
ment in the Ninth Regiment of the Engineer 
Reserve Corps, to be assigned to railroad work 
in France, were accepted, and they are now in 
training in Philadelphia, preparatory to going 
to France. There were about fifty men at 
this shop who wanted to go, but there were 
not enough vacancies for that number. J. 
McDonough, formerly assistant superintendent 
of shops, received a commission as captain in 
this regiment, and left Mount Clare early in 
June, to take up this new duty. The regiment 
of railroad men are doing well in training and 
are rapidly learning the ins and outs of the 
military game. 

On June 8 the Mount Clare Band gave a 
concert, entertainment and dance at Hazazer's 
Hall. The affair was well handled, and was 
much enjoyed by those present. Dancing was 
indulged in until a late hour. 

On June 16, on the storehouse platform at 
Mount Clare, a meeting was held in the interest 
of the Liberty Loan. The meeting was ad- 
dressed by Mr. Towers, chairman of the 
Public Service Commission of Maryland and 
by Dr. W. W. Wood, representative of our 
president, Mr. Willard. Both talks were 
interesting and greatly enjoyed by the men, 
who have shown their patriotic spirit by a 
large contribution to the Liberty Loan. 



Effective June 18 E. P. Poole, formerly 
supervisor of tool equipment and piecework 
for the System, was appointed assistant superin- 
tendent of shops at Mount Clare, vice J. Mc- 
Donough, furloughed for military duty. We 
are all glad to see Mr. Poole get this well 
deserved promotion. 



R. M. Hesser has been appointed general 
piecework inspector at Mount Clare, vice 
C. C. Brown, resigned. Mr. Hesser was 
formerly assistant general piecework inspector 
and his creditable work has won him this well 
deserved promotion. 

The fifth annual exercises of the Mount 
Clare Apprentice School, which takes care of 
both the Riverside and Mount Clare appren- 
tices, were held under the auspices of the 
Apprentice Association on June 15, at the 
Gracchur Club Rooms, formerly the West 
Branch Y. M. C. A. At this gathering the 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



prizes, three in number, are given to those 
who have proved themselves to be most 
proficient in both shop and class room work. 
The first prize is a twenty dollar gold piece, 
the second a set of machinist's tools, and the 
third Forney's Catechism and one year's 
subscription to the Railway Mechanical Engi- 
neer. The prize winners were as follows: 
first, Charles F. Serp; second, E. B. Binns, and 
third, C. B. Bosien. Other boys whose work 
was of a very high order and who were given 
special mention were N. A. Emmerich, Walter 
Dugan and C. L. McKenzie. Others were 
given honorable mention because of the high 
class work they had done. They were first 
class apprentices A. Ludwig, O. C. Westley, 
W. H. Collins, F. H. Einwachter, F. E. Morrison 
and J. T. Harvey; and second class apprentices 
E. W. Horlebein, F. A. Cardegna and J. T. 
Talbott. 

The address of the evening was delivered 
by G. W. Smith, president of the Mount Clare 
Welfare, Pleasure and Athletic Association. 
He advised the apprentices to prepare them- 
selves for the future by applying themselves 
to their work. The following officials were 
present, all of whom seemed highly gratified 
with the work on exhibition and the progress 
made by the boys: O. C. Cromwell, mechanical 
engineer; A. K. Galloway, general master 
mechanic; T. F. Perkinson, division master 
mechanic; J. F. Peach, chief clerk to general 
superintendent of motive power; J. Howe, 
general foreman, Mount Clare; E. P. Poole, 
assistant superintendent of shops, Mount Clare, 
and R. H. Cline, motive power inspector. 
•>Iost of these men made short addresses and 
assisted in the awarding of the prizes. A 
goodly number of the boys and their friends 
were present at the affair, which was a most 
enjoyable one. Dancing followed the exer- 
cises. 



W-_S. Harig Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Taylor Master Carpenter 

W. L. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. Montignani. Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
A. L. Brown Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. R. Reckley Freight Engineer 

O. E. Pace Freight Fireman 

J. W. McMackin Freight Conductor 

H. H. Barley Yard Brakeman 

J. G. Defibatjgh Machinist 

R . L. Fields Car Inspector 

J. C. Snyder Operator 

Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association of 
Cumberland, Md. 

President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

R. B. Stout Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

D. H. Street Division Freight Agent 

W. H. Linn General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

Secretary 

T. F. Shaffer Chief Clerk to Division Engineer 

Miss Eurith Elmira Wildesen, of Gormania, 
W. Va., and Harley Otis Beckman, assistant 
secretary of the Cumberland Baltimore and 
Ohio Y. M. C. A., were married in Gormania 
on June 21. The Reverend Frank Brooke 
performed the ceremony, which took place 
out-of-doors. 

Keyser 

V. A. Lyons, night ticket clerk,, has been 
transferred to Deer Park Hotel for the summer. 
Louis D. Long succeeds him at Keyser. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. C. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
Thomas R. Rees, Secretary to Superintendent 
W. C. Montignani, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
C. L. Kalbaugh, Chief Clerk to Master Mechanic 

Divisional Safety Committee 



G. D. Brooke Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Deneen Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt., East End 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welhhonce Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 

Li J. Wii.motii Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. St fc wart Master Mechanic 

R. B Stotjt Assistant Master Mechanic 

E. C. Duawbai-<;ii Division Operator 

Dh. J A Do h N m Medical Examiner 

Dr. F. IF I). Riser Medical Examiner 

Dh L. D. Nokiiis Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. 1). Stkoube Joint Agent 

F F. Dean Car Foreman, Fast End 

W.T.Davis Car Foreman , West End 

F. F. Leyh Storekeeper 

\V . M . HlMDri St orekeeper 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

Blacksmith's helper John C. Wolford is the 
proud father of a fine baby boy. Blacksmith 
Berry says John is as tickled as a dog with two 
tails. Just how joyful that is you will have 

to guess. 

George W. Duhvick, a native of Martinsburg, 
recently died at his home on Water Street, 
at the age of sixty-three years. Mr. Dalwick 
served the Baltimore and Ohio for many years 
as a blacksmith, w r orking in the shop here when 
Martinsburg was a Divisional Terminal. At 
the removal to Brunswick he went to work 
there and followed his trade until several 
years ago failing health compelled his retire- 
ment. After this retirement he came to his 
oal ive city to live. 

Mr. Dalwick was ;i man of upright character 
who was held in high regard by all who knew 
him. He was a member of the Masonic and 
Pythian fraternities, and these brotherhoods 
and a host of friends mourn his loss. The 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



61 



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funeral services were held at his late home. 
The service was conducted by Dr. H. P. Ham- 
mill, pastor of Trinity M. E. Church, South, 
of which Mr. Dalwick was a member. 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 
E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

R. F. Haney, Conductor, Weston 
C. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. M. Scott Chairman, Superintendent, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Grafton, W. Va. 

W. I. Rowland Road Foreman, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

H. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

Dr. C. A. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton, W. Va. 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont, W. Va. 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clarksburg, W. Va. 

R. L. Schill Agent, Weston, W. Va. 

E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon, W. Va. 

F. W. Tutt Secretary, Chief Clerk to Division 

Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

L. W. Grapes Fireman, Fairmont, W. Va. 

D. R. Ridenour Machinist, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. Pickens Brakeman, Grafton, W. Va. 

A. L. Lunsford Engineer, Weston, W. Va. 

G. W. Binnix Car Inspector, Fairmont, W. Va. 

J. W. Hostler Engineer, Grafton, W. Va. 

W. P. Kincatd Locomotive Inspector, Fairmont, W. Va. 



During the past month the Monongah Divi- 
sion has seen quite a number of changes on the 
Division staff, viz.: G. F. Eberly, division 
engineer of the Philadelphia Division, was 
transferred to Grafton, vice E. T. Brown, 
resigned. J. W. McClung was appointed 
trainmaster, with headquarters at Grafton, 
covering the territory from Grafton to Clarks- 
burg on the Parkersburg Branch and G. and B. 



District; Ernie Bartlett, trainmaster of the 
Parkersburg Branch, Clarksburg to Parkers- 
burg; B. Z. Holverstott, headquarters Fair- 
mont, covering M. R. and Short Line, and 
W. C. Deegan, headquarters Weston, covering 
West Virginia and Pittsburgh. 

The accompanying picture is of J. W. Leith, 
the oldest carpenter foreman on the Monongah 
Division. Mr. Leith entered the service as a 
carpenter on March 1, 1882, and on July 9, 1887, 
was promoted to carpenter foreman, which 
position he has faithfully filled to the present 
time. 

"Uncle John," as he is called by all his 
friends, is very genial, and no matter how 
difficult the task that confronts him, he goes 




J. W. LEITH 



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62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



about his work in a happy mood. He is a good 
Christian man and one that the Monongah 
Division is proud of having on its territory. 

An interesting veteran employe is R. M. 
Colvin, whose picture appears on this page. 
He entered the service on April 1, 1868, as a 
fireman, and on February 20, 1870, was pro- 
moted to engineer on No. 71. In 1910, after 
forty-two years of faithful and efficient service, 
he was pensioned. A few weeks ago he dropped 
into our office to show us an interesting letter 
from S. E. Graham, now train dispatcher on 
the Norfolk & Western, at Crewe, W. Va., 
and a former Baltimore and Ohio man. 

Among other items of interest about old times 
on the Parkersburg Branch Mr. Graham gives 
a list of the engineers and their engines in 1870, 
as follows: 

"R. M. Colvin, 71; Henry Kidwell, 73; Jesse 
Pierce, 75; Henry Jenks, 79; Joe Clayton, 86; 
John Gigley, 85; William Armstrong, 91; Pat 
Flanerv, 92; John Kuh, 96; John Woolward, 100; 
8am Steel, 109; Bill Carr, 173; J. Jennings, 174; 
Buck Williams, 179; Felix Posten, 107; Jno. 
Clayton, 222; George Posten, 223; Jo. Rowland, 
209 (then later Earl got the 209); Jno. Devine, 
282; Milton Parker, 284; later Robinette, 92, 
then to 341, and I think Colvin was on the coal 
train during this time; Kuh, 95; Anderson, 
197; Crum, 325; Flannery, 329; Posten, 330, 
William Carr, 223; Jesse Pierce, 340; Ben 
Mvers, 344; later Gigley, 371; Flarence, 369; 
Bill Satterfield, 367; Flannery, 366; Kidwell, 
371; Henry Jenks, 330; Taylor Groves, 329; 
Joe Clayton, 325; Gibson, 197; Sampson, 95; 
F. K. Willson, 330. I saw Jenks on 330 but 
once — possibly he did not have the engine 
regularly." 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondents 
M. J. Sauter, Office of Superintendent 
D. F. Allread, Agent, Reader, W. Va. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. M. Haver Superintendent, Chairman 

E. H. Barnhart Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

W. F. Ross Road Foreman of Engines 

W. Beverly Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

R. A. Nease Machinist Helper 

W. C. Wright Supervisor 

J. Thonen Engineer 

E. L. Parker Freight Conductor 

L. C. Bomer Freight Conductor 

B. Huff Machinist 

J. E. Holler Freight Fireman 



A. Brown, ticket agent, and L. T. Berry, 
baggagemaster at Moundsville, W. Va., have 
combined to defeat the "High Cost of Living." 
At present they have a number of acres under 
cultivation and are circulating tales of a 
bumper crop. 

Operators and agent-operators on the Wheel- 
ing Division were examined on sight, hearing 
and color sense during the second week in June. 

A. M. Six, ticket agent at Wheeling passenger 
station, has moved his family to the camp 
ground at Moundsville, to spend the summer 
months. Mr. Six recently acquired a five 
passenger automobile, in which he is traveling 
to and from Moundsville. 




J!. M. COL> I N 



It is expected that by July 1 the fourth floor 
of Wheeling passenger station will be ready 
for occupancy by the Wheeling Athletic Asso- 
ciation of the Baltimore and Ohio. Practically 
all the facilities of a first-class gymnasium have 
been installed and the finishing touches are now 
being put on. 

L. K. Landau, our genial maintenance of way 
material clerk, has left for Tulsa, Okla., where 
he will engage in the oil supply business. Mr. 
Landau was secretary of the Athletic Asso- 
ciation. His many friends wish him much 
success. 

There have been many favorable remarks 
made by pedestrians and drivers in regard to 
the manner in which our crossings arc being 
protected by the ten crossing watch-women now 
on duty in Wheeling. 

Lew E. Foster 

President of the Wheeling Division Athletic 
Association 

Lew E. Foster entered the service of the 
( lompany on .January (i, 11)05, as a telegrapher 
on the Wheeling Division. In August, 1907, 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



03 




LEW E. FOSTER 



he was promoted to copy operator in the dis- 
patcher's office, Wheeling, and in May, 1915, 
was made manager and wire chief of "FY" 
telegraph office, Wheeling, the position that 
he now holds. When the Wheeling Division 
Athletic Association was formed he was made 
its president. 

Mr. Foster has always been keenly interested 
in athletic and social events. He is a fine 
dancer, an expert swimmer and a racing cyclist 
of note. His work along welfare lines is in its 
infancy, and he hopes to make the Wheeling 
Athletic Association the leader in Baltimore 
and Ohio athletic circles. That he is a man of 
original ideas is proved by the fact that he 
was the originator of the novel dance program, 
worked out in the form of a miniature time- 
table, used at the annual Wheeling Division 
ball last December. 

The Athletic Association is in splendid 
condition. There are now 175 members and 
200 are expected in the near future. There is 
$400 in the treasury and $500 worth of gym- 
nasium equipment has been bought and paid 
for. $200 has been expended for shower baths, 
and other improvements for the club rooms, 
including a player piano, a phonograph and a 
pool table, are contemplated. 

Mr. Foster extends a hearty invitation to 
those interested in welfare work to join him in 
making the Wheeling Division Association a 
leader in the System Athletic Association. 

E. M. Pomeroy, agent at Bellaire, is able to 
resume his duties after recovering from a severe 
attack of rheumatism. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
E. L. Sorrell, Office of Superintendent 
R. E. Barnhart, Office of Superintendent 
W. E. Kennedy, Office of Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

Superintendent 

Trainmaster 

Road Foreman of Enginer 

Master Mechanis 

Division Engineec 

Division Claim Agent 

Medical Examiner 

Captain of Police 

Agent, Parkersburg 

Agent- Yardmaster, Huntington 

Secretary 

Rotating Members 

H. L. Bartels Engineer 

O. W. McCartv Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M. F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

O. F. Taylor Locomotive Department 

E. Farrell Stores Department 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. B. Gymer, Secretary 
to Superintendent, Cleveland 

Divisional Safety Committee 



H. B. Green Superintendent 

F. P. Netj Secretary 

J. J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

F. W. Rhuark Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. Tuttle Division Operator 




H. C. NESBITT 

Division Accountant and President of the 
Ohio River Division Athletic Association 



J. W Root 

F. C. Moran 

E. J. Langhurst 

O. J. Kelly 

C. E. Bryan 

W. E. Kennedy. . 
Dr. J. P. Lawlor 

E. Chapman 

F. A. Carpenter. 
S. E. Eastburn. . 
H. F. Owens 



64 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Rotating Members (to serve three months) 



E. J. Cramptox Agent, Elyria 

R. Blythe Operator, Canton 

C. E. Biechler Section Foreman, Sterling 

J. T. Sidaway Carpenter, Massillon 

\V. E. Butts Conductor, Lorain 

A. H. Sheffield Engineer, Lorain 

\V. B. Shockcor Engineer, Cleveland 

A. L. Ruth Conductor, Akron 

F. J. Rericha Conductor, Cleveland 

J. Losier Car Inspector, Cleveland 

J. Lewis Pipe Shop Foreman, Lorain 



Effective June 1 A. D. Rosier was appointed 
assistant storekeeper at Cleveland, vice F. W. 
Reynolds, promoted to storekeeper at East 
Chicago, Ind. 

F. P. Neu, former secretary to the superin- 
tendent, has accepted a position as a switch- 
man in Cleveland yard. Watch your step, 
"Red." 

E. C. Mishler, night clerk in the dispatcher's 
office at Cleveland, recently selected a life 
partner. He has our best wishes. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark, O. 

C. H. Titus Yice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

T. J. Daly Assistant Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

J. Tordella Division Engineer, Newark, O. 

Wm. Streck Road Fo*-°man, Newark, O. 

W. F. Moran Master Mecnanic, Newark, O. 



A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent, Newark, O 

D. L. Host T. M. & C. T. D., Columbus, O 

C. G. Miller Shopman, Newark, 

J. A. Mitchell Conductor, Newark, O. 

W. C. Neighbarger Engineer, Newark, O. 

J. C. McVicker Fireman, Newark, (). 

W. F. Hall Car Repairman, Newark, O. 

D. E. Duffy Blacksmith, Newark, O. 

C. Rittenhouse . Yard Conductor, Newark, O. 



Newark Shops 

Newark shop has the distinction of being 
the first in this section of the state to employ 
women on men's work, because of war condi- 
tions. Since the news was first published in 
the papers that all of the large trunk lines 
would employ women on some classes of work 
heretofore performed by men, superintendent 
of shops Cooper has been fairly besieged by 
women seeking employment in the shops, and, 
as an outcome, seven women donned overalls 
and caps and were started to work in the shops 
on May 15. Their duties consist of sweeping, 
cleaning windows, small jobs of painting, 
sorting scrap, etc. 

Miss Anna Dunn has succeeded "Bud" 
Schaller as file clerk in the superintendent of 
shop's office. Miss Dunn has had considerable 
experience in clerical and stenographic work 
in various offices in Columbus and Cleveland. 
We wish her much success in her new position. 

The Newark shop baseball team played its 
first game of the season on May 19, with 
Zanesville as its opponent, and the Newark 
boys won by the score of 9 to 4. We have some 




K.MI'LO YES AT LORAIN STATION ON AN ENJOYABLE TRIP THROUGH THE TERMINALS 
Reading from left to right: Enginoer Shaver, Foroman Ray, William Tre33BL, Brakeman Buckley, Conductor 
Will mot, the M1.H303 Viviam Shaver, Anna Stoup, Gladys Rose, Eva Rogers, Florence 
Latto, Loretta Hoffman and Lucilb Webb and J. C. Hahn 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



65 



ball team this year, which will be fully realized 
by the other teams on the System before the 
season is over. 

The employes' second annual ball for the 
benefit of the baseball team was held in the hall 
of the Knights of Pythias Temple in Newark 
on the evening of May 23. It proved a great 
success from every standpoint. The weather 
was ideal for dancing and a large and merry- 
making crowd enjoyed the light fantastic from 
an early hour in the evening until midnight. 
Abbott's Orchestra furnished splendid music. 
The receipts, which amounted to a neat sum 
over expenses, were turned over to the treasurer 
of the baseball club and will be used to defray the 
expenses of the team when playing away from 
home and also to purchase bats and balls and 
other equipment as needed throughout the 
season. 

The general manager's and vice-president's 
party made a recent inspection trip to Newark 
shops and seemed pleased with the clean and 
neat appearance on and about the shop premises. 

The shop employes' picnic, which has been 
an annual event for the last several years, has 
been called off this summer because of war 
conditions. 

W. L. Clugston, better known in the shops 
as "Pete," the young and hustling erecting 
shop foreman, is a great devotee of Isaac 
Walton's pastime. If there is anything "Pete" 
likes better than fishing, it is more of the same 
thing. It is natural for all fishermen to have 
wonderful stories to tell of their experiences, 
but when "Pete" gets started, hold tight to 
your seats, boys, for you are going to hear 
some hair-raising tales. However, we can 
vouch for his recent catch of thirty large 
Lake Erie bass, all of which were hooked in a 
half day's time at beautiful Buckeye Lake. 

David Westall, who has been in the service 
of the Company for many years as machinist 
and gang foreman, has resigned to take employ- 
ment with the Western Maryland Railway at 
Hagerstown, Md. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup't, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHuff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass' t Sup't, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Brotjghton Chairman, Superintendent 

CM. Stone Trainmaster 

T. E. Miller Master Mechanic 

G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner 

H. B. Pigman Division Operator 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

H. D. Whip Relief Agent 

C. A. Albright Agent 

E. E. McDonald Agent 

W. F. Herwick Conductor 

W. J. Dayron Road Brakeman 

O. E. Newcomer Fireman 

W. H. Metzgar Supervisor 

E. C. Lucas Car Foreman 

A. L. Friel Shop Foreman 

H. E. Cochran Secretary 




Ybu Get The Job 



" We've been watching you, young man. We know 
you're made of the stuff that wins. The man that 
cares enough about his future to study an I. C. S. 
course in his spare time is the kind we want in this 
road's responsible positions. You're getting your 
promotion on what you kno<w, and I wish we had 
more like you. " »______»_ 

The boss can't take chances. When he has a re- 
sponsible job to fill, he picks a man trained to hold it. 
He's watch ingyou right now, hoping you'll be ready 
when the opportunity comes. 

The thing for you to do is to start today and train 
yourself to do some one thing better than others. 
You can do it in spare time through the International 
Correspondence Schools. Over 5000 men reported ad- 
vancement last year as a result of their I. C. S. training. 

The first step these men took was to mark and 
mail this coupon. Make your start the same way — 
and make it right now. 

^INTERNATIONAL 'coVREYpTNfE^SCHOOLS 

Box 8494, SCRANTON, PA. 

Explain, without obligating me, how I can qualify for the posi- 
tion, or in the subject, before which I mark X. 



□ LOCOMOTIVE ENGINEER 

□ Locomotive Fireman 

9 Traveling Engineei 
Traveling Fireman 

□ Air Brake Inspector 

□ Air Brake Repairman 

□ Round House Foreman 

□ Trainmen and Carmen 

□ Railway Conductor 

□ MECHANICAL ENGINEER 

□ Mechanical Draftsman 

□ Machine Shop Practice 
Boiler Maker or Designer 
Stationary Engineer 

Gas Engine Operating 
CIVIL ENGINEER 

□ Surveying and Mapping 

□ R. R. Constructing 

□ Bridge Engineer 

□ ARCHITECT 

□ Architectural Draftsman 

□ Contractor and Builder 

□ Structural Engineer 

□ Concrete Builder 

□ TRAFFIC MANAGER 



Name 

Occupation 
& Employer. 

Street 

and No 



□ R. R. 

□ R. R. 

□ Highe 



□ BOOKKEEPER 
Agency Accounting 
Gen'l Office Acc'ting 

er Accounting 
Stenographer and Typist 
Mathematics 
SALESMANSHIP 
ADVERTISING 
_ Railway Mail Clerk 

□ CIVIL SERVICE 

□ ELECTRICAL ENGINEER 
Electrician 

J Electric Wiring 

□ Electric Lighting 

□ Electric Railways 

□ Telegraph Engineer 

□ Telephone Work 

□ MINE FOREMAN OR ENG'R 

□ Metallurgist or Prospector 

□ CHEMIST 

□ AUTOMOBILE OPERATING 

□ Auto Repair! 



□ Good English 

□ AGRICULTURE 

□ Poultry Raising 



ng I 
I 

fREl 
s I 



□ Spanish 

□ German 

□ French 
I Italian 



I City. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



66 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




R. E. ROBERTSON AND RUSSELL DUNBAR, 
TELEGRAPH OPERATORS 



Piecework inspector Raymond Ocock, of 
Somerest, Pa., has resumed duty after a two 
weeks' vacation spent in Atlantic City, Phila- 
delphia, Baltimore and Washington. Old 
boy, we're glad to see you back. 

Raymond Gorman, supplyman at Somerest 
shops, expects to resume duty shortly, after 
having had an eye operation performed in a 
Baltimore Hospital. We all hope for his 
speedy recovery. 

A number of the railroad boys on the S. and C. 
answered the call and have subscribed for 
Liberty Loan Bonds. 

Effective June 1 F. W. Gettle was appointed 
storekeeper at Connellsville, vice W. E. Down- 
ing, transferred to another department. 

Effective June 16 John A. Davis, division 
accountant at Connellsville, was promoted to 
division accountant at New Castle Junction, 
vice H. B. Meager, assigned to other duties. 
He was succeeded by John H. Lindsay. 

The picture at top of page is of (left) R. E. 
Robertson, second trick operator atStoyestown 
and Russell Dunbar, second trick operator at 
Jerome Junction. 

The picture at bottom of page is of the em- 
ployes who work on Section 60. Reading from 
[eft to right, those in the picture are: W. E. 
Fowler, A. Phillips, G. EL Stillwagon, foreman, 
"Shorty" Graham, Carl Oliphant and George 
Phillips. 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondent, B. J. McQuade, Office of 
Superintendent, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. J. Bkadv Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

W. J. Kennedy Secretary 

C. C. Cook Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

E. J. Brennan Superintendent of Shops 

F. P. Pfahler Master Mechanic 

A. J. Weise General Car Foreman 

F. Bryne Claim Agent 

W. F. Deneke Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

R. F. Lang don Brakeman 

E. D. McCaughey Fireman 

E. P. Chenowith Conductor 

J. J. Berry Foreman, Glenwood 

J. L. Soliday Engineer 



Employes of the Pittsburgh Division extend 
their best wishes and hearty congratulations to 
Miss Leeda Corcoran, stenographer in the 
superintendent's office, and to C. R. Cunning- 
ham, a brakeman on the Pittsburgh Division, 
who were married on May 20. Friends of Miss 
Corcoran in the Pittsburgh office presented to 
her a fifty-seven piece silver set. May their 
married life be a happy and prosperous one! 

Miss Helen Smith and John Delehanty, a pipe 
fitter in the Glenwood shops, were married on 
June 20. Congratulations, Helen and John, and 
may your married life be one of sunshine and 
smiles. 

Discipline clerk Urner has announced his in- 
tention of employing an interpreter to manage 
one of his departments. He says that last 
month he received names of men that he could 
neither write or pronounce. 

Joseph Coursey, who has been promoted to 
clerk in the Tonnage Department, has rapidly 
become a man of much importance. He is full 
of business. Charles Kesner has been pro- 
moted to chief mail clerk, to fill the vacancy 
caused by Mr. Coursey's promotion. 




EMPLOYES ON SECTION No. 69 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



67 



Base Ball Team 

Off to a poor start — but coming strong. 

"Zip" Rogers is pitching wonderful ball, his 
latest feat being the holding of the Connells- 
ville team to five hits. Good work, "Zip." 

"Ham" White sure covers as much ground 
in the outfield as the grass. 

"Chief" Bennett's old time pep is a big factor 
to the young pitchers on the roster, and he is 
hitting the ball hard and regularly. 

"Mac" McCarthy's appearance in the Pitts- 
burgh uniform at Connellsville caused a lot of 
rejoicing, as he is a whale in the field and at 
the bat. 

"Ike" Tovey is covering acres of ground 
around second. His hitting is helping to keep 
the team in the running. Keep it up "Old 
Boy." 

"Cliff" Reynolds is playing the game of his 
life in his new position in the middle garden. 
His batting eye is good and you can always 
depend upon him to hit the ball square on the 
nose when he comes to the bat. 

Taken as a whole, the baseball team that 
represents the Pittsburgh Division this year 
is right on the job. Go to it, boys. 

Veteran Employes' Association 

A committee of veteran employes arranged a 
meeting on May 19 for men who had been in 
the employ of the Company for twenty years 
or more. G. W. Sturmer, of Baltimore, was 
invited to act as chairman. He gave an inter- 
esting talk, pointing out the object and benefits 
of the association and telling of what other 
divisions had accomplished. 

Sixty-two new members were enrolled at this 
meeting and we had the pleasure of electing 
our superintendent, T. J. Brady, an honorary 
member, as he has not been quite twenty years 
in the service. 

Mr. Brady assured the members that he was 
pleased to know that so many men had been in 
the employ of the Company for so many years 
and that he hoped that they would be able to 
serve for another twenty years. 

The following officers were elected for 1917: 
President, William Cox (an engineer with fifty- 
three years' service to his credit); vice-presi- 
dent, James Shook; secretary, George N. Orbin, 
and treasurer, William De Walt. 

The following executive committee was ap- 
pointed by president Cox: Frank Applebee, 
chairman; J. D. Beltz, W. F. Deneke, C. B. 
Lane, D. Burns, H. Dorsey, G. Kane, W. A. 
Cooper, G. Carruthers and T. F. Donohue. 

The executive committee met on June 1 and 
15, and have adopted by-laws to govern the 
association. They have arranged to hold 
quarterly meetings. 

There are now 115 members, and as there are 
about 1,000 men on the Pittsburgh Division 
who have served for twenty years or more, the 
association expects to reach the 500 mark. 




A NOON HOUR SOCIAL GATHERING 
AT GLENWOOD SHOPS 



Superintendent Brady has written to A. R. 
Hepler, agent at Shippenville, and J. W. Smith, 
agent at Chicora, congratulating them on the 
very satisfactory condition of their accounts, 
developed at a recent examination. 

Effective June 1 J. B. Layne was appointed 
assistant storekeeper at Foxburg, Pa., vice A. 
D. Rosier, transferred. 

Happenings in Pittsburgh Yard 

Thomas Farrell, our general foreman at 10th 
Street turntable, is having his office enlarged 
and painted. 

We are all wondering why extra brakeman 
"Mugsy" McGraw is wearing that especially 
pleasant smile. He has not said anything to 
any of us — but they both looked pretty happy 
coming down 5th Avenue the other day. 

Did you see that smoky on the 1525 in his 
new uniform on Decoration Day? Some class ! 

Here is wishing all the luck in the world to 
brakeman John J. Dudas and his war garden. 

Fireman J. W. Collins was very busy at' the 
polls on June 5, Registration Day. He is a 
strong advocate of universal military training. 

Fireman Steadman says that he would like 
to go to the war. Well, good stuff often comes 
in small packages. Have you noticed how 
proudly he shows that little blue card? 



Glenwood Shops 

Correspondent, Frank Rush 

The picture at top of page is of a social 
gathering at noon hour. Those in the picture, 
reading from left to right, are: top row — 
cabinetmaker H. E. Zinsmaster; carpenter 
J. H. Brooks; passenger car foreman P. J. 
Finke, and passenger car inspector P. Murray. 
Bottom row — assistant storekeeper J. Ference; 
shop track foreman H. L. Ellis; painter A. 
Smith and assistant foreman A. R. Riecoff. 
R. Keetley, our camera fiend, took the picture. 



6S 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



A. H. Keys, formerly M. C. B. clerk at Glen- 
wood, has been promoted to a position in Mr. 
Pryor's office, at Baltimore. We wish him 
success in his new work. 

Born to boilermaker and Mrs. William 
Mertz, a boy. "Bill" has been in our service 
for twelve years and is well liked. 

J. F. Haggerty, formerly roundhouse foreman 
at Glenwood, has been promoted to general 
foreman at Cleveland. We wish him success 
in his new position. 

T. E. Wible, formerly general piecework 
inspector at Glenwood, has been promoted to 
machine shop foreman. 

John Roseley, who was employed in the 
Stores Department, died a short time ago. 
It was with great regret that we heard of his 
death and his parents have our heartfelt sym- 
pathy. 

The accompanying picture is of our power 
plant engineer, C. H. Simpson, and his electrical 
repairman. Mr. Simpson has been at Glen- 
wood for but a short time, but he has made 
many friends. These two young men have made 
the Glenwood power plant a success and we are 
sure that they will continue their good work. 



New Castle Division 

Correspondent, J. A. Lloyd, Chief Clerk 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. W. YanHorn Chairman, Superintendent 

C. P. Anoell Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 




GLENWOOD SHOTS POWER PLANT 
ENGINEER SIMPSON AND HIS REPAIRMAN 



J. J. McGuire Master Mechanic 

T. K. Faherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Dr. F. Dorse y Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Division Claim Agent 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahill Division Operator 

W. Damron Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 
E. F. Toepfer Road Engineer 

G. T. Griffith Road Fireman 

H. A. Bradley Road Conductor 

S. K. Fielding Yard Engineer 

L. Whalen Pipefitter 

J. W. Ferron Work Checker, Car Department 



James J. McGuire, for the last four years 
master mechanic of the New Castle Division, 
applied for and has received a commission as 
Captain in the Shopmen's Regiment which is 
being recruited for service on the French 
railroads. 

Captain McGuire was born in Youngstown 
on August 5, 1881, and entered the service of 
the Baltimore and Ohio as a boiler washer in 
1895, becoming successively machinist appren- 
tice, machinist, engine house foreman, general 
foreman and master mechanic. With the 
exception of six months in 1907, his entire 
life's work has been on our road. 

The New Castle Division, to a man, are glad 
to know that one of their number is to have 
charge of this important work in France, and 
that the work will be well done. Captain 
McGuire is a very forceful and energetic young 
man, and having come up from the ranks we 
are all the more glad to see his progress. We 
know that he will make good. 

The employes at Haselton yard held a flag 
raising on May 14. The ceremony was well 
attended. Engineer N. L. Rees made an 
exceptionally able speech. We would like to 
print it in the Employes Magazine, but lack 
of space forbids. 

Effective June 16 A. H. Hodges was ap- 
pointed master mechanic of the New Castle 
Division, with headquarters at New Castle 
Junction, vice J. J. McGuire, furloughed. 

On June 1 the joint arrangement with the 
Pennsylvania Lines, whereby the Baltimore and 
Ohio used the tracks and East Side Station of 
that line in New Castle, was cancelled and our 
new passenger depot in the Seventh Ward of 
New Castle (formerly Mahoningtown) was 
publicly opened for traffic. The exercises in 
connection with the opening were in charge of 
the Mahoningtown Commercial Club, one of 
the most wideawake and active organizations 
in New Castle. 

The exercises were preceded by a parade of 
about fifty well filled automobiles, which 
< reversed the main part of the city. The 
public schools in the Seventh Ward were 
closed and (he school children gave ;i May pole 
dance and flag drill in the public park, which is 
directly opposite the new station. Addresses 
were made by Mayor A. D. Newell, of New 
Castle, city superintendent of schools George 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



69 



Let This Man Train You 

For A Bi£ 

Traffic Position 




Faculty 



N. D. Chapin 

Formerly Chief of Tariff Bureau 
of the New York Central Railroad 
and West Shore Railroad. 

R. E. Riley 

Formerly Instructor in Railway 
Transportation at Y. M. C. A., 
New York City: formerly with 
the I.C. R. R-, N\Y. C. Lines, C. 
N.O.& T. P. Ry., C. H. &D. 
Ry.,andB.&0. S. W. R. R.,and 
S. P. Co.— Atlantic Steamship 
Lines. 

G. F. Falley, A. B. 

Formerly General Freight and 
Passenger Agent of the 
B. &N.W. Railway. 

John P. Curran, LL.B. 

Central Freight Association: for- 
merly with Southwestern Tariff 
Committee, St. Louis. 

F. R. Garrison 

Chief Clerk, Central Freight As- 
sociation: formerly with L. E. & 
W. R. R\, C. H.&D. Ry., and 
G. R. & I- Ry. 
J. W. Harnach 
Formerly with C. M. St. P. Ry., 
and Chicago Great Western R. R, 

L. E. O'Brien, Ph. B. 
Formerly Industrial Traffic Mgr. 

Text Writers 

(Partial List) 

E. R. Dewtnup, A. B. A. M. 

Professor of Railway Administra- 
tion, The University of Illinois; 
Author of Freight Classification. 

A. R. Smith 

Vice- Pres., Louisville & Nash- 
ville Railroad; Author of Freight 
Rates in Southern Territory. 

W. H. Chandler 

Manager Transportation Bureau 
Boston Chamber of Commerce: 
Author of The ExpresB Service 
and Rates. 

B. Olney Hough 

Editor, American Exporter; Au- 
thor of Ocean Traffic and Trade, 

C. C. McCain 

Chairman, Trunk Line Associa- 
tion; Joint Author of Freight 
Rates— Official Classification 
Territory. 

C. S. Sikes 

General Auditor, Pere Marquette 
Railroad; Author of Railway 
Accounting. 

J. F. Morton 

Asst. Traffic Director, Chicago 
■ Association of Commerce;Author 
of Routing Freight Shipments. 

C. L. Lingo 

Traffic Manager, Inland Steel Co 

The complete LaSalle or 
ganization consists of more 
than 300 business experts 
professional men, text wri 
ters, instructcrs and assist 
antSjincluding recognized au 
thonties in all departments 



Over 25,000 



ambitious men in all lines of railroad and industrial 
traffic work, throughout the United States, have 
benefited through membership in our Department of Inter- 
state Commerce and Railway traffic. More than 



$150,000 



has been expended by our institution in organizing and per- 
fecting the training and service rendered members of this 
department, which is now under the direct, personal super- 
vision of 

MR. N. D. CHAPIN 

Formerly Chief of Tariff Bureau, New York Central Lines 

Mr Chapin has been engaged to devote his entire time to 
this work, and is assisted by a selected corps of railroad and 
industrial traffic experts, together with an organization of 
more than 300 people. . . 

LaSalle Training Fully Recognized 

The LaSalle Course in Interstate Commerce and Railway 
Traffic is now fully recognized by the country's greatest 
traffic authorities as the highest type of traffic training now 
available. It has been adopted as representing the highest 
standard of technical training, information and practice, in 
the matter of Interstate Commerce, railway and industrial 
management, in important traffic centers and is approved 
by many trur>k railroads, such as the following: 

Baltimore & Ohio R. R. , Louisville & Nashville R.R. 
Cumberland Valley R. R., ErieR. R. 
Pennsylvania Lines West 

The course is a complete, up-to-date, and thoroughly 
practical system of training, covering all phases of modern 
traffic operations. It is a "100 man power" course, con- 
ducted by thoroughly qualified traffic experts who have risen 
from the ranks. No other course compares with it. Should 
not be confused with so-called traffic clubs or traffic associa- 
tions. Hundreds of men are now holding big positions and 
drawing greatly increased salaries as a direct result of 
LaSalle training and service. 

A few of the many LaSalle Students Now Industrial 
Traffic Managers: W. S. Epply, Traffic Manager, Hammer- 
mill Paper Co., Erie, Pa.; T. J. Bennett, Traffic Manager, 
American Steel Foundries, Chicago; P. D. Siverd, Traffic 
Mgr., The Garland Corp., Pittsburg; R. P. Muller, Traffic 
Mgr., U. S. Light and Heating Co., Niagara Falls, N. Y.; 
J. D. Quinn, Traffic Mgr., Franklin Steel Works, Franklin, 
Pa.; Thos. S. Barry. Traffic Mgr. for the Pawtucket Board 
of Trade, Pawtucket, R. I.; Seth Tate, Traffic Mgr., Higgin- 
botham, Bailey-Logan Co., Dallas, Texas; K. L. Crickman, 
Traffic Mgr., Great Western Smelting & Refining Co., St. 
Louis; Alex. Denholm, Traffic Mgr., The Lakewood Engineer- 
ing Co., Cleveland; R. H. Culbertson, Traffic Mgr., Seattle 
Construction & Dry Dock Co., Seattle, Wash. 

Send Coupon Traffic Book 

Send now for big illustrated traffic book giving full particulars Minn r> • »t . 
regarding our course of instruction by mail, opportunities open, M LaSalle extension University 
salaries paid, etc. There is no obligation on your part. Book and m n^ -,* 7^«.r" ru:~*.„~ III 

all information sent free. Act promptly. Special reduced rate M Ue P 1 ' ' *° *~ ^nicago, 111. 

w TL^ n w2?f I 1 ^ onthly P^ent P lai > open to those ^Please send FREE proof about oppor- 
enrollmg now. Write today. JTtunities now open to TRAFFIC EX- 

» PERTS with LaSalle trainintr. 



NORMAN D. CHAPIN 



Read This Letter From A ^ 
Known Traffic Official 

"If the information in the in- 
closed clipping (referring to Mr. 
Chapin's appointment as head of 
thedepartmentof Interstate Com- 
merce and Railway Traffic) from 
"The Pittsburgh Dispatch" today 
is correct, I wish to extend sincere 
congratulations to yourself and 
the University in the selection of 
Mr. N. D. Chapin for the position 
mentioned. I consider Mr. Chapin 
not-only one of the best-informed 
rate and tariff men in the country, 
but also possessed of alltheneces- 
sary personal qualifications to en- 
gage successfully in the good 
work of your University. 

F. S. DAVIS, 
Gen'l Western Freight and 
Passenger Agent, 
N. Y., N. H. &H. R. R. 

Other Prominent Railroad Men 
Endorse LaSalle Training 

"Your enterprise has my en- 
tire approval." 

E. P. RIPLEY, Pres., 
Santa Fe Ry. 
"I unhesitatingly recommend 
your course to anyone." 

H. J. STEEPLE, Gen'l Agt. 

Erie Railroad. 
"I have no hesitancy in saying 
that any student taking the course 
and diligently and studiously ap- 
plying himself to the task of ab- 
sorbing the information, cannot 
help being benefited and his effi- 
ciency will be increased." 
W.H.PAXT0N. Gen'l Frt. Agt., 
Southern Ry., Atlanta, Ga. 

Among others who endorse our 
course are: E. T. Campbell, Gen'l 
Traffic Mgr., Erie Railroad; James 
Webster, Ass't Freight Traffic 
Manager., N. Y. C. Lines; R. H. 
Drake, Division Freight Agent, 
American Can Co.: etc., etc. 



Mail Coupon NOW 



LaSALLE EXTENSION UNIVERSITY 

"The World's Greatest Extension University" 

Dept. 738-C Chicago, III 



fj^ Occupation 



ft 

J0 City........ 

Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




EXERCISES AT THE OPENING OF OUR NEW PASSENGER STATION AT NEW CASTLE 



A. Dickson, Company's counsel Wylie McCas- 
lin, and general passenger agent B. N. Austin. 

Among the officers of the Baltimore and 
Ohio present were B. N. Austin, general pas- 
senger agent, assistant general passenger agent 
J. P. Taggart, traveling passenger agent W. H. 
Foust, trainmaster C. P. Angell and division 
operator W. P. Cahill. General superin- 
tendent Cahill and superintendent Van Horn 
were unable to be present. After the exercises 
Mr. Foust displayed the travel pictures of the 
Passenger Department, the Crescent Theater 
being donated by Messrs. McDougall and 
Wray for the occasion. Mr. McDougall was 
formerly assistant trainmaster on the New 
Castle Division and is now passenger conductor. 
The town was decorated for the occasion and 
the opening of the station was made a public 
holiday. The townspeople and the employes 
of the Company are proud of the new station, 
which is modern and up-to-date in every respect. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, P. G. Ervin, Assistant 
Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

.1. H. Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Garrett, Ind. 

T. J. Rogers. . . . Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

T. E. Jamison Trainmaster 

John Tordella Division Engineer 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

D. P>. Taylor Master Carpenter Garrett, Ind. 

W. F. Mohan Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

I ) Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

W. A I'Vvk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

C. W. IIkuki' k Medical Examiner, Chicago Jet., O. 

R. R. Jenkins Secretary Y. M. C. A., Chicago Jet., O. 

John Draper Freight Agent, Chicago, III. 

Henry Berosthom Machinist, South Chicago, III. 

J. D. Jack Claim Agent, Garrett, Ind 

W. P. Allman Agent, Avilla, Ind. 

C. A. Hamilton .. Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

C. H Kmn Fireman, Garrett, Ind. 

V D. SOOTI .Conductor, Deshler, (). 

Dated Waomir . Brakemaai Garrett, ind. 

I'obert Kfff Yard Bnikcrnan, Chicago Jet .,< >. 

W A Miller Car Builder, Garrett, Ind. 

I- C. Beeber Pipefitter, Garrett, Ind. 

J r/Lius Leatz Pipefitter, Chicago Jet., O. 

R. A. Kleiht Gang Foreman, South Chicago, III. 



The accompanying picture is of Michael J. 
Hallinan, passenger conductor on the Chicago 
Division. Mr. Hallinan was born in Trenton, 
N. J., on August 19, 1855, and began work for 
the Baltimore and Ohio as a laborer at the time 
the Chicago Division was being constructed 
in 1873, working between Chicago Junction and 
Attica, Ohio. He began work as a road brake- 
man as soon as the road was finished, running 
between Chicago Junction and Defiance, Ohio. 
In 1879 he was promoted to freight conductor 
and ran locals and through freight trains until 
June, 1883, when he was promoted to passenger 
conductor, the position which he still holds. 

From June, 1883, to May, 1887, Mr. Hallinan 
ran trains from Chicago, Illinois, to Detroit, 
Michigan, over the Baltimore and Ohio and 
Wabash Railroads via Auburn Junction, 
Indiana, the junction point of the Baltimore 
and Ohio and Wabash Railroads at that 
time. Baltimore and Ohio trains at that time 
were run on what was known as Columbus time 
and Wabash trains were run on Chicago time 




M. J 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



71 



there being a difference of nineteen minutes 
between the two times. Because of this 
difference in time it was necessary for all 
Chicago Division trainmen to have an extra 
hand put on theii watches. When the practice 
of i iinning trains from Chicago to Detroit was 
discontinued, Mr. Hallinan ran trains from 
Chicago to Wheeling, W. Va. In 1890 another 
change was made and trains were run from 
Chicago to Chicago Junction, the practice 
which is still in effect. 

Mr. Hallinan has been in continuous service 
for over forty-three years and has a clear 
record. In addition to this he also holds 
letters of recommendation from the Wabash, 
St. Louis and Pacific Railway Company (now 
the Wabash Railway Company) expressing 
their appreciation of the gentlemanly and 
courteous manner in which he discharged his 
duties while running trains over the rails of 
that company. It is needless to say that his 
work has always been highly appreciated by 
the officials of our Company. 

Sylvester V. McKennan and Miss Helen 
Frances Shultz, both of Garrett, were married 
at Auburn, Ind., on June 13. Mr. McKennan 
is employed as chief timekeeper m the office of 
the division accountant and Miss Shultz is 
the daughter of division operator F. N. Shultz. 
We wish them a long and happy wedded life. 

Edwin S. Rupp and Miss Beatrice Bowers, 
both of Garrett, were married at Waterloo, 
Indiana, on June 17. Mr. Rupp is employed as 
motive power accountant in the office of the 
division accountant and Miss Bowers is the 
daughter of city clerk C. U. Bowers, who was 
for many years an employe of this Company. 
We all join in wishing them a long and happy 
married life. 

Registration Day, June 5, was a great day in 
Garrett and there was much enthusiasm. 
At ten o'clock that morning all of the office 
employes collected in front of the passenger 
station and marche.d to the various polling 
places, accompanied by the Garrett Band. 
In this way all the young men between the 
ages of twenty-one and thirty-one were regis- 
tered and given a banner on which was inscribed 
"I have registered, have you?" We are 
pleased to say that so far we do not know of 
any "slackers" being found in this county. 

Liberty Loan Bonds amounting to several 
thousand dollars have been purchased by 
employes at Garrett on the installment plan as 
described in Mr. Willard's circular letter of 
May 31. By purchasing these bonds on the 
monthly payment plan it was possible for many 
of us to take advantage of the offer, which we 
could not have done otherwise, and we extend 
our thanks to the management for the interest 
taken in order to permit so many to do their 
"bit" for the preservation of Democracy and 
to uphold the Star Spangled Banner, which 
we hope will never know defeat. In this con- 
nection it may be well to state that no trouble 




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ADVERTISING 
ANNOUNCEMENT 

We cordially invite all employes to inspect 
carefully the advertising now appearing in 
our Magazine. It is our purpose to offer 
only such things as will legitimately appeal 
to the rank and file of our readers. All 
advertising will be rigidly examined before 
insertion so that there may be no question 
about its standard. No objectionable adver- 
tising will be accepted :: :: :: :: 

ADVERTISING RATES 
$35.00 per page, each insertion and pro rata 
for halves, quarters and eighths and $2.19 per 
inch (fourteen agate lines to an inch, one- 
sixteenth page). Width of column, 16 ems 
or 2f inches. 

Rates for covers, extra colors and preferred 
positions will be supplied on request. 



For further particulars address 

Robert M. Van Sant, Advertising Manager 
Mount Royal Station Baltimore, 



Md. 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




THE ATTRACTIVE HOME OF 
ENGINEER G. C. WHITE 



is being encountered in securing our allotment 
for the Red Cross Fund and all the solicitors 
are meeting with great success. The people 
are certainly to be commended for their willing- 
ness in aiding the Government. Those of us 
who are unable to go to war can do our "bit" 
by giving freely and we should not do it grudg- 
ingly. 

The accompanying picture is of the home of 
G. C. White, passenger engineer on this divi- 
sion. Mr. White has been in continuous service 
for the last thirty-one years and has a service 
record that any employe might well be proud 
of. This home, like many others in Garrett, 
was purchased through the Relief Department. 

At the regular monthly meeting of the 
Safety First committee of the Chicago Divi- 
sion, held at Chicago Junction, Ohio, on 
Wednesday, June 6, were present, in addition 
to the regular members, Honorable F. L. 
Dawson, mayor; Dr. D. W. Rumbaugh, post- 
master; J. Milburn, assistant secretary of the 
Y. M. C. A.; L. E. Simons, merchant and D. F. 
Stevens, superintendent of the Newark Divi- 
sion. In the absence of superintendent Jackson, 
the meeting was presided over by vice-chairman 
T. J. Rogers. After the regular routine of 
business the committee was addressed by 
Mayor Dawson, who spoke very highly of what 
he considers the admirable work that has been 
done by our Company through its Safety 
First campaign. Mr. Dawson concluded his 
talk by expressing the hope that the amiable 
relations existing between the city of Chicago 
Junction and the Baltimore and Ohio may be 
continued. A vote of thanks was tendered the 
mayor and other citizens of Chicago Junction 
for their attendance; also to the assistant 
secretary of the Y. M. C. A. for his kindness in 
arranging for the use of the K. of P. hall and 
the services of the ladies, who served a dinner 
to the committee and their guests. The meet- 
ing adjourned at 11.30 a. m. 

The accompanying picture is of carpenter 
foreman ]•). J. Stuck and his gang. It was 
taken while they wen; at work on bridge 181-5, 
Dear Bremen, Indiana. This work is being done 



in connection with the second track improve- 
ment between Milford Junction and La Paz 
Junction, and is fast nearing completion. The 
picture also shows our pile driver and crew. 
Mr. Stuck has been in the service of the Com- 
pany for the last thirty years and is one of our 
most efficient carpenter foremen. His men are 
among the best carpenters on the Chicago 
Division and are always on the job. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

By far the most important event of the 
season was the flag raising at our South Chicago 
shops on May 19. 

The flag was purchased by the employes and 
the affair was held under the auspices of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Safety and Social Club. 
The military effect was emphasized by the 
presence of a number of soldiers, who occupied 
the stage with chief operating engineer T. H. 
Berry, who made an address on "Patriotism" 
and referred to the fact that the Baltimore 
and Ohio was the first railroad to offer its 
services to the government sixty years ago, 
during the Civil War. 

The flag was raised by George Miller, Thomas 
Daley and George Lemon, veteran employes. 
Arrangements were made with the Illinois 
Steel Company employes, who were also 
celebrating a flag raising, to stop their parade 
and the band played patriotic airs while our 
flag was hoisted to the breeze. A good crowd 
was in attendance, the citizens of South Chicago 
turning out in large numbers. 

The employes at this station have responded 
liberally to the appeal of the government for 
the purchase of Liberty Bonds. Those of us 
who took advantage of the offer to subscribe 
on monthly payments appreciate very much 
the privilege offered us by the Company, which 
enabled us to express our patriotism in this 
way. 




CARPENTER FOREMAN E. J. STUCK 
AND HIS MEN 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 




R. E. McCREA 



Through the efforts of Mrs. Spreenburg, our 
popular stenographer, we have all become 
members of the Red Cross. Agent Altherr is 
very much gratified with the results which she 
obtained in her work for this worthy cause. 

A. E. Pollard, one of our veteran employes, 
who for ten years was cashier at this station 
and was recently appointed chief clerk to train- 
master Huggins, has resigned to accept a 
position with another railroad. Mr. Pollard 
won the confidence and respect of all his 
associates, who regret seeing him leaving the 
service. Edward Murphy succeeds him as 
chief clerk. 

The Company has added to its Safety First 
work on this division a First Aid corps com- 
posed of men from the different departments. 
A number of meetings have been held and 
under the efficient training of our medical 
examiner, Dr. E. J. Hughes, the members are 
able to give immediate relief to any case of 
injury which comes to their attention. 

Henry Bergstorm, of the Mechanical Depart- 
ment, known as "The Safety First Man," is 
chairman, with F. J. Kroll, work checker, and 
Stanley Biejgrowicz, engine house checker, as 
his assistants. 



Chicago Terminal 

Correspondent, R. G. Clark, Assistant 
Abstracter, Chicago 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. L. Nichols Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Dacy Trainmaster 

CP. Palmer Division Engineer 

F. E. Lampherb Assistant Engineer 

Alex. Craw Division Claim Agent 

W. J. Wainman Captain of Police 

C. L. Hegley Examiner and Recorder 

H. McDonald Supervisor, Chicago Division 

Wm. Hogan Supervisor, Calumet Division 

F. K. Moses Master Mechanic 



F. S. DeVeny Road Foreman of Engines 

Chas. Esping Master Carpenter 

Dr. E.J. Hughes Medical Examiner 

CO. Seifert Signal Supervisor 

Morris Altherr Assistant Agent, Forest Hill 

J. O. Callahan General Car Foreman 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

O. E. Burger Engine Foreman, East Chicago, Ind. 

F. Foley Engine Foreman, Blue Island, 111. 

J. Wise Engine Foreman, Robey Street 

John Bickel Engineer, Robey Street 

M. J. McHugh Fireman, Robey Street 

Thos. Kennedy Engineer, East Chicago, Ind. 

Fred Krause Fireman, East Chicago, Ind. 

H. J. Masse Machinist, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. E. Lowry Boilermaker, East Chicago, Ind. 

W. Bock Machinist, Robey Street 

D. W. Alderman Car Inspector, Robey Street 



The accompanying picture is of section 
foreman R. E. McCrea, who has been in the 
service of the Baltimore and Ohio for thirty- 
seven years, and who now has charge of Sec- 
tion 68 on the Chicago Terminal. Throughout 
this long period of service Mr. McCrea has 
always considered the Baltimore and Ohio's 
interests paramount to his personal comfort, 
and he is a member of that valuable class of 
employes who can always be depended upon to 
meet any emergency. 

C. J. Schwendener, assistant chief clerk in the 
district engineer's office, is receiving the con- 
gratulations of his friends upon the arrival of a 
fine baby boy at his home on June 17. 

Frank Ruth, wheelage clerk in the car 
accounting office, has returned from a vacation 
spent at Minong, Wisconsin. 

The accompanying picture is of James Edward 
Hande, the son of J. H. Hande, assistant en- 
gineer in the Valuation Department. Mr. 
Hande, Sr., says that Mr. Hande, Jr., who is 
one year old, already shows great engineering 
ability, being especially^adept in the^construc- 
tion of mud pies. 




JAMES EDWARD HANDE 
Son of J. H. Hande 



74. THE BALTIMORE AND (X 

Assistant engineer F. E. Lamphere has been 
commissioned a Major in the Quartermaster 
Department of the United States Army. Mr. 
Lamphere' s experience in construction work 
will prove invaluable at this time, and both he 
and the Government are to be congratulated. 

Results in the Chicago Railroad Baseball 
League: June 9 — Chicago Terminal 3; C. B. & 
Q. 2. June 16— C. M. & St. P. 6; Chicago 
Terminal 3. 

O. J. Lozo, chief clerk in the car accounting 
office, is wearing a particularly broad smile 
these days, the result of a visit of the stork to 
his home on May 28, when he was presented 
with an eight and one-half pound baby girl. 
Her name is Lorraine. 

P. F. Finnegan, H. White, Jr., P. Meininger, 
H. Burg, H. E. Hansen and O. J. Lozo re- 
cently made their first trip to the lakes of 
Wisconsin, their particular destination this 
time being Stone Lake. The fact that they 
shipped home sixteen bass and eleven muske- 
longe is evidence that their trip w r as not entirely 
in vain. 

Every Chicago Terminal employe who 
subscribed to the Liberty Loan (and almost 
everyone did), may feel justifiably proud in 
knowing that his "bit" helped swell the enor- 
mous over-subscription which announced to 
Kaiser "Bill ' the fact that we aren't entirely 
asleep over here. And there's lots more where 
that came from, right on the Terminal here, 
"Bill." 

R. H. Alvery and Roger Blue, rodmen in the 
district engineer's office, have enlisted in army 
service. 

The correspondent will be very grateful to 
anyone sending him the names of employes 
who have entered Government service, notice 
of which has not appeared in the Magazine. 

Effective June 1 F. W. Reynolds was ap- 
pointed storekeeper at East Chicago, vice 
\\ . D. Stone, resigned to accept service with 
another company. 

The Redoubtable Roy G. Clark, Author, 
Attacked by Fighting Pacifist 

"A few weeks ago, while the office was deeply 
engaged in its work and even Clark, who 
manages to accomplish much work against 
great odds* and without visible effort, was 
exceedingly absorbed in abstracting. Suddenly 
a thundering voice, with great elanl, inquired 
for Mr. Clark. 'Present,' cried Clark, 'in his 
inimitable manner.' The caller then intro- 
duced himself as the Rev. — of the 

■ — Church. 

"Now, it seems that Roy had read a sermon of 
this reverend gentleman in which he branded 
soldiers as 'murderers.' Decidedly this 
was not Roy's opine, and he had promptly 

* Not.- on Hm. in unknown handwriting, "Ain't it the 
truth!" 

J Editor's note : "Whatd'ye mean dan?" 



O EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 

indicted a fire-eating epistle, signing his right 
name, his office address (we wonder he did not 
include his photograph), and had promptly 
cleared his mind of the matter. 

"The minister started in gently by grasping 
tightly both lapels of Clark's coat. At first 
Roy's voice was cheery, confident and some- 
what defiant. But the minister was evidently 
determined to fight for pacifism. Roy was not 
able to say a word after the passionate pacifist 
began to talk. Finally we heard him begging 
the pacifist-preacher's pardon and we knew 
Roy had fallen to the argument. 

"Clark says he (the pacifist) was in earnest 
'all right' and that the pacifist would let an 
enemy kill him, even if he had a gun in his hand. 
Clark may have absorbed some of these theories, 
but they will no doubt wear off in a few days. 

"We suggest that the next time he is attacked 
with a desire to write such a hot letter he give 
the name and address of some fair demoiselle, 
instead of his own." 

When the foregoing letter was received in the 
Magazine office ye ed. scratched his Head in 
doubt. Was its publication likely to lead to 
bloodshed? At last we decided to ask Mr. 
Clark's opinion on the matter. Here is his 
reply to our inquiry. 

"I am deeply grieved at the perfidy of my 
one-time friends, as displayed in the attached 
'piece.' Now I know how our President felt, 
after having spent two years trying to make the 
Huns act like human beings, and then having 
them turn on him worse than ever. 

"You ask whether I think the reverend dom- 
inie will take this incident in the right manner 
if it is published. It seems to me that if I don't 
kick he certainly shouldn't, for he gets entirely 
the best of the argument according to this 
version. 

"I might make a lengthy denial, or at least 
insist that this is a very garbled version of the 
affair — but what's the use! Sufficient it is to 
say that the dominie and myself agreed to 
amicably disagree, but — if he calls any more of 
our boys "murderers" I'll write him another 
letter like the last one, and be proud of the 
chance. Yours very sincerely, 

R. G. Clark. 

P. S. — The culprit who wrote this about me is 
a mighty clever fellow, who expects to go to 
France with our forces as an interpreter." 



Ohio Division 

Correspondent, W. L. Allison, Operator 
C. D. OJJice, Chillicothc, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 



A A Iamm Chairman, Superintendent 

R. M allen Road Foreman of Engines 

II K. Ghkenwood Master Mechanic 

C. II R. Howe Division Engineer 

T. E. Ban km Trainmaster 

I)h. V. H. Wkidkmann Medical Examiner 

L. A. Pausch Supervisor 

L. B. Manss Captain of Police 

L. Keoahh Road Conductor 

C. Skinner Road Brakeman 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



75 




"CATCHING SUCKERS" IS A POPULAR 
SPORT IN MANY PLACES 
These were caught in the Scioto River by (from left to 
right): W. L. Allison, E. E. Hart and A. E. Combs 



S. B. Frost Road Engineer 

L. W. Schaffer Road Fireman 

H. L. Shea Yard Fireman 

J. Shane Machinist 

J. Rutherford Tank Repairman 

S. Griffin Agent, Hillsboro 

Effective May 23 B. W. Sands and W. A. 
Bums, freight conductors, and R. R. Schwarzel, 
train dispatcher, were appointed transportation 
supervisors on the Ohio Division, with head- 
quarters at Athens, Midland City and Hamden, 
respectively. They will take general charge of 
the yards at those points, see that the switch- 
ing and placing of incoming loads and empties 
is done so as to facilitate the movement of 
through freights and locals which fill out there, 
thus avoiding delays. Their efforts are already 
showing good results. 

A Greenfield switcher and a Hamden turn 
around, with Chillicothe as a terminal, have 
been added to the list of freight runs, relieving 
locals of the switching and picking up between 
these points and permitting them to make their 
runs in good time. 

Seven machinists and apprentices from the 
Chillicothe shops left for the east on June 13 
for service in France with the Shop Regiment. 
As the train pulled out of the station their 
brother machinists lined up in front of the shops 
to cheer them and wave good-bye. 

On May 30 first No. 97, engine 2750, in charge 
of conductor B. B. Stevens, engineer John 
Gregg and fireman R. Mather, made the run 
from Parkersburg to Chillicothe, a distance of 
97.4 miles, in two hours and thirty-seven min- 
utes without making a stop or taking water. 
No. Vs time from Parkersburg to Chillicothe 
is two hours and twenty minutes, so this can 
be considered an exceptionally good run. It 
was good enough to clip just thirteen minutes 
from the former record of No. 97. 

Dr. F. H. Weidemann, medical examiner at 
Chillicothe, has been transferred to a like 
position at Connellsville, Pa. Dr. J. G. Selby, 
from Camden Station, Baltimore, Md., will 
take his place here. 



There are fourteen women now employed in 
the Chillicothe shops. Their duties consist 
of wiping engines, cleaning coaches, etc. 

The following telegrapher's and agent's 
positions have been rilled as per the May 
bulletin: West Junction, third trick operator, 
H. Peecher; Musselman, agent-operator, J. D. 
Henson; Oak Hill, agent, P. P. Potts; Grosve- 
nor, agent-operator, H. H. Hulbert. 

The cooperative store is now a reality. A 
large store room on East Main Street has been 
rented and is being put in shape for immediate 
occupancy. By the time this appears in print 
business will have started in full blast and the 
battle against old "Hi Cost" will be on. 

The passenger traffic of the C. H. & D. will 
be routed via the main line of the Baltimore 
and Ohio at Musselman, west of Chillicothe, 
and at Vause's Station, east, entering the city 
at the Union Station. By making up trains in 
the east end of the local yards and sending a 
large part of the westbound freight over the 
C. H. & D. lines from West Junction or Vause's 
Station to Musselman, the congestion in the 
Chillicothe yards, particularly at Main Street, 
will be eliminated. 

And now, watch us grow. A Government 
military cantonment will be built near Chilli- 
cothe, situated directly on the Baltimore and 
Ohio. This is a large order and will mean a 
huge increase in freight and passenger traffic 
for the local division to take care of. The 
construction contracts for the big camp, in- 
volving, as they do, expenditures of more than 
four million dollars and requiring approximately 
4,000 carloads of material to be brought to the 
site, will cause the Ohio Division to build 
several miles of track to handle this business. 
A new station will probably be built out at the 
Kite track entrance to the camp, which will be 
a city in itself. The cantonment, when com- 
pleted, will comprise one thousand barrack 
buildings, enough to house forty thousand men. 
Twelve thousand horses will be brought here 
for training purposes, and this means an average 
of two hundred carloads of supplies and provi- 
sions to be handled each day over the Baltimore 
and Ohio. 

Employes of the Ohio Division were saddened 
by the news of the death of passenger conductor 
Daniel Touhy, who died in his home in Price 
Hill, Cincinnati, on June 3, after a brief illness. 

Mr. Touhy was born on February 4, 1856, 
and entered the service as a freight brakeman 
on May 26, 1873. He was promoted succes- 
sively to train baggagemaster, freight conduc- 
tor, general yardmaster at Cincinnati, and to 
passenger conductor in March, 1912. His 
clear record from the date he entered the 
service, his alertness and close attention to the 
business of handling the trains he had charge of 
and his unfailing courtesy to all those with 
whom he came in contact, won for him the 
admiration and respect of officials and employes 
alike. The sympathy of the entire Division is 
extended to his bereaved family. 



7G 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Courtesy Pays 



11 ii 

I I By Harry Feinstein 

| | Superintendent, The Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton Storage Warehouses 



j I /^UR department is deriving additional revenue and many other benefits by extend- 

| I ing COURTESIES to our patrons. Whenever possible we try to stretch a point I f 

j I and to accommodate. Our business has been built up by so doing. We have found 1 I 

j | this to be appreciated and not forgotten by our customers. Now, in the interest of both I 1 

| j the Baltimore and Ohio and The Cincinnati, Hamilton and Dayton, let's all get together I ! 

I I and think of this and other methods to increase the earnings of our roads. 

□ □ I ™ M mm d mnBMHMDii cimannocii c: r» mmci t. C ;,.,..,.«,..c: 1 « ,u,™„„ D „„ IC Dmmmmm lltJ oimmimcmmnmcm □M.mnowin.i.o.im.Mm □ □ 



C. W. Bailey, agent-operator at Madisonville, 
Ohio, after forty-three years of service, has 
been retired and pensioned. 

During his entire service Mr. Bailey has had 
a clear record, of which he is justly proud. 
He was born on May 7, 1852, and entered 
the service as agent-operator at Madison- 
ville on May 1, 1874, on the old Marietta 
and Cincinnati Railroad. He served continu- 
ously at Madisonville until he was retired 
on his sixty-fifth birthday. His record speaks 
for itself. The officials and employes of 
the Ohio Division take this opportunity of 
congratulating him on his long and honorable 
railroad career. They bid him good-bye with 
great regret, and wish him many more pros- 
perous and useful years. 



Indiana Division 

Correspondent, H. S. Adams, Chief Clerk to 
Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. Mann Chairman, Superintendent, Seymour, Ind. 

S. U. Hooper Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

J. B. Purkhiser Trainmaster, Seymour, Ind. 

H. R. Gibson Division Engineer, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Quigley Master Mechanic, Seymour, Ind. 

S. A. Rogers Road Foreman of Engines, Seymour, Ind. 

M. A. McCarthy Division Operator, Seymour, Ind. 

P. T. Horan General Foreman, Seymour, Ind. 

E. Massmann Agent, Seymour, Ind. 

J. E. Sands Agent, Louisville, Ky. 

J. E. O'Dom Special Claim Agent, Cincinnati, O. 

Rotating Members 

L. N. Simmons Fireman, Seymour, Ind. 

A. Reck Conductor, Seymour, Ind. 

LoM Dt/RHAM Passenger Engineer, Louisville, Ky. 

C. W. Kline Track Foreman, Osgood, Ind. 



Effective June 20 Ross B. Mann was ap- 
point ed superintendent of the Indiana Division, 
viee Et. B. White, transferred. 

Effective June 1 W. D. Stone was appointed 
storekeeper at Ivorydale, vice G. E. Cotton, 
resigned to accept service with another com- 
pany. 

KfTective June 15 J. J. Gallagher was ap- 
pointed agent at Eighth Street, Cincinnati, 
vice \V. L. Burkline. 



Effective June 21 G. V. Copeland was 
appointed day chief train dispatcher, vice 
H. S. Smith, promoted, and C. F. Dixon was 
appointed night chief dispatcher, vice Mr. 
Copeland. 



Cincinnati Terminal 

Correspondent, Joseph Beel, Transportation 
Department 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. L. Terrant Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

J. Weidenweber Secretary 

J. H. Meyers -. Trainmaster 

C. H. Creager Road Foreman of Engines 

L. A. Cordie Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. J. Larrick Car Foreman 

J. A. Tschuor General Foreman 

G. A. Bowers General Foreman 

T. Mahoney. ! Supervisor 

Rotating Members 
E. R. Hottel Machinist 

H. W. Kirbert Engineer 

C. R. Doolittle Yardmaster 

G. Hurdle Inbound Foreman 

R. H. Searls Claim Clerk 

A. J. Heird Yardmaster 



Illinois Division 

Correspondent, C. D. Russell, Extra 
Train Dispatcher, Flora, 111. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



C. G. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent 

L. F. Priest Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

K. S. Pritchett Trainmaster 

J. W. Odum Trainmaster 

W. F. Harris Master Mechanic 

F. Hodapp Road Foreman of Engines 

C. E. Herth Division Engineer 

H. E. Orr Master Carpenter 

C. S. Whitmore Signal Supervisor 

M. F. Wyatt Supervisor 

G. H. Singer Agent, East St. Louis 

C. S. Mitchell Agent, Flora 

Hot\tino Members 

EL W. Creager Engineer 

L. R. Peepleh Fireman 

R. R. Parish Conductor 

N. McDonald Brakeman 

J. W. Walker Machinist 

Jno. Roche Boilermaker 

A. W. Heninoeh Car Inspector 

J.J. Shannon Track Foreman 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 



Effective June 20 C. G. Stevens was ap- 
pointed superintendent of the Illinois Division, 
vice Ross B. Mann, transferred. 

A fine spirit of loyalty was manifested in the 
raising of the Stars and Stripes at Washington 
Shops on June 9. The day will be remembered 
for a long time to come, as there was a double 
flag raising. One flag was hoisted on the main 
office building, the ceremonies beginning at 
4.00 p. m., the other was hoisted on the paint 
shop, in the Car Department, at 3.00 p. m. 
At 2.00 p. m. the crowd began pouring onto the 
shop grounds and attended the car shop flag 
raising. The program follows : 

Solos by Miss Bessie Porter and Mr. L. D. 
Bartlett, accompanied by the Washington 
Band; patriotic address by Hon. J. E. Thomp- 
son, of Washington; raising of the flag by painter 
foreman J. J. McNamara. During the cere- 
mony our cabinet shop foreman, John Frieder- 
ich, played a slide trombone solo, of his own 
composition. Some artist is our John! 

When the ceremony was completed, the crowd 
moved to this Main Office Building, for the 
ceremony which was conducted by the Loco- 
motive Department forces. The building was 
decorated from top to bottom with red, white 
and blue. On the stand were seated seventy- 
five small school children, principally girls, in 
charge of Mrs. J. J. Rose and Mrs. Charles 
Fullerton, and a squad of Boy Scouts. Others 
on the stand were Mayor McCarty, who acted 
as master of ceremonies, former senator D. E. 
Dick, of Maryland, who is now fuel inspector 
of our road, and medical examiner Sellman. 
Mayor McCarty delivered an address in which 
he lauded the Baltimore and Ohio and its 



employes, saying that they were the mainstay 
of Washington. Senator Dick's speech so 
enthused the audience that every man and 
woman was ready to volunteer for the Nation's 
service when he finished. The children then 
sang a verse of the "Star Spangled Banner," 
accompanied by the High School Band, under 
the direction of Professor Dillard. The Boy 
Scouts surrounded six little girls, the Misses 
Virginia Rose, Marjorie Fullerton, Mildred 
Mischler, Rhea Vance, Dorothy Moore, Quil- 
tilda Malone, who were dressed in white, with 
blue sashes and red ribbon in their hair, and 
raised the largest flag in Washington to the top 
of the ninety-eight foot staff, while all present 
sang another verse of the "Star Spangled 
Banner." 

What makes our machinists timid when enter- 
ing the holy bonds of matrimony? We under- 
stand that Richard Smeltzer was afraid to 
tackle marriage alone, so he enticed Edward 
Nimnicht to wed, too. Both couples are tour- 
ing the west on their honeymoons, and have the 
boys' heartiest congratulations. 

Speaking of marriages, did you hear that our 
shop draftsman, Joseph Minter, took to himself 
Miss Jessie Landis as a wife? 

Effective June 20 C. G. Stevens was appointed 
superintendent of the Illinois Division, with 
headquarters at Flora, vice Ross B. Mann, 
transferred. 

Effective the same date J. W. Odum was 
appointed trainmaster of the Illinois Division, 
vice Mr. Stevens. 




BOILERMAKER APPRENTICES AT WASHINGTON SHOP 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



OX RAILROAD 



\T OUR REGULAR RAILWAY DISCOUNT 



m 



We are making the same discount to Telegraph 
Operators, and to other Railway Employes, that we 
are offering to the various RAILWAY SYSTEMS— 
25% discount — with the additional concession of 
allowing payment to be made monthly if not 
convenient to pay all cash. 

The price of the Fox Typewriter, with regular equip- 
ment, is $100.00, but our Railway Discount of 25% 
reduces this to $75.00. 
Send any amount you can spare, from $5.00 up, as a first 
payment, and pay $5.00 monthly. 5% discount for all cash. 
If $10.00, or more, is sent with order we will include free 
a very fine metal case, in addition to the rubber cover, together 
with a high-class brass padlock for locking case when typewriter is not in use. 

WHAT WE CLAIM FOR THE FOX 

The FOX Typewriter has every feature found in any 
Standard Typewriter ever advertised in the Baltimore and Ohio 
Employes Magazine and a number of exclusive features of its own 



The ordinary typewriter will not meet the requirements of the telegraph operator. 

Our New Fox Telegraphers' Model is a revelation in completeness, durability, ease of operation 
and special automatic features. It is fully Visible, has the lightest touch and easiest action 
of any typewriter in the world,, makes almost no noise and is built to give a lifetime of service 
and satisfaction. 

The Famous Fox Telegraphers' Keyboard has 44 keys, writing 88 characters, with a 
standard arrangement of the regular letters, numerals, punctuation, etc., but with a number 
of additional characters, absolutely necessary in the work of the telegrapher, and not obtain- 
able on other typewriters. 

These typewriters are strictly new stock, up-to-the-minute in every detail, complete with 
telegraphers' keyboard, any size or style of type, shift or shiftless, rubber covers, two-color 
ribbons and are guaranteed for three years from date of purchase. 

Please order direct from this offer, mentioning the Baltimore and Ohio Employes Magazine, and inclose any 
amount of cash you can spare. Shipment of typewriters will be made same day order is received. 




PletUt mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 79 




Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



so 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Toledo Division 

Correspondent, I. E. Clayton, Division 
Operator, Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

F. B. Mitchell Chairman, Superintendent 

R. W. Brown Trainmaster 

F. J. Parrish Division Engineer 

I. E. Clayton Division Operator 

Harr y Driver Machinist 

Fred Irey Road Engineer 

F. McKilltps Yard Conductor 

P. K. Partee Secretary, Secretary to Superintendent 

Many vacancies in the Dayton offices, caused 
by young men leaving to join the colors, have 
been filled by the employment of young women. 
Among these newcomers are Miss Thelma 
Foley, office girl in the superintendent's office, 
the Misses Alma Olive and Anna Reeves, 
stenographers in the division engineer's office, 
and Miss Mary Flanford, invoice clerk and Miss 
Jessie Munch, assistant timekeeper, in the 
division engineer's office, and the Misses Maud 
Veidt, Vivian Berfoot and Marian Hurley, in 
the agent's office. 

E. J. Soehner, accountant in the division engi- 
neer's office and C. A. King, bridge inspector, 
have left the single ranks and recently taken 
unto themselves helpmates. 

A. N. Davidson, assistant, division engineer 
at Dayton, has been transferred to assistant 
district engineer of the Southwestern. He is 
succeeded by W. P. Ball. 

The boys of the Toledo Division are showing 
their patriotism by responding to the call of 
their country. A. R. Burkhardt, of the divi- 
sion engineer's office, enlisted in the Quarter- 
master's Department of the regulars; Paul 
Partee, W. R. Sauberan and C. R. Townsend, 
of the superintendent's office, Lester Under- 
wood, Harry Snyder and James Foley of the 
agent's office, and Howard White of the master 
mechanic's office have joined Battery D. 

William O'Leary, assistant cashier at Day- 
ton for the last four years, died at his home on 
May 12, after an illness of about nine weeks. 
Our deepest sympathy is extended to his 
bereaved parents and brothers and sister. 

The Greater Dayton Association, through 
Mr. John H. Patterson, offered prizes for the 
best kept pieces of track through the city of 
Dayton. Section foreman Charles Hunt got 
busy (he is always on the alert) and won first 
prize, S'io.OO. Mr. Hunt lias been in the service 
for five years, and is one of the most efficient 
section foremen in the service. 

Train dispatcher and Mrs. (i. ('. Smith have 
left on their vacation. They will visit Chatta- 
nooga and St . Louis. 

I. B. ClaytOll, train dispatcher, has been 
appointed division operator, succeeding H. W. 
Brant] who was appointed t rainuiast er of the 

Wellston Division. Good luck "Ike!" 




THE TRIPLE ALLIANCE— STOREKEEPERS 
DAWSCN, SCHWAB AND COTTON 



Wellston Division 

Correspondent, H. T. Heileman, Timekeeper 
Dayton, Ohio 

Divisional Safety Committee 

E. J. Carrell Chairman. Superintendent 

H. G. Snyder Division Engineer 

Geo. Carr Division Foreman 

J. N. Ginan Conductor 

J. T. McGee Engineer 

M. Roach Car Inspector 

W. A. Bean Machinist 

H. F. Schwab Division Storekeeper 



The accompanying picture shows that har- 
mony exists between the storekeepers on the 
Toledo and Delphos Divisions. Reading from 
left to right, the gentlemen in the picture are: 
V. N. Daw-son, of Lima; H. F. Schwab, of 
Dayton, and G. E. Cotton, of Ivorydale. 

After twenty-seven years of continuous 
service with this Company, engineer C. H. 
Littler died on April 18, after a short illness. 
Mr. Littler entered the service as a fireman, 
in 1890, and in August, 1893, was promoted to 
engineer, serving in that capacity at Wellston 
until the illness which resulted in his death. 
His long career with this Company has been a 
loyal and faithful one, and his valuable services 
will be greatly missed. The Company, and all 
the boys on this division, express their deep 
sympathy to his family in their great loss. 

Operator J. Redfern is now filling the position 
at Jamestown, Ohio, made vacant by the death 
of operator H. J. Warneke. 



Sandy Valley & Elkhorn Railway 

Correspondent, George Dixon, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

II R. Lauohun , Chairman 

A. W. White Supervisor M. & W. Department 

D. W. Blankenhhip Section Foreman 

S. H.Johnson Engineer 

E 10. Cassidy Fireman 

J. M. Moohe Conductor 



Baltimore < &Oh\o 

Employes Magazine 




The Answer in the Back 
of the Book 

fl When you went to school and studied a difficult problem you often wished that 
you could turn to the back of the book and find the answer. You have been fight- 
ing your way in life, solving most of your problems as they came up. You are now 
a good citizen of your town, yet you have never had a permanent home in the town. 
The problem of a home is still unsolved — how to locate one and how to own it. 

<I You can find the answer to your problem in the Regulations of the Relief 
Department. 

In the back of the book in the section devoted to the Savings Feature you will 
find the regulations covering the purchase of a home. 

<I There are always some details to be explained and that is what we want 
to do for you. 

<I Write to " Division S " of the Baltimore and Ohio Relief Depart- 
ment, Baltimore, Md., and let us tell you just how the Regu- 
lations work for you with the Savings Feature plan that assists 
employes to purchase their own homes. 

<I The Relief Department has properties at various points on the System and will 
be glad to sell them to employes on the monthly payment plan. 



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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



- Short 
451 Stories 

M Stones 



2 vo^ r b e °- d tt aU 
^ ea utUu\ K G e ol dtops. 
Moto cc0 >. 27* com- 



plete stones, 
novel- 



stories 
long 

^ P° C - sUk do*; 
novel , IC 



6 volumes. 
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Finish This Story For 
Yourself — 

The girl got $6 a week and was lonely. " Piggy "— you 
can imagine his kind — was waiting downstairs. He knew 

where champagne and music could be had. But that night she didn't 
go. That was Lord Kitchener's doing. But another night ? 

12 

Volumes 



0. HENRY 



tells about it in this story, with that full knowledge 
of women, with that frank facing of sex, and that clean 

mind that has endeared him to the men and women of the land. 
From the few who snapped up the first edition at $125 a set before it 
was off the press, to the 120,000 who have eagerly sought the beautiful 
volumes offered you here — from the professional man who sits among 
his books to the man on the street and to the woman in every walk of 
life — the whole nation bows to O. Henry — and hails him with love 
and pride as our greatest writer of stories. 

This is but one of the 274 stories, in 12 big volumes* 
you get for 37 r 2 cents a week, if you send the coupon 



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From East to West; from North 
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who stoically wonders where the next mouth- 
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and the wayward sister, all feel in common 
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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




The Only Girl Who 
Commanded a 
Nation's Armies 



A simple little girl of sixteen played 
one day in a little lost village. The 
next year, in supreme command of all 
the troops of France, she led them in 
triumph to victory. 

Great dukes bowed before this girl, 
who could not read. Sinful men, men 
who had cursed and drunk and mur- 
dered all their days, followed her 
meekly. 

It is the most dramatic, the most 
amazing story in the whole story of 
human life. In the dim, far-off past, 
Joan of Arc went her shining way in 
France — and her story was never told 
as it should have been till it was told 
by an American — 



MARK TWAIN 



To us whose chuckles had turned to tears over 
the pathos of "Huckleberry Finn" — to us who 
felt the cutting edge of "Innocents Abroad" — 
the coming of "Joan of Arc" from the pen of 
Mark Twain was no surprise. 
The story began as an anonymous romance in 
Harper's Magazine, but within a few months the 
secret was out. Who but Mark Twain could 
have written it? Who could have written this 



book that has almost the simplicity, tfce loftiness 
of the Bible — but with a whimsical touch which 
makes it human? Mark Twain's Joar of Arc is 
no cold statue in a church — no bronze on a 
pedestal, but a warm, human, loving girl. 
Read "Joan of Arc" if you would read the most 
sublime thing that has come from the pen of any 
American. Read "Joan of Arc" if you would 
know Mark Twain in all his greatness. It is ac- 
curate history told in warm story form. 



The Price Goes Up 



Great American 

Born poor — growing up in 
shabby little town on the Mis- 
sissippi — a pilot — a seeker for 
gold — a printer — Mark Twain 
was molded on the frontier of 
America. 

The vastncss of the West — the 
fearlessness of the pioneer — the 
clear philosophy of the country 
boy were his — and they stayed 
with him in all simplicity to the 
last day of those glorious later 
days — when German Emperor 
and English King — Chinese 

BfanUarin ami plain American, 
all alike, wept fur him, 



25 VOLUMES 
Novels — Stories — Humor — Essays — Travels- 
History 

This is Mark Twain's own set. This is the set 
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imes meant. Because he asked it, Har- «* 
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- • r - a and Ohio 

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Send Coupon Without Money 

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New York: 

all 



of the editi-: 

sight. The price of paper 

liis gone up. There never «J> All 8 e " d "„„ , , 

• mi u charges prepaid, sot 

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-Mark I wain at the pros- # in 25 volumes. Illustrated, 
ent price. Get the 25 hound in handsome green 

ilum.es now while S cloth, stamped in gold, gold 
" deckled edges. If 



u can. 

nit children want 



Harper S Brothers, New YorK 



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Not His Job Edgar A. Guest 4 

Cumberland and Garrett Teams to Battle for System Baseba 

Championship in Baltimore on Labor Day 5 

Report of the Sessions of Various Departments at Deer Park 

Meeting, June 29 and 30 7 

A Editor's Farewell to His Readers 25 

The Freight Yards — Poem Phoebe Hoffman 26 

Freight Loss and Damage Claims — Their Causes and Possible 

Cure C. C. Glessner 

"Number 258 Step Up Front," Says Uncle Sam 

The Esequiel Jewels Arthur Walter Grahame 

Accident Prevention — Prize Article John A. Rupp 

The Evolution of the Relief Department William H. Ball 

Twenty-Eighth Annual Meeting of Baltimore and Ohio Asso- 
ciation of Railway Surgeons Held in Cleveland 44 

The Troubles of Mr. Way-Bill and the Freight Family — 

No. 8— Delivery H. Irving Martin 46 

The Menace of the Mosquito and How It Can Be Eliminated 

E. M. Parlett, M. D. 47 

Editorial 52 

Handling Once 53 

Statement of Pension Feature 54 

Bando Club Girls Prove Their Patriotism by Taking Up Red 

Cross Work Edith Henderson 55 

Can You Can ? Reinette Lovewell, of the Vigilantes 57 

Women's Department 58 

Special Merit 61 

Among Ourselves 65 



Published monthly at Baltimore, Maryland, by the employes or the 
Baltimore and Ohio Railroad to promote community of interest and 
greater efficiency. Contributions are welcomed from all employes. 
Manuscripts and photographs will be returned upon request. Please 
write on one side of the sheet only. 





Not His Job 

By Edgar A. Guest 

in Detroit Free Press 



"I'm not supposed to do that," said he, 
When an extra task he chanced to see; 
"That's not my job, and it's not my care, 
So I'll pass it by and leave it there." 
And the boss who gave him his weekly pay 
Lost more than his wages on him that day. 

"I'm not supposed to do that," he said; 
"That duty belongs to Jim or Fred." 
So a little task that was in his way 
That he could have handled without delay 
Was left unfinished; the way was paved 
For a heavy loss that he could have saved. 

And time went on and he kept his place 
But he never altered his easy pace, 
And folks remarked on how well he knew 
The line of the tasks he was hired to do; 
For never once was he known to turn 
His hand to things not of his concern. 

But there in his foolish rut he stayed 

And for all he did he was fairly paid, 

But he never was worth a dollar more 

Than he got for his toil when the week was o'er; 

For he knew too well when his work was through 

And he'd done all he was hired to do. 

If you want to grow in this world, young man, 
You must do every day all the work you can; 
If you find a task, though it's not your bit, 
And it should be done, take care of it ! 
And you'll never conquer or rise if you 
Do only the things you're supposed to do. 



Cumberland and Garrett Teams to Battle 
For System Baseball Championship 
in Baltimore on Labor Day 



UMBERLAND and Garrett will 
cross bats for the championship 
of the Baltimore and Ohio System 
Baseball League, at Homewood 
Field, Baltimore, on the afternoon of 
Labor Day, September 3. The teams, 
winners of the lines east and the lines 
west championships, will contest for 
the Thompson Challenge Cup, won last 
year by Philadelphia, and the Davis Cup, 
which becomes the property of the 1917 
champions. The former was presented 
by A. W. Thompson, vice-president of 
the Traffic and Commercial Development 
Department, and the latter is a gift from 
J. M. Davis, operating vice-president. 
The Welfare Bureau will present watch 
fobs to the members of the winning team. 

The championship game this year, the 
second since the System-wide athletic 
program was inaugurated, promises to 
draw a crowd that will tax the capacity 
of the Johns Hopkins University field. 
Elaborate plans have been made to 
handle the crowd, and special attention 
has been given the details assuring safety 
and comfort for the players and fans. 
Meantime the Maryland boys and the 
Indiana lads are working hard to put 
on the finishing touches for the big event. 

The success of the baseball season 
which closes on Labor Day is due to the 
excellent work of the General Athletic 
Committee, composed of Dr. E. M. 
Parlett, chief of the Welfare Bureau, and 
six chief clerks representing general 



superintendent districts and other so- 
called units on the System, and the whole- 
hearted cooperation of officials and em- 
ployes. 

The athletic committee has met in 
executive session monthly, and before 
the season opened a book of rules was 
printed and freely distributed among 
superintendents and other officials and 
baseball players for their uniform guid- 
ance. The first page of this little book 
tersely sets forth the why and wherefore 
of a System baseball league. 

"The purpose of the management in 
organizing a System-wide baseball 
league," it says, "is to promote health, 
welfare, the pleasant rivalry of clean 
sport, fellowship and recreation; to get 
as many employes as possible interested 
and playing and not to encourage or 
promote professionalism or specifically a 
specialty of high grade baseball pro- 
ficiency. 

"The trophies are awarded to stimulate 
interest and enjoyment in friendly con- 
test, not the bitter antagonism of rivalry. 

"Therefore, protests should be avoided 
as far as possible. Fair play, tolerance, 
temperance and kindly deportment on 
all occasions is insisted upon." 

This has been carried out to the letter 
during the season. Those who witness 
the championship game at Baltimore will 
see the winners of a series of elimination 
contests noted for all-around clean sports- 
manship. 




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THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



On April 1 the 1917 season opened 
with fifty-one baseball teams, located as 
follows by divisional units: 

Ohio 1 Ohio River 1 

Illinois 3 New Castle 1 

Indiana 3 Connellsville 1 

Mount Clare. . . 2 Pittsburgh 3 

Toledo 4 Cleveland 4 

Chicago 3 Maryland District .. . 11 

Newark 3 Staten Island 4 

Wheeling 1 Parkersburg 1 

Holloway Grafton 1 

Bridgeport .... Baltimore and Ohio B'ld'g. 4 

The time between April 1 and June 15 
was devoted to testing out baseball 
candidates and playing games between 
teams on each of the divisions separately 
to decide division championships. The 
next month was utilized for games 
between divisions in each district sepa- 
rately to decide district championships. 
The winners were awarded silver cups, 
the gift of the general superintendents. 

New York, Baltimore and Ohio Build- 
ing, Mount Clare and Cumberland 
(Maryland district) were the successful 
teams on lines east. Chicago Junction 



(Northwest district), Washington — Indi- 
ana Shops (Southwestern district) , Wheel- 
ing (West Virginia district) and ( ilcnwood 
Shops (Pennsylvania district) lead the 
lines west. 

During the period between July 15 and 
August 18 inter-district games between 
district champion teams on lines east 
and west separately were played. Cum- 
berland captured the eastern contests 
an August 11, when by a score of 10 to 
New York's colors were lowered. The 
game was played at Cumberland. On 
the same day the lines west champion- 
ship was won by Garrett at Washington, 
Ind., when the home team went down to 
defeat by a score of 3 to 1. 

As stated above the Davis Cup will be 
presented outright to the 1917 System 
championship team. The Thompson 
Cup, however, remains a challenge trophy 
until it is captured three successive 
seasons by the same team. These cups 
have been sent all over the System for 
display at points where the greatest 
number of employes may view them. 




STANDARD TRACK AT WEST END OF BOARD TREE TUNNEL, ON THE 
WHEELING DIVISION 



Reports of the Sessions of the Various 
Departments at the Deer Park 
Meeting/ June 29 and 30 



I"ylN the July issue of the Magazine 
1 there was published a brief ac- 
count of the meeting of the 
officers of the Baltimore and 
Ohio System at Deer Park Hotel on 
June 29 and 30, and President Willard's 
patriotic and inspiring speech was printed 
in full. The following are accounts of 
the sessions of the various departments 
of our service. Limited space has made 
it impossible to print the addresses in 
full, but an earnest effort has been made 
to give the gist and salient points of 
each of them. It is regretted that space 
does not allow us to print in full Mr. 
Norton's talk on the great work of the 
American Red Cross but as he and other 
able writers and speakers are continually 
keeping the public informed as to the 
needs and progress of the Red Cross it 
was not deemed wise to print his address 
to the exclusion of purely railroad topics. 

The Session of the Traffic and Commercial 
Development Department 

The morning of the first day of this 
year's Deer Park meeting was devoted 
to listening to Mr. Willard's masterly 
talk on the duty of the Baltimore and 
Ohio man — and of the officers and em- 
ployes of all other railroads — in the 
present international crisis. After 
luncheon the officers again assembled in 
the convention hall and the session of 
the Traffic and Commercial Development 
Departments was called to order at two 
o'clock, vice-president A. W. Thompson 
presiding. 



Mr. Thompson's Address 

Mr. Thompson opened the session by 
inquiring why, after listening to Mr. 
Willard's address, there was any use in 
further conversation. 

"The only possible thing that I can 
see to do," he said, "is to supplement 
some of the things Mr. Willard said by 
asking our traffic officers to go a little 
more into detail as to some of the things 
they are doing and to tell us what is the 
future of the Commercial Department 
of the Baltimore and Ohio. Of what 
use is the Traffic and Commercial 
Development Department at this par- 
ticular time? Why should we try to get 
a lot of additional industries on the Sys- 
tem when it is generally understood that 
we now have more business than we can 
take care of; and that, if we could take 
care of twenty-five or thirty per cent, 
more business than we now handle it 
would be offered to us because of our 
connections and other railroads being 
unable to handle the business that is 
being offered them? Let us discuss this 
situation and see if there is anything 
that the Traffic Department or the 
Commercial Development Department 
can do, and, of course, we must discuss 
it along the lines outlined by our presi- 
dent this morning. What can we do to 
help win the war?" 

Mr. Thompson then outlined the 
rearrangement of the Traffic Depart- 
ment and the creation of the Commercial 
Development Department about a year 
ago, remarking that while nearly all of 



7 



8 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




the officers of the Company were familiar 
with the work of these departments 
during the last year he thought that a 
further discussion of their work would be 
interesting to those who had not had the 
opportunity of becoming acquainted with 
just what was in the minds of the head of 
the department and his staff. 

"In working out the reorganization," 
he continued, "it seemed that in some 
ways the railroads were not proceeding 
along the same lines as do industrial 
companies, that is, that in handling 
business presented them in lean years they 
had fallen somewhat in a rut. Some- 
times officers in charge of traffic said — 
' well, there isn't any business now, so we 
can't get it,' or, ' there isn't enough 
business' to go around and we are getting 
all we can.' So far as I know there was 
then no measure to discover whether or 
not that was true, and a little later in the 
afternoon I want to ask some of our 
traffic officers what is their measure, in 
other words, what is their yardstick. 
In other departments they have yard- 
sticks — they have units of operation. It 
seems to me that there should be units 
in all departments, that there should be 
a measure, that there should be standards 
that we can live up to. 

There has been a great change in the last 
few years in the handling of railroad busi- 
ness, and in reorganizing this department, 
and in creating the Commercial Develop- 
ment Department, Mr. Willard made the 
first step of its kind in this country. In 
the last year three other large systems have 
fallen in line and created departments 
somewhat similar to ours, indicating that 
this step has the approval of those rail- 
roads at least. The public, too, has seen 
the work that has been done and by 
using our lines has given its approval — 
I believe even to a greater .extent than 
was anticipated by our president. 

"This morning Mr. Willard spoke of 
the trainload. What can the Traffic and 
Commercial Development Departments 
do in the matter of the trainload? At 
first thought you may think that we can 
do nothing. But a great deal can be 
done. Tlx 1 officers of this department 
are already at work <>n the problem it is 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



9 



usually considered an operating problem, 
and the largest part of it is an operating 
problem- but in getting business, in 
dealing with the public, we are handling 
thirty-five per cent, of our car miles — 
empty car miles — in order to get the cars 
to some place where there are loads for 
them. That is too large a percentage. 
Every car that can be loaded in the 
direction that it now travels light means 
that much more added to our trainload. 
The Operating Department, in returning 
the car to a place where it can be loaded, 
can haul it with a load at a very small 
increase in cost, so that in building up the 
business of our Company a great deal 
can be done by our traffic officers in 
arranging for business in the direction in 
which our cars now usually travel light. 
A little later we will have one of the 
officers of the Freight Traffic Department 
talk on that subject." 

As an illustration of the work of the 
Commercial Development Department 
Mr. Thompson spoke of the situation in 
the glass industry, which uses many 
carloads of glass sand in the manufacture 
of glass. Most of the glass plants are in 
the great industrial territories — Pitts- 
burgh, Clarksburg, Fairmont, and in 
West Virginia and Ohio. Some years 
ago Defiance and Fostoria, on the 
Chicago Division, were large glass manu- 
facturing centers, but because of the 
exhaustion of the natural gas with which 
these communities had been favored the 
plants were moved away, to the great 
detriment of the general business of the 
territory. If proper attention had been 
given the matter of making it possible 
for these plants to continue the manu- 
facture of glass without natural gas they 
would have remained. A similar situa- 
tion now confronts the glass manufac- 
turing districts of West Virginia. 
Natural gas is giving out. But our Com- 
mercial Department, through our com- 
mercial and industrial men, is working 
out methods to show the manufacturers 
how to use producer gas, and there is so 
little difference between the costs of the 
natural and artificial gas that many of 
the plants have started to use producer 
gas, having a gas plant at each of their 
plants. 



"How does that help win the war?" 
asked Mr. Thompson. "What has glass 
to do with the winning of the war? What 
has industry to do with the winning of 
the war? It is the plan for this year, in 
following out the policy outlined by our 
chief executive, to arrange for industrial 
plants coming to the Baltimore and Ohio 
such locations that their cost of produc- 
tion will be the lowest, that their markets 
will be the broadest, that the housing- 
conditions and surroundings will be the 
best for their particular purpose — all of 
which means a good net result for that 
particular industry. If we are able to 
get industries of that kind located along 
our lines — munition plants and powder 
plants such as are now being located — 
the result will be a general better handling 
of the business of the country and instead 
of having a number of inefficient plants 
on our System we will have a number of 
effective plants. They will be able to 
get out their product promptly, effi- 
ciently and at low cost, they will be 
producing the materials necessary for the 
winning of the war in a manner that will 
create a greater production, one of the 
things most necessary just now. 

"Up to yesterday seven hundred and 
thirty-one industries have been located 
on the Baltimore and Ohio since we met 
here last year. That means two new 
industries a day, Sundays and holidays 
included, each of them requiring a side- 
track connection; on an average every 
morning and every afternoon a side-track 
was put in for a new industry on the 
Baltimore and Ohio. 

"It is true that at present there are 
more carloads of freight to be transported 
than can be handled by the railroads. 
Some industries are expanding their 
plants, some are abandoning their old 
plants and with the profits they have 
made building new plants for the purpose 
of . operating more efficiently, and are 
now taking advantage of new long-time 
contracts and future business to build up 
a plant which, in the lean years, will 
produce results that will keep them going. 
So, after all, in bringing new industries 
to our lines we are creating a prosperous 
future for our railroad, which is what we 
want to look forward to. 



10 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




" Conditions after the war is a subject 
of discussion by a groat many business 
men and economists in (his country. It 
will be a war for trade and in building up 
a machine, building up business now thai 
will win the present war we must not lose 
sight of the problems that will confront 
us at its close. 

" Again, in connection with train 
loading, it seems to me to be most im- 
portant that we pay closer attention to 
the loading of cars both ways, insisting 
upon getting a capacity load for all our 
cars. Unfortunately, in the past, be- 
cause of competition, railroads have not 
paid as much attention to that subject 
as they should have. At this particular 
time we are able to get business in a 
manner never before acquired. Take 
fertilizer as an example. It is usually 
loaded in cars in bags, two bags to a tier, 
but this year the fertilizer manufacturers 
needed the cars and they very willingly 
permitted the tariffs to be changed, 
calling for the loading of a higher maxi- 
mum, or three tiers in a box car. That 
resulted in a very material saving in box 
cars on our road — I think it has been 
calculated that some 2,900 cars were 
saved on the eastern part of the road 
alone, and this year more fertilizer was 
handled by our road from points where it 
is manufactured— principally in the East 
along Chesapeake Bay — to western 
points than was ever handled in any 
previous year. In doing that our rail- 
road was of great service in supple- 
menting the work of the Department 
of Agriculture in getting more intensive 
cultivation of the soil. 

"Cement manufacturers have been 
accustomed to loading 60,000 pounds in 
cars of 100,000 pounds capacity, but 
when they were brought together and 
the situation explained to them they 
very readily agreed to load their product, 
if we could get the shippers generally to 
agree, to the full capacity of the cms. 
Naturally, they were more than willing 
to sell 100, 000 pounds of cemenl instead 
of 60,000 pounds. Today we are in- 
creasing the carload in thai direction, 
which means a greater trainload and 
which means thai when we haul a car 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



1 1 



we have less dead weight per ton hauled 
with 100,000 pounds in a car than with 
60,000. That is what the Operating 
Department is after — to get the greatest 
amount of net. And let me say right 
here that the Commercial Department, if 
it is going to be a business department— 
and that is what it has been asked to be, 
and what it is reasonable to ask it to be — 
must see to these things. It is not 
simply a question of getting gross earn- 
ings simply to show high gross. This 
railroad, like any industrial concern, is a 
business concern. What we are after is 
the greatest possible net, and unless we 
pay attention to the loading of our cars, 
to getting the greatest load, to getting 
the greatest trainload, to getting the 
minimum number of empty car miles to 
the total mileage, we are not doing our 
work in a business-like way, and there 
is great room for improvement in that 
direction. In fact, as Mr. Willard said 
of the Maintenance Department this 
morning, that will be a subject that we 
shall discuss continually and as long, I 
imagine, as any Commercial Department 
exists. 

"Another duty of the Commercial 
Department is to help form public 
opinion. A great many statements about 
the railroads have been made in the 
papers in the last few years. Many of 
them were made with the full purpose of 
telling the truth, but too often they did 
not have correct information — they were 
incorrectly informed. In that connection 
our commercial men, in going about, in 
meeting Boards of Trade, Chambers of 
Commerce, and State Associations, car- 
rying well in their minds what has been 
said this morning by our president, can 
bring before the public a source of 
truthful statements about the railroad 
that in the end must have a great effect 
upon the final result. Just think what 
a different opinion of the railroads the 
public has today from that which it had 
a few years, even a few months, ago. A 
year ago the situation was very acute, in 
fact, six months ago, before the war 
board was formed, it was very acute. 
It then seemed that conditions were so 
unsatisfactory, that there were so many 
misunderstandings, that the Govern- 



ment would have to take a hand in the 
operation of the railroads of our country. 
Then came this better understanding, 
which has been brought about by the 
things which have been done by a 
number of railroad officers who are 
sitting continually in Washington and, 
more particularly, by the thorough under- 
standing of railroad affairs which we are 
so fortunate in finding in our president. 
He has communicated this understand- 
ing to the minds of government officials, 
which has created a situation that will go 
down in history and will be more and 
more appreciated as the years go by." 

After the applause which greeted this 
statement had subsided, Mr. Thompson 
continued : 

"The Commercial Department can do 
a great amount of work in rearranging 
pro rates, and in following up cars and 
seeing that they are properly routed. 

"An instance recently called to my 
attention impressed me greatly. At a 
station just west of here a Santa Fe car 
was to be loaded at a point in Kansas, 
and the agent, when asked about the 
routing of the car, said 'Santa Fe car? 
Why Chicago, of course.' The car was 
routed through Chicago, and in going to 
Chicago from this portion of our System 
had to go through a most congested 
district — Wheeling or Pittsburgh — a terri- 
tory which we want to keep business out 
of if possible. The correct routing of 
that Santa Fe car to its destination in 
Kansas should have been through the 
St. Louis gateway. Had the car been 
correctly routed our proportion would 
have been ten dollars and eighty-four 
cents more than it was. By that error 
our earnings were reduced and I suppose 
that there are cases of that kind occurring 
constantly. Through this Interchange 
of Commodity Bureau, which I shall 
refer to later, much is being done to 
supplement our gross earnings, and 
incidentally our net earnings, as it would 
have been in that case — the net would 
have been greater because of the car 
passing through a territory not so con- 
gested as Pittsburgh or Wheeling. 

"Now, just a word about cooperation 
between the departments. I have heard 
it said — probably the cases are rare, but 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




the fact that they occur at all is sufficient 
cause for us to discuss the question — 
that when a shipment went astray, when 
things were not properly handled, when 
shippers complained, some of the com- 
mercial men said, 'Oh, that's up to the 
Operating Department. If the Operating 
Department had not fallen down the 
shipment would have gone through.' 
They did not realize that by that state- 
ment they did more to injure their rail- 
road than by almost anything else they 
could have said. Our policy is, for the 
benefit of those who do not happen to 
know, that statements of that kind and 
such lack of cooperation are prohibited. 
We want, and we are going to insist upon, 
if it is necessary — although I do not 
think that it is — that the commercial men 
handle the business, the commercial side 
of the railroad, in a right and good way. 
It is not necessary — it is not ethical, to 
begin with — to pass it on to some other 
department. It's all Baltimore and Ohio. 
Every one of us is interested in the future 
of the Baltimore and Ohio, besides being 
interested in what we accomplish each 
day, and unless we take a portion of the 
responsibility, unless we know about the 
general business conditions on other 
railroads, as we do on our own, and keep 
well posted and talk to the shippers, we 
will not achieve the best results. We 
want the traffic men — the commercial 
men — if a shipper happens to see some- 
thing about the movement of cars, or 
says that a certain division or territory 
is badly handled, to be able to come right 
back and say — knowing something about 
the situation, to begin with — 'Why, you 
don't understand what that man has to 
contend with, you don't realize the 
volume of business that has to be passed 
through that particular territory. There 
isn't a man living who can do what you 
expect to be done!' Explain to the 
shipper what the railroads' problems 
are, explain to him what the railroads 
have had to do in the handling of business, 
and in meeting the increased expense and 
increased wages without an increase in 
rates. When you go home you can do 
all the talking you want to among your- 
selves tell the man responsible jusl whal 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



13 



you think of him, but tell it to him in pri- 
vate, do not discuss it before the public. 

"We have just passed through a long 
discussion of the rate question — not as 
long as the ones in 1910 and 1913, not as 
difficult a one by any means. The case 
in 1913 was so well prepared that the 
results, and the understanding, that the 
Interstate Commerce Commission gained 
at that time made this case very much 
easier, and we hope that in time we will 
see the railroads, in the eastern territory 
at least, getting a fifteen per cent, advance 
in their rates. This will come about 
unless the Commission in the meantime 
decides to suspend the rates; and so far 
there is nothing that indicates that they 
are going to do anything of that kind. 

"That meant much work by many 
railroad officers, from presidents down. 
Various men from various departments 
were brought in to testify and to explain 
the situation of the railroads, and I think 
that today the Interstate Commerce 
Commission, as well as the general 
public, knows more about the railroad 
situation than ever before. 

"Our Commercial Department officers 
were able, through representation of our 
case to various Boards of Trade and 
Chambers of Commerce, to get forty- 
seven resolutions from such bodies in 
favor of the rate advance. 

"These resolutions, supplementing what 
has been said in Washington on the 
rate question, helped a great deal, and I 
want to take this opportunity to say 
publically to these officers that their 
accomplishment is worthy of great recom- 
mendation. It takes time, it takes 
study and preparation to be able to go 
before these various bodies of busy men, 
to be able to meet their arguments and 
to be able to come away with good 
feeling and resolutions such as I have 
already mentioned." 

Mr. Thompson then spoke of embar- 
goes, saying that they were a valuable aid 
to the Traffic Department in preventing 
congestion and in avoiding the tying up 
of equipment. 

Mr. Wight Discusses Embargoes 

He then called upon C. S. Wight, general 
freight representative, to speak on the 



subject. Mr. Wight said that war con- 
ditions have made a great difference in the 
manner in which railroads must be oper- 
ated — instead of each road doing all the 
business it could, we are now working our 
railroads on the system of embargoes 
and permits. "At first/' he said, "it was 
a needed relief to the Operating Depart- 
ment, but was considered quite un- 
fortunate by the Freight Department 
and an annoyance by the shippers, but 
now the new conditions have made it 
plain to all that it was necessary to 
secure movement in reasonable time, 
and to continue to operate on the old 
system would have meant the tying up 
of the entire railroad traffic of the coun- 
try. 

"We finally proposed this — " he said, 
"let the Operating Department use eveiy 
effort to relieve congestion before they ask 
for an embargo. Let all departments, 
especially the Freight Department, earn- 
estly strive, when an embargo is order- 
ed, to convince the public of its neces- 
sity and of the fact that it is, in the long 
run, an advantage to them. Today the 
shippers* do not object to embargoes — 
they have been convinced that the situa- 
tion requires them. To a certain extent 
we have educated the public on this 
point. But we should keep at it and 
convince the smaller shippers, as well, 
that what we are doing is for their 
benefit. ,, 

Mr. Wight also spoke in regard to our 
method of permits on goods for exports 
via Baltimore and on the measures that 
must be taken when the Government 
assumes control of all exports. 

Mr. Thompson then spoke on the in- 
crease of our freight earnings — twenty- 
two and one-half per cent, increase since 
1910 — and of our improved equipment, 
over ninety-two per cent, of which today 
is steel underframe and steel cars, an 
improvement making possible a better 
handling of our business, a less number of 
our cars sent out for repairs, which means 
better dispatch for the commodities 
shipped over our road, and gives our 
commercial men a fine talking point in 
approaching the public. Ours is the 
highest percentage of steel underframe 
and steel cars in the United States." 



14 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




Activities of Trunk Line Association 

The next speaker was Archibald Fries, 
freight traffic manager. After outlining 
the history and work of the Trunk Line 
Association, which is composed of all the 
trunk lines leading from the Atlantic 
Seaboard to the west and which occupies 
a most important position in the railroad 
world, he told of some of its latest 
accomplishments. He said, in part: 

"The Trunk Line Association initiated 
and bore the greater part of the burden 
of the fifteen per cent, rate advance, 
which we all hope is to be brought to a 
successful conclusion. In addition to 
that they have, in the last six months, 
been carefully analyzing the different 
rates, rules and regulations governing 
traffic in this territory, with a view to 
increasing the revenue whenever possible. 
At a recent meeting the association de- 
cided to eliminate the rule allowing free 
lighterage in New York Harbor. They 
have agreed to increase the minimum 
weight of merchandise cars from 10,000 
to 12,500 pounds." 

As soon as the rate increase is decided, 
the speaker continued, the Association 
would have to give its attention to the 
general readjustment of local rates in its 
territory. He also spoke, in connection 
with the rates on traffic going through 
the Potomac gateway, of the bureau for 
determining the cost of transportation 
organized by Mr. Thompson while vice- 
president in charge of operation, and 
continued by him in his present position, 
paying a high tribute to its efficiency. 

After speaking briefly of conditions in 
the territory of the Central Freight Asso- 
ciation the chairman called upon C. L. 
Thomas, freight traffic manager, who 
spoke on conditions in that territory. 
Mr. Thomas was followed by O. A. 
Constans, freight traffic manager, who 
spoke of conditions in Chicago, and by 
(). P. Mc( 'arty, who spoke on the subject 
of " Ideal Schedules." 

Passenger Schedules 

"There are several factors," Mr. Mr- 
Carty said, "that enter into the making 
of a schedule. First, <>ur terminal time 
is determined by Hie conditions largely 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



by competition. The leaving time must 
be so fixed as to make connections and 
in a large commercial sense, best to ac- 
commodate the business traveler from 
that section. At the other end the time 
is fixed for us by the same method. 
These factors being determined, we aim 
to make as many as possible of the inter- 
mediate connections. We have a rather 
difficult problem to meet in making 
through schedules. We have four com- 
mercial centers, very important passen- 
ger cities, in the east — New York, Phila- 
delphia, Baltimore and Washington 
(Washington is one of the greatest pas- 
senger cities on our System). We must 
adjust our schedules so as to take care 
of our Pittsburgh business both ways, 
and so as to make connections at Chi- 
cago. The perfect schedule, to my mind, 
is one that will meet these conditions 
and at the same time give the passenger 
a favorable and safe journey." 

Continuing, Mr. McCarty said that 
our schedules had been very much im- 
proved in the last few years, and that 
at least four of our through trains be- 
tween New York and Chicago have ideal 
schedules — schedules that are bringing 
us business. He also spoke of local and 
commuter schedules, remarking that in 
the commuter district the trains are clas- 
sified, in railroad vernacular, as for the 
"Works," the "Clerks" and the "Skirts" 
— the early morning trains for the work- 
ers, the train arriving at about eight 
o'clock for the clerks, and the later trains 
for the professional train who are, in the 
parlance of the road, called the "Skirts." 

In commenting upon Mr. McCarty's 
address Mr. Thompson said that the 
"Works," the "Clerks," and, despite the 
reduction in passenger schedules caused 
by war conditions, most of the "Skirts" 
were well taken care of and that the 
trains taken off were between ten a. m. 
and three p. m., for the "Skirts." He 
then introduced W. B. Calloway, gen- 
eral passenger agent, who spoke on 
methods of securing passenger traffic. 

Mr. Calloway was followed by B. N. 
Austin, general passenger agent, who 
spoke of conditions in the Chicago Dis- 
trict and by G. W. Squiggins, general 
passenger agent, who read a paper which 



will be printed in a later issue of the 
Magazine. In introducing E. V. Baugh, 
superintendent of Dining Cars, Mr. 
Thompson said that the way to reach 
the heart of the small boy was through 
his stomach, and that the public is sus- 
ceptible to the same method of proceed- 
ing. 

Our Dining Car Service 

"In the last eleven months," Mr. 
Baugh said, "we have served 528,459 
meals on our regular passenger trains, an 
increase of 88,921 over last year. 

"The total receipts of the department 
were $524,187.91, an increase of $111,- 
812.64 — the largest eleven months the 
Baltimore and Ohio has ever had. The 
total expenses were $572,425.19 — an 
increase in expenses of $144,916.09. The 
loss was $42,237.28 — an increase of 
$23,123." 

Mr. Baugh then spoke of the charge 
for bread and butter, and told some 
interesting things about our Dining Car 
Department. 

"This department," he said, "is the 
fifth in size in the United States, and 
from the number of cars operated is 
third. We have twenty-five dining cars, 
ten parlor cafe cars, eight cafe coaches, 
and only one grill car — and thank the 
Lord for that. (Laughter.) 

"We also have fifteen extra cars of all 
kinds, making a total of fifty-nine cars, 
and have three store-rooms, one in 
Baltimore, one in Cincinnati, and one in 
Pittsburgh." 

Mr. Baugh also spoke of our coach 
lunch service, which provides refresh- 
ments for many who would not use the 
dining cars, and thanked Mr. Willard and 
Mr. Thompson for their cooperation. 

"The Dining Car Department, myself 
at least, is not entitled to all the praise 
that is being showered upon it. I have 
divided it in this way — to the Mechanical 
Department I am going to give 12 3^ per 
cent, for the good condition in which 
they keep our cars. I am going to give 
12 J/2 per cent, to the Operating Depart- 
ment for the way in which they handle 
our cars, and 12J/2 per cent, to the 
Passenger Department for the support 
that they have given us. Twelve and 
four-tenths per cent. I am going to give 



16 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



■HI 




to my boss— he is entitled to it. The 
remaining one-tenth per cent. I am going 
to take myself for this reason (he didn't 
say to whom was due the other 50 per 
cent.): we have handled floods and 
washouts, turned somersaults for the 
Marshal of France, acted as butler for 
Mr. Balfour and become moving picture 
actors for Mr. Lowes, but there isn't a 
man in the room who has made us send 
out an S. 0. S." 

The chairman then spoke of our fine 
passenger service, saying that without 
doubt our engineers were doing the very 
best braking in the country. He then 
introduced C. W. Woolford, secretary to 
the Company, who told some interesting 
things about the history of our railroad. 
Mr. Woolford's address will be printed in 
full in a later issue of the Magazine. 

Chief Engineer Lane Tells of 
Improvements 

The chairman then called upon H. A. 
Lane, chief engineer, who told of the 
many improvements recently completed, 
or now under way on our road. The 
most important of these, the new Curtis 
Bay Export Coal Pier, was fully described 
in the June issue of the Magazine. 
Other improvements are a McMyler 
unloading machine and a thawing shed 
at Arlington, Staten Island, and the 
enlargement of the Arlington Yard; the 
changing of our east and west line in 
Philadelphia, which will give us access 
to the Delaware River water front terri- 
tory; improvements at Locust Point, 
Baltimore, consisting of a new double 
deck shed pier (Pier 6) 1,000 by 130 
feet, the rebuilding of Pier No. 5, and the 
installation of modern unloading machin- 
ery, and the rebuilding of Piers Nos. 
34 and 35; the elimination of grade 
crossings at Cumberland; the renewal of 
a number of small bridges on the Con- 
nellsville Division; the construction of a 
connection between Hampton, on the 
Monongah Division, and Adrian, on the 
Coal and Coke Railroad, which will 
improve operating conditions in the 
West Virginia and Pittsburgh Districts; 
the elimination of the grade crossing at 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



17 



Liberty Avenue, Pittsburgh, and the 
renewal of the viaduct leading to the 
Allegheny River bridge; the laying of 
double track, the elimination of grade 
crossing and the construction of a pas- 
senger station and a freight house on the 
Chicago Division; the renewal of bridges 
on the Southwestern; the construction of 
a connection between the Wellston and 
Toledo Divisions at Dayton; and the 
construction of the Long Fork Railway 
in Eastern Kentucky, from which it is 
estimated we shall receive 1,800,000 tons 
of coal the first year, and 4,000,000 tons 
per year within three years. 

Automatic signals are being installed 
on certain sections of our line and pas- 
senger stations have been constructed 
at Malloneton, Pa., Canton, Defiance 
and Barnesville, Ohio, and Flora, 111. 
Twelve new freight stations have been 
constructed. Various other improve- 
ments are contemplated, and through the 
work of the Commercial Development 
Department in inducing industrial plants 
to locate on our line many industrial 
lines are being built, notably our Patapsco 
Neck Branch, five miles long, which will 
reach the plant of the Pen-Mary Steel 
Co., at Sparrows Point, recently estab- 
lished by Charles M. Schwab. 

Mr. Lane also spoke of the engineering 
problems in connection with National 
Army cantonments on our lines. 

Mr. Thompson then called upon W. H. 
Manss, assistant to the vice-president, 
in charge of the Commercial Develop- 
ment Department, who spoke inter- 
estingly on the work of his department. 
His address will be printed in full in the 
September issue of the Magazine. Mr. 
Thompson then called upon several 
gentlemen to rise, so that the assembled 
officers would have an opportunity to 
know them. Among them were W. W. 
Blakely, interchange commodity agent; 
George C. Smith, agent industrial survey; 
H. W. Hartzel, chief of industrial bureau, 
and the industrial agents present; Dr. 
Grimsley, of the Geological Department, 
and A. C. Spurr, special agent. 

In closing the session Mr. Thompson 
said: u We heard such a good and sincere 
address by our president, whom we have 
followed as a leader now for eight years 



(he has come and talked to us each year) 
and who now brings us a message that 
I want to call to your attention as force- 
fully as I can — that is, what they are 
expecting of the railroads and of the 
transportation systems of the country. 
By doing what he has asked us to do, by 
giving him the support that he rightly 
deserves and that we should give him 
and that he has every right to expect, 
we support the President of the United 
States, we support this nation, and I 
want every man who is willing to give 
the fullest support that he possibly can, 
and thereby serve his country as well as 
this railroad, and serve a man who is 
earnestly working eighteen hours a day, 
to rise." 

The session adjourned with every man 
pledging the support that Mr. Thompson 
asked. 

The Session of the Accounting, Claims, 
Treasury and Relief Departments 

The morning of Saturday, June 30, 
was devoted to the session of the depart- 
ments reporting to vice-president George 
M. Shriver. George H. Campbell, as- 
sistant to the president, was in the chair, 
and opened the meeting by reading a 
telegram expressing Mr. Shriver's regret 
that important business made it impos- 
sible for him to attend the meeting. 
Vice-president Thompson then offered a 
resolution expressing the regret of the 
officers at Mr. Shriver's absence, which 
was carried unanimously. Mr. Camp- 
bell's opening address follows: 

Mr. Campbell's Address 

"I very much regret Mr. Shriver's 
absence for many reasons. I wish he 
might have been here yesterday to hear 
Mr. Willard's address, and today to 
preside. Mr. Shriver is a friend of every- 
body, his counsel is sought by almost 
everyone who knows him, and he is held 
in high esteem, and I know that we all 
feel his absence today. 

" There are two things that our presi- 
dent said to us yesterday — it was all 
good, but there were two things that 
were impressed very strongly upon 
my mind. One was that in order to 



18 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



meet the situation abroad we must meet it 
with engines and cars and material things. 
If we did not, we would have to meet it 
with the flesh and blood of our own sons. 
I speak feelingly because I have one son 
in the Army at present and one who is 
subject to draft, and there are many 
others I know in the audience in the same 
situation, and therefore if we will heed 
what Mr. Willard said we will probably 
save ourselves and others much sorrow 
and regret. We have in the Scriptures 
verifying what he said about neutrality: 
'He that is not with me is against me/ 
and you cannot be neutral in the situa- 
tion that confronts the world today. I 
myself felt greatly benefited. My only 
regret was that every employe of the 
Baltimore and Ohio — the 77,000 men — 
could not every one of them have heard 
that address and gone away from here 
enthused and fortified to meet the situa- 
tion which confronts us all. 

"It has been suggested, and I think 
very appropriately, that as the executor 
of his estate I should say something in 
regard to the late chairman of the board, 
Mr. Oscar G. Murray, 'who died March 
14. He met here, as you know, in the 
past at these meetings, and it would 
seem that this was an appropriate time to 
speak of his work and the provisions of 
his will for the benefit of the families of 
the employes. 

"Mr. Murray's service with the Com- 
pany extended over a period of twenty- 
one years, as vice-president, receiver, 
vice-president again, then president and 
lastly chairman. Probably he will be best 
remembered in the business and financial 
world for the work that he did during the 
receivership in securing business for the 
Baltimore and Ohio that enabled them to 
reorganize the property without foreclos- 
ure and sale. The visible monument that 
probably we will see most of is the Balti- 
more and Ohio Building in Baltimore, 
built under his administration; and last 
but not least is the provision he has made 
in his will for the widows and orphans of 
the employes of the Baltimore and Ohio 
who have died in the- service of the 
Company. 

"Mr. Murray left an estate of approxi- 
mately 1900,000; After providing a trust 



fund of $300,000 for certain people who 
were dependent upon him, and some 
bequests — some very generous bequests 
to those who were associated with him — 
he leaves the remainder of his estate to 
trustees for the benefit of the widows and 
the orphans of our employes. 

"The fourth clause of the will reads: 

Oscar G. Murray Railroad Employes 
Benefit Fund 

" 'I direct my executors, immediately 
after my death, to cause to be incorpo- 
rated under the laws of the State of Mary- 
land a charitable corporation to be known 
as the Oscar G. Murray Railroad Employes 
Benefit Fund (the name of which shall in 
no event be changed) for the relief and 
assistance of needy widows and orphans 
of employes of The Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad Company, who have died in the 
service of that Company. The charter 
of said corporation shall be so drawn that 
such relief may be given by the estab- 
lishment of a home for such widows and 
orphans, or by aiding them in their own 
homes, or aiding them in any other ways 
which the Trustees of said corporation 
may, from time to time, deem best suited 
to promote their welfare and shall pro- 
vide that preference shall be given to the 
widows and orphans of employes living 
in Baltimore City. 

" 'All the rest, residue and remainder 
of my estate, after the payments herein- 
before directed to be made, including any 
sums which may become a part of the 
residue of my estate on account of the 
death of any of the legatees above named 
before my death, and including any sums 
becoming a part of the residue of my 
estate after the death of the persons 
entitled to the income therefrom for life, 
I give, devise and bequeath to said George 
Hollister Campbell and Francis Lightfoot 
Lee, or either of them or to their suc- 
cessors, executor or executors, in accord- 
ance with the provisions hereinbefore set 
forth in Section First in trust immedi- 
ately upon the formation of said corpora- 
tion to transfer the same to the said 
Oscar G. Murray Railroad Employes Bene- 
fit Fund the corporation to be formed 
aforesaid, to use the income thereof for 
the relief and assistance of needy widows 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



19 



and orphans of employes of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad Company dying 
in the service of said Company, in accord- 
ance with the provisions of the charter 
of the said corporation hereinbefore di- 
rected to be procured by my executors.' 

" Acting on that provision of the will 
the trustees have been selected, the in- 
corporation papers will probably be taken 
out within the next week or two. Mr. 
Willard has very kindly consented to act 
as one of the trustees. In fact, the presi- 
dent of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
is always to be a member of the Board of 
Trustees. The president of Johns Hop- 
kins University, Dr. Frank J. Goodnow, 
and the Bishop of the Episcopal Church 
for the Diocese of Maryland, the Rt. Rev. 
John Gardner Murray, are to be members 
of the Board. These three gentlemen, 
or their successors in those institu- 
tions, are expected always to be members 
of the Board of Trustees. The other 
members of the Board as first organized 
will be George M. Shriver, George F. 
Randolph, who was formerly vice-presi- 
dent of traffic, Herbert R. Preston, the 
general solicitor of the Company, and 
myself. Mr. Willard has very kindly 
offered the use of the organization — the 
Relief Department — with which to look 
after the details, keep the records, etc., 
of this Fund, and the treasurer of the 
Baltimore and Ohio will act as treasurer 
of the Fund, and the secretary of the 
Company as the secretary. Mr. Willard 
has also offered the Board Room of the 
Baltimore and Ohio Building as the 
place for the meetings of the Board of 
Trustees, this with a view to reducing 
the expenses so that every dollar that 
accrues from this Fund may go directly 
to those for whom it was intended. 

"The Fund will probably start with 
$400,000, bringing in an income of $20,000 
a year, which would take care of sixty to 
seventy families at $25 a month; that is 
only an estimate, but you can see what 
will be accomplished by it. 

"It appears that Mr. Murray in his 
life- time had been called on (and had done 
it with great pleasure) to help a great 
many people. He saw that there was a 
point where help from the Relief organi- 
sations, of the railroad terminatetl, and 



when the bread-winner died there was 
nobody left to take care of the family. 
I have a case that has already applied 
for help, a widow eighty years old. Her 
husband was a pensioner for many years 
and has passed away and she is left with 
practically nothing. When a man dies he 
may leave a family absolutely dependent. 
This fund will come in just at that point 
and take care of families that have no 
other means of support. I am, of course, 
only one of the Board of Trustees and 
therefore what I say may be changed, 
but I think that every case will have to 
be decided on its merits. No hard and 
fast rules will govern. It must be gov- 
erned by the oircumstances and condi- 
tions as they exist. 

"Another point that I have made up 
my mind pretty fully on is this, it is not 
to the interest of the Fund to provide a 
home. Most people who are dependent 
do not want to be advertised as having 
to go to a home. Mr. Murray in his 
will leaves that open, saying, 'a home or 
such other means or ways as may be 
deemed best' to help them; and the other 
members of the proposed Board of 
Trustees with whom I have talked en- 
tertain the same opinion — that the 
money can be used to very much better 
advantage by applying it directly than 
by providing a home. The cost of up- 
keep and administration would take that 
much out of the Fund and, therefore, I 
think that the Board will decide that 
they will help families in their own 
homes. 

"As I say, this Fund, as it will stand at 
the beginning, will probably be $400,000, 
and the other Trust Fund for the benefit 
of certain people in their life-time will, at 
the termination of that period, revert to 
this Fund, so that eventually there will 
be probably $700,000 in the Fund. There 
was $100,000 in bequests, and probably 
$60,000 or $70,000 to pay the taxes- 
inheritance and other taxes — demanded 
by the State and National Governments. 
But the Fund will, I think, have an income 
of $30,000 to $35,000 a year eventually. 

"Among other things which Mr. Mur- 
ray did in his life-time was to provide 
organs for the Railroad Y. M. C. A. work — 
he gave one to the Riverside Y. M. C. A. 



20 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



— and one of his last appearances in public 
was at the dedication of the organ given 
the Railroad Y. M. C. A. at Brunswick 
during the past winter, and which he re- 
called as being one of the happy occasions 
of his life, and his remarks made at the 
dedication will long be remembered. Just 
a little time before his passing he told 
Mr. Egan — who Mr. Murray had in many 
ways used to carry out his charitable 
bequests — that he could arrange to buy 
an organ for the Railroad Y. M. C. A. at 
Cumberland, and the Court has approved 
that, not only the organ but also a 
mechanical player. It is expected that 
the organ will be dedicated in the Cumber- 
land Railroad Y. M. C. A. some time 
during the fall. 

"Just a word more of the personal. 
Mr. Murray was a man without family, 
having never married, but with a kindly 
heart for the welfare of others. He was 
born in Bridgeport, Connecticut, and 
afterwards moved to Albany, where his 
parents died and were buried, and where 
his remains were taken after the funeral 
service in Baltimore. He left no blood 
relations. 

"I thought, my friends, that it would 
be fitting at this time to make this state- 
ment to you about the situation. There 
has been very little publicity given to it 
but I felt you were all interested in it, 
or your families will be. I want to say 
just one more word in closing. Shortly 
before Mr. Murray's passing, in a talk I 
had with him in his apartments in Balti- 
more, he said to me that of all the friends 
he had made in later years there was 
none he prized more highly than Mr. 
Willard (applause). 

Mr. Willard and Officers Pay Silent Tribute 
to Mr. Murray's Memory 

Mr. Willard then rose to express his 
appreciation of Mr. Murray's services to 
our road. 

"It would be unnecessary for me," 
he said, "to add anything to what Mr. 
Campbell lias said about Mr. Murray. 
He served the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad long and faithfully and well. J 
had OCCa&ioJD to know him very slightly 
eighteen years ago, when I was assistant 



general manager, but I knew him inti- 
mately during the last eight years. Our 
relations at first were rather casual, as 
we saw little of each other, but as time 
went on and we became more intimately 
acquainted I found great help in Mr. 
Murray's steadiness of view and sound 
common sense, and I was always glad of 
an opportunity to discuss matters with 
him; and I can say of Mr. Murray that 
toward no man, toward no friend that I 
have had in the later years of my life, have 
I felt more kindly than I did toward 
Mr. Murray. In fact, that feeling that 
he held toward Baltimore and Ohio 
employes was best expressed in the terms 
of his will which Mr. Campbell has just 
read. 

"It is unfortunate in this life, as things 
are ordered, that when men do things of 
that character they are so frequently 
reluctant to let it be known during their 
life-time, and they thus deprive their 
friends of the opportunity to say to them 
the things that they would like to say. 
Whether in the hereafter people who have 
passed on are conscious of what we are 
doing — that is a moot question, and of it 
we have no definite knowledge. We 
would all be glad to know that Mr. 
Murray could know our feelings here 
today, I am sure. Perhaps he does. 

"I want to suggest this one thing, Mr. 
Chairman, and I think it is fitting on 
such an occasion as this, when we are 
discussing the memory of the man who 
served this Company faithfully for so 
many years and at his death left such 
evidence of his friendship. I just want 
to ask all my associate officers in this 
room to rise and stand silently for thirty 
seconds, as a tribute to his memory." 

The officers arose and stood silent for a 
half-minute as a tribute to the memory 
of the departed official, a personal friend 
of many in the room. Mr. Campbell 
then said that the amount that would go 
to the employes of our Company under 
the provisions of Mr. Murray's will 
represents Mr. Murray's entire salary 
lor liis twenty-one years' service with the 
Company. He (hen introduced J. J. 
Ekin, genera] auditor, who spoke of the 
need of cooperation between all depart- 
ments in these trying times. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



21 



At the conclusion of Mr. Ekin's ad- 
dress Mr. Willard asked the privilege of 
the floor, remarking that he wanted to 
add a word to Mr. Ekin's well-deserved 
tribute to vice-president George M. 
Shriver, the head of his department. 
He said that Mr. Patterson, the counsel 
of the Pennsylvania Railroad, who had 
charge of the rate case, told him, just 
before the case was finished, that whether 
the case was won or lost, the work that 
Mr. Shriver and Mr. Ekin had done 
would contribute more to the success, if 
we had success, than that of all the others. 

"I want Mr. Ekin's associates to 
know," he said, "that his work is appre- 
ciated not only in Baltimore and Ohio 
circles, but also in Washington." 

The next speaker was J. M. Wat kins, 
auditor of revenue, who spoke wittily and 
interestingly of the work of his depart- 
ment, and pledged its loyalty to Mr. 
Willard and the Government. 

He was followed by C. C. Glessner, 
auditor of freight claims, whose address 
is printed in full in another part of this 
issue. 

The chairman then spoke of the neces- 
sity of reducing freight claims, saying 
that if they were eliminated, the amount 
of money now used in that way would be 
sufficient to pay an additional one per 
cent, on our common stock. He then 
called upon G. H. Pryor, auditor of dis- 
bursements, who after remarking that he 
had often been asked for a good clean-cut 
definition of accountancy, said that of 
the many answers to the question he 
had heard one that seemed best to him, 
which was: " Accountancy is the yard 
stick of commercial accomplishment." 
He then spoke of some of our expenses. 
His address will be printed in full in a 
later issue of the Magazine. Mr. Pryor 
was followed by W. J. Dudley, assistant 
superintendent of the Relief Department, 
whose remarks will be printed in a later 
issue. 

J. Hampton Baumgartner, publicity 
representative of the Company, spoke of 
the good that the right kind of publicity 
can do in acquainting the public with the 
problems and work of the railroads in 
this time of grave crisis. The meeting 
was then adjourned 



The Session of the Operating 
Department 

The afternoon session of June 30 was 
devoted to discussions relative to the 
Operating Department. Vice-president 
Davis presided. A large number of 
subjects had been selected but owing to 
the limited time it was not possible to 
call on everyone to talk who had been 
listed. The opening address was made 
by Mr. Davis. 

He said : 

Mr. Davis' Address 

"This is the third Deer Park meeting 
that I have attended, and in addition to 
the incalculable benefits derived by those 
who are privileged to be here, the enjoy- 
ment obtained from these gatherings 
always makes the time for the next a 
matter of pleasurable anticipation. 

"The past year, and more especially 
the past few months, have been trying 
times for those engaged in the water and 
rail transportation business, and the tide 
has not yet reached its flood. 

"Because of the urgent requirements of 
the Government for men in various 
branches of service, including the selective 
draft, it is inevitable that a large number 
of our men will be utilized by the Govern- 
ment, and this will cause a continuance 
of, and increase in, the number of changes 
in the personnel of our forces. 

"In order to fill positions made vacant 
by men entering the service of the Gov- 
ernment, women have been employed for 
such positions as they are capable of 
filling, and at the present time there are 
women employed in the Operating Depart- 
ment in order to release men in the follow- 
ing positions for the government service : 
Drill press operators, clerks, cashiers, 
laborers, car cleaners, stenographers, 
agents, car preparers, crossing watch- 
women, telephone operators, office and 
station cleaners, matrons, car oilers, loco- 
motive cleaners, janitress, less carload 
tallywomen, work checkers, telegraph 
operators, shop cleaners, ticket clerks, 
icing passenger trains, baggage checkers, 
parcel room checkers, machine operators, 
truckers, car repairwomen, checkers, 
stenographers and clerks, work report 
checkers, yard clerks, blacksmith helpers, 



22 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



painters, painter helpers, dope reclaimers, 
tool room attendants, box packers, special 
collector, tender repairwomen, station 
baggagewomen, machinist helpers, motor 
operators. 

"It is realized that this is a departure 
from established practices, and that until 
we have more experience some mistakes 
will be made. Some of our supervising 
officers and employes will not look upon 
the woman employe as seriously as 
they should. This is a matter that re- 
quires very careful consideration, and 
women should not be employed for work 
which it is known they cannot handle 
efficiently and satisfactorily, and only 
women who really wish to earn their 
living should be employed. At points 
where women are taken into the service 
it is the desire of the management that 
prompt action be taken in furnishing the 
necessary facilities for their comfort. 

"The department upon which a great 
strain has been placed as a result of the 
abnormal conditions now prevailing is the 
Transportation Department. This de- 
partment is being called upon for statis- 
1 ical and other information from various 
( Commissions, Governmental and others, 
the more recent acquisitions to which 
have been the Car Service Commission, 
the Lake Bituminous Coal Pool, the 
Tidewater Bituminous Coal Pool and the 
Iron Ore Commission — and it is expected 
that a Coke Commission will shortly be 
formed. It ,can readily be appreciated 
what this means in the way of additional 
work for the transportation office, and 
everyone should exert his best efforts to 
relieve the strain on that department as 
much as is possible by keeping them fully 
informed about matters upon which they 
should be informed and by confining re- 
quests on the transportation office for 
(lata and reports to actual necessity. 

"A word about our equipment : About 
ninety-two per cent, of our freight 
equipment is now either all-steel or steel 
underframe, and the total number of bad 
order freighl cars on the System equals 
only two and one-half per cent, of the 
total freight equipment owned. We do 
not wish the Dumber to increase beyond 
t his percentage. This should be possible, 
:i- .ill of our old equipment lias been dis- 



mantled and written off the books, and 
there should be no accumulation of bad 
order cars at any point during the period 
of car shortage for commercial loading. 
During the last year we have added sixty- 
five cars for express service, and within 
the next sixty days will add thirty-seven 
additional such cars, making a total of 
102 express cars added, and in addition 
we will receive in the next sixty days 100 
all-steel passenger cars. 

"At the present time we have a lower 
number of locomotives awaiting shop than 
at any previous time of which we have 
record. Our president desires that the 
total number of locomotives in shop and 
awaiting shop shall not exceed six per cent, 
of the total locomotives owned. This is 
a low mark, but very desirable, and we 
will exert every effort to attain this de- 
sirable result, and expect to do so by 
September. Today 7.2 per cent, of our 
locomotives are out of service for classi- 
fied repairs, 5.7 per cent, being in shop 
now undergoing repairs and 3.4 per cent, 
awaiting repairs. 

"Our passenger equipment is improving 
rapidly, and with the 100 new passenger 
cars which we should receive in August and 
September we should be able to gradually 
increase the number of steel cars in some 
of our important local trains, after all 
through trains have been so equipped. 

"Travel on our passenger trains is in- 
creasing, particularly between Chicago 
and Washington and New York and 
Washington, in both directions — all of 
which is reflected in the increased passen- 
ger earnings. We hope to continue this 
march of progress by handling our trains 
on schedule; by seeing that they are 
handled so that passengers will be com- 
fortable, and by instilling in our employes 
the great asset of courteous attention. 

"We anticipate laying 100,000 tons of 
new ninety pound and one hundred 
pound rail (mostly one hundred pound) 
on the System this calendar year, and 
have 25,000 tons of one hundred pound 
rail, purchased in L916, to be delivered 
in 1918. At this time there is no rail in 
the main (lack between Philadelphia and 
Chicago that is less than ninety pound in 
weight, and by December L, 83.06 per 
cent, of the rail between New York and 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



23 



Chicago will be one hundred and one hun- 
dred and twenty pound, the remainder, 
or 16.94 per cent., being ninety pound. 

"In January, we were apprehensive of 
our tie receipts for 1917, but sufficient 
ties are now on hand to carry us through 
the present calendar year, and to have a 
surplus with which to start in 1918. 

"During the twelve months ending 
July 1 our Commercial Development De- 
partment has located on our rails 731 
industries requiring the construction of 
new tracks, a great number of which have 
already been constructed. As I view the 
situation at this time, because of so many 
men taking service with the Government, 
in order to avoid delaying such work it 
will be desirable and necessary that 
general managers contract as much of the 
new industrial track work as can be so 
handled economically throughout the 
industrial and mining districts on our line, 
as it is not our intention to accept the 
excuse of shortage of labor for rough 
track next winter. On two divisions, one 
in Ohio and one in Pennsylvania, I am 
told track gangs, consisting of high 
school boys who desired to work during 
the summer, were organized. These 
gangs were composed of lads of mixed 
sizes, the smaller of them were given the 
lighter classes of work to handle, and all 
are giving splendid accounts of them- 
selves. 

"In closing, I wish to impress upon the 
supervising officers in the Operating De- 
partment the importance of keeping in 
close touch with our employes, and to 
learn as far as possible in advance of 
those who will be taken from our service 
by the Government, and of so organizing 
forces as to cause the least disturbance 
possible in the handling of our business. 
It is the desire of our president, and I am 
sure of every officer and employe, that 
when this war is ended it will be recorded 
in our National history that the Balti- 
more and Ohio, in serving the Government 
during the World War, as well as during 
the Civil War, 'did its bit.'^ 

Movement of Freight and Transportation 
Methods 

C. W. Galloway, general manager of 
the western lines, was the next speaker. 



His topic was "Maximum Movement of 
Freight." The greatest room for im- 
provement, he said, lies in the terminal 
sit nation. He dwelt, upon the various 
elements that interfere with maximum 
operations and pointed to the means to 
be employed in solving these problems. 

The next paper was on ''Trans- 
portation Methods/' presented by R. N. 
Begien, general manager of eastern lines, 
who spoke of the close relation between 
transportation methods and accidents. 
A careful plan of action to reduce acci- 
dents to a minimum, he said, will do more 
towards improving or meeting the present 
situation that any other one thing. 

Loading cars to full capacity, having 
shippers consign cars billed for New 
York to their final specific point in that 
city and a request for additional west- 
bound business from that port were the 
pertinent suggestions made by the next 
speaker, W. H. Averell, general manager 
New York terminal lines, whose subject 
was "New York Situation." 

"Maintenance of Equipment Plans," 
was then discussed by F. H. Clark, gen- 
eral superintendent of motive power, who 
told of the efforts being made to hold 
bad-order cars about where they are, 
that is, not let them exceed two and one- 
half per cent. The six per cent, limit 
which Mr. Willard set on locomotives in 
and awaiting classified repairs, under- 
going classified repairs, was an unheard 
of figure, said Mr. Clark, but he added, 
"we may find some way to do it." 

H. Emerson, special engineer, then 
spoke on "Efficiency." He said the 
losses in industry due to waste amount to 
$50,000,000 a day. Many of them, he 
said, are to be prevented by a few pre- 
cepts. He called particular attention to 
efficiency of spirit rather than of work, 
and pointed to the spirit shown by the 
Allies in the present European struggle. 

" Car Supply" was the next topic under 
discussion. J. R. Kearney, general 
superintendent of transportation, told of 
the efforts being made to furnish a full 
coal car supply. Following out an order 
issued by the Committee on National 
Defense to give preference in the move- 
ment of coal and ore and that hopper 
cars particularly should be confined to 



24 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



that trade, ho said, instruct ions have 
been issued that an open car should not 
be used where a box car could be used, 
and that coal and ore and empt}' open 
car equipment must be given preference 
in movement. 

M. K. Barnum, assistant to vice- 
president Davis, followed with an address 
on "Gathering Scrap and Good Material 
on Line." Mr. Barnum's paper will be 
run in full in a coming number of the 
Magazine. 

General superintendent J. F. Keegan 
was the next speaker. His subject was 
" Passenger Trains on Schedule — Advan- 
tages to Freight Traffic." He said the 
matter was one that concerned every 
operating officer, for it is not hard to 
realize how easy it is for a belated pas- 
senger train to disorganize or disarrange 
all plans that have been made for the 
efficiency of road or yard operations. 
The principal cause of delays, he said, 
were slow work at terminals or at 
stations, delays in terminals or stations, 
many of which are avoidable, inefficient 
handling, slow orders, and, in some cases, 
the movement of power. 

J. D. McCubbin, real estate agent, 
gave a short talk on "Real Estate." He 
said more money is wasted in the Real 
Estate Department by reason of too 
much conversation, or nearly as much, 
as by improper loading and various other 
things discussed at the gathering. 

"Fast Freight Train Performance," 
largely depends on starting on time, said 
the next speaker, M. H. Cahill, general 
superintendent. The same topic was 
discussed by general superintendent H. B. 
Voorhees. An outline of the signal work 
under way was set forth by F. P. Patenall, 
signal engineer. 

General superintendent F. E. Blaser 
was the next speaker. His paper was on 
"Yard Operations — Eight Hour Basis." 
C. Scldcn, superintendent of telegraph, 
followed with a talk on " Unnecessary 



Telegraphing and Telephoning." "Traffic 
Regulating" was the next topic. This 
paper was presented by W. G. Curren, 
superintendent of transportation. 

W. L. Robinson, supervisor of fuel 
consumption, spoke on "Stokers — Results 
— Tonnage Handled — Fuel Consumed." 
The speech in full will appear in an early 
number of the Magazine. 

"Passenger Train Performance" was 
then discussed. General superintendent 

E. W. Scheer told of the performance of 
passenger trains on the Baltimore and 
Ohio, and pointed out the principal 
causes of delays. The efforts of the 
Timber Preservation Department to meet 
the cross tie situation were related by 

F. J. Angier, superintendent of that 
department, who spoke on "Ties — Use 
and Supplying." 

Colonel Charles D. Hine, special repre- 
sentative of the president, followed with a 
short talk on the war. He said, among 
other things, that every man present at the 
gathering was a fellow soldier in the great 
national undertaking in which America is 
engaged for the righteous liberty of man- 
kind. 

J. T. Carroll, assistant general superin- 
tendent of motive power, made an address 
on "Shop Machinery and Tools." He 
urged his audience to keep an eye on the 
ever changing methods of doing work in 
shops and to study means by which the 
necessity for machine tools can be 
reduced. 

" Property Protection— Cooperation," 
was the subject of Edmund Leigh, general 
superintendent of police, who told of the 
work of his department in handling and 
of the efforts being made to secure closer 
cooperation from other departments. 

The next speaker was F. J. Hickey, of 
the Wells Fargo & Company Express, 
who gave some statistics concerning his 
company and complimented the Balti- 
more and Ohio Company on the excellent 
service it is giving. 



□ ■ 




Make Your Letters Brief — Busy people have no 
time to read poorly written letters or post cards 



A EDITOR'S FAREWELL TO HIS 
READERS 



DEAR MR. MAGAZINE READER: 

When old Bill Holenzolen got fresh and pushed Uncle Sam off of that 
there verge of war what he had been wearing smooth ever since them German 
low-lifes sunk the Lusitiania and Uncle Sam got sore and rolled up his shirt 
sleeves and started in to show them Germans what we boys are made of 
old Bob Van Sant and Herb Stitt they went and went in the Officer's Training 
Corpse. "Grahame you big stiff" they says "you run the Magazine because 
you ain't no good for fighting account of your lookers being so bad you can't 
even get no pleasure standing in front of the new gas Building on a windy 
day." So I says all right because they has turned me down for the training 
camp account that poor boob of a doctor not giving me no fair show reading 
them eye cards of his. 

Well ever since then I run the Magazine, and John T. Broderick and some 
other fellers said I run it all right but every time I sees a feller in a uniform I 
feels like a yellow pup and I ain't happy when I feel that-a-way although 
often deserved. So when the time for the second training camp comes around 
I goes and applies and gets examined by a doctor what knew something and 
gets in and as soon as I can borrow enough kale to buy a wrist watch I'm 
going to Fort Myer because you can't be no soldier without a wrist watch to 
tell you what time to quit work. 

This here Magazine has written up lots of fellers but we ain't never written 
up ourselfs and I got this to say we had four fellers here in the office when the 
war started and everyone of them went and asked to go before he got invited 
by a blue card and if you can beat that record lets hear about it say we. Old 
Bob Van Sant he's a lieut. in the National Army now and stands up so straight 
he slants backwards and Herb Stitt he went to the training camp but the 
breaks was against him and he didn't have no luck but he has hopes and 
Heinie Weber the boss' secretary he joined the Hospital Corpse and I'm going 
to Fort Myer as soon as I get the money for that there wrist watch. 

But before I change from a editor to a buck private I want to say thanks to 
some fellers who helped me and Van a lot. Roy Clark out in Chicago, he's a 
regular guy and has give us lots of good stuff and I hope he keeps it up and 
H. Irving Martin the debater, what made up Mr Way-Bill and lots of other 
good pieces for the Magazine and Doc Parlett who has give me some good 
dinners and lots of news although he bawled me out to my girl and spoiled my 
reputation, and Chief Leigh, who wrote all about policemen and other hobos, 
and all the correspondents on the Divisions and lots and lots of other fellers 
too numerous to mention who have helped us, including the boys in the Print 
Shop, even George Leilich who although a crab on the telephone is otherwise 
all right, and Mike Conroy who knows how to spell things what I don't and 
all the other boys what didn't kick if they happened to get some dirty copy 
when we was in a rush — me and Van thank them all and hope they help out 
the new editor just as much. 

The new editor's name is Frank A. O'Connell and he has worked on news- 
papers for eight years so there aint nothing you can say that can hurt his 
feelings but he will appreciate a little human kindness and may be deserving 
of the same although his business is against it. Best of good luck to him say 
I and may every issue be better than the one before it. 

Well, I hate to say good by to all you guys but I've got to pull out of here 
for Fort Myer. After that I don't know where I'm going but I'm on my way. 

Hoping this finds you the same, Yours truly, 

ARTHUR W. GRAHAME. 





The Freight Yards 

By Phoebe Hoffman 

in "Contemporary Poetry" 

IN THEJong'spring evening's twilight, when the sun 
is setting low, 
And the smoke from all the engines flushes up, 
a rosy glow, 

Then I come up to the bridge-head, watch the lights 

and net-work rails, 
Think of when I rode the freighters — engines spouting 

steam like whales, 
D. L. W., Jersey Central, old Rock Island, Pere 

Marquette, 

Reading coal cars down for Scranton, piled with 

anthracite like jet ; 
N. and W., the Great Northern, Lehigh Valley, B. & O., 
Like a giant earth-worm twisting, slowly round the 

curve they flow, 
Caravans of freight move westward, bearing eastern 

goods away, 

To come back with hogs and cattle, bales of sweet 

Kentucky hay, 
Brakemen walk along the roof-tops, lingering for a 

moment's chat; 
There an engineer, while smoking, long and eloquently 

spat. 

Wandering life and care-free rovers, seasoned in 

adventure bold, 
In the old caboose at night time many a thrilling tale is 

told, 

But on duty in the winter, when there's hail and ice 
and snow, 

And the rails and roofs are ice-cased, and you slip each 
step you go, 

Or the melting, boiling summer, when the blisters 

lump the paint, 
And the fierce sun strikes directly, and you feel you're 

like to faint, 

That's the time you curse the life out, striking for a 
rise in pay, 

Say a dog has better living, but you can't quite get away, 
For the rugged freedom holds you, spite of freezing 

cold and sweat, 
And the grating, grinding thunder of the freights you 

can't forget, 

L. and N., D. L. & W., Erie, Reading, P. R. R., 
Riding on your sliding roof-tops, that's where joy and 
freedom are ! 




Cut Courtesy Railroad M«» s Magaztnt 



Freight Loss and Damage Claims — Their 
Causes and Possible Cure 



An Address by C. C. Glessner, Auditor of Freight Claims, 
at the Deer Park Staff Conference, June 30, 1917 



SVERY railroad man knows that 
operating methods have been 
revolutionized in the last fifty 
years. The casual reader smiles 
when his eye meets some of the. instruc- 
tions to employes which railway mana- 
gers deemed necessary a half century 
ago. One operating rule in the early 
days of railway transportation required 
that all trains be brought to a stand- 
still at crossings, and that before pro- 
ceeding the trainmen should see that 
all tracks were cleared. While rules of 
this type were born of the spirit of 
" Safety First/' it did not take many 
years of operation to show railway 
executives that such methods must be 
passed into the scrap heap and that 
speed in operation as well as safety was 
a necessity if railways were to really 
serve their purpose. 

The loss and damage claim was born 
soon after the first freight train moved 
to its destination. In a copy of a 
Baltimore and Ohio tariff, dated 1863, 
are found a number of references to loss 
and damage claims. The regulations 
laid down in this relic of a bygone era 
are so unique that you will no doubt 
receive them with the respect due to 
their age. 
To quote: 

" Claims for loss and damage must be 
presented within twenty-four hours after 
the delivery of the goods, or if delivery 
be due, within ten days after their failure 
to arrive. 

"The Railway Company will not be 
accountable for breakage of glass, glass- 



ware and marble or for damage to the 
hidden contents of packages, nor for 
deficiency in dry-goods, boots, shoes, 
hats, etc., unless the packages were 
properly strapped and sealed when 
shipped. 

"No responsibility is assumed for 
leakage of liquids, breakage of stoves or 
other fragile wares. 

"All melting of ice, decay of vege- 
tables, fruit, fish, meats, game and other 
perishable articles must be at owner's 
exclusive risk." 

It is unnecessary to call attention to 
the fact that these regulations are 
ineffective at this day. 

How ideal, from a revenue standpoint, 
would be the operation of the Baltimore 
and Ohio Railroad if such regulations 
were effective in the year 1917. As you 
see, the railroads in 1863 made money 
by transporting merchandise under 
regulations which shifted much of the 
burden of care to the shoulders of shipper 
or owner. Since that year the human 
element backed by safety appliances, 
interlocking switches, semaphores, heavier 
equipment, better roadbed and heavier 
rails has reduced injuries to pas- 
sengers to a minimum. Yet, to our 
sorrow, we have not been able to move 
our freight traffic with the same degree 
of safety. Increase in passenger traffic 
renders it imperative that the manage- 
ment adopt the most improved methods 
for passenger transportation and exercise 
all possible vigilance. Increase in freight 
traffic, however, brings with it an increase 
in loss and damage claims in a ratio out 



27 



28 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of all proportion to the increase in 
revenue. It is not intended to detain 
you by quoting statistics, yet a few 
definite statements will impress them 
more firmly on your memory. 

During the five calendar months 
ended May 31, 1917, the number of new 
loss and damage claims received was 
117,139, as compared with 60,886 for the 
same period of 1916, an increase of 
56,253 claims, or 92.39 per cent. 

The freight revenue for the same 
period in 1917, as compared with 1916, 
shows an increase of 10.42 per cent., 
indicating that the increase in the 
number of claims is greatly out of pro- 
portion to the increase in traffic. 

During this same period in 1917, as 
compared with 1916, payments account 
of loss and damage claims swelled from 
$361,782.47, to $656,907.04, an increase 
of $295,124.57, or 81.57 per cent. 

You will agree that these figures are 
appalling and that a remedy is necessary 
to cut out such a cancer on the revenue 
producing organs of our System. 

The increase in loss and damage is 
undoubtedly largely due to the labor 
conditions, particularly at important 
industrial centers, but it is also due to 
the larger proportion of L. C. L. traffic 
and to the increased value of consign- 
ments due to high costs. 

Mere rules and words will not prevent 
claims, but care and attention to rules 
will do it. We must meet conditions by 
an educational campaign which will 
educate the men now in the service and 
provide for the training of newcomers. 
Every man in the service should be on 
the lookout and use his best efforts to 
reduce loss and damage claims. While 
improved equipment has done much to 
lessen the possibility of damage to freight 
many elements of loss are still present. 

In addition to the increased cost of 
nearly all commodities and the labor con- 
ditions, then; are many other causes for 
increased payments account of loss and 
damage: Lack of interest by employes; 
lack of knowledge of the rules; failure 
fo comply with the rules when known; 
failure to check propert y before receipt- 
ing for ii ; receipting for property as in 
good order when it is in bad condition; 



receipting for more than is actually 
delivered; giving clean receipts for prop- 
erty loaded by shipper and not checked; 
mistakes in billing caused by failure to 
compare waybills with shipping instruc- 
tions; forwarding freight not marked 
with name of consignee and destination; 
improper loading, stowing and bracing 
freight; loading freight in dirty or leaky 
or otherwise unfit cars; failure to ice cars 
properly; improper use of air brakes; 
failure to report shortages, damages and 
overs promptly and properly; failure to 
give prompt notice of refused and un- 
claimed freight; failure to notify con- 
signees promptly and properly of the 
arrival of freight and to keep a record 
of such notice; delivering property to 
persons other than the consignee without 
proper order; failure to check freight 
properly w r hen delivered to consignee. 

There are many causes which make 
freight claims possible yet there is prob- 
ably no one present who cannot in some 
way help to stop the leak through claims. 

Each man in the organization must 
be trained and educated to the work he 
is called upon to do, and then he must 
be enthused with a purpose so that his 
efficiency may be brought up to its maxi- 
mum power. 

This has been done in other branches 
of railroading. Why not strive for a 
standardization of railroad practice that 
will make freight loss and damage claims 
impossible? 

Now what steps have we taken or- 
what steps do we expect to take to re- 
duce loss and damage claims to a mini- 
mum? 

On March 17 we issued revised in- 
structions to agents covering the hand- 
ling of freight reported, refused, un- 
claimed, short, over or astray. Here is 
an opportunity for the agent or freight 
house employe to work for numerous 
savings. 

Start your freight right and its de- 
livery is almost a certainty. Freight is 
half way there when properly marked, 
correctly billed and rightly loaded. 

We are issuing bulletins to agents and 
freight house employes covering definite 
instances of claims resulting from lax 
met hods. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



20 



We arc also running a series of bulle- 
tins in the Employes Magazine. Our 
endeavor is to inculcate a deeper sense 
of responsibility in the minds of the em- 
ployes. Our freight claim adjusters and 
inspectors travel over all divisions and 
make daily reports covering station con- 
ditions and freight handling on local 
freight trains. 

We are organizing claim prevention 
committees on each operating division. 
These committees- will meet regularly 
and discuss and install methods for bet- 
tering freight handling practice and re- 
ducing loss and damage claims. Ship- 
pers are being circularized and urged to 
cooperate with the railroads through the 
use of strongly constructed containers 
and proper methods of packing and 
marking freight. 

If we analyse claims we will find they 
are based on: Carelessness; laxity; in- 
difference; minimum interest and ship- 
shod methods. 

To kill claims let us substitute : Vigi- 
lance for carelessness; alertness for laxity; 
willingness for indifference; maximum 
efficiency for minimum interest and pro- 
ficiency for ship-shod methods. 

Then our problem will be on its way 
to solution. 



Fish Travel In Palace Car 

PipTlRESH fish from the Great Lakes 
[J J and the streams of the Lake 
country are assured eastern 
housewives by the arrangements 
just perfected by our road for shipping 
this valuable food from the west alive. 

A special baggage car, the first of its 
kind built for our road, has been placed 
in regular express service. It is equipped 
with a series of nine tanks and is fitted 
with a gas engine and two turbine pumps 
for supplying air to the fish. A special 
ice compartment has been provided, so 
that the water may be kept at the proper 
temperature en route. The car will be 
operated on a regular schedule between 
Chicago, Toledo, Cleveland and the 
Eastern markets. 



While this equipment is designed for 
commercial service exclusively, it could 
be used to advantage for the stocking of 
streams with game fish. It will be 
remembered that the black bass (which 
are now one of the things that make the 
Potomac River famous) were originally 
placed in the stream by a young Balti- 
more and Ohio engineer, who brought 
the fish from the Ohio River in the tender 
of his locomotive, shortly after the line 
was completed to Wheeling. 



Full Credit For Surplus 
Stationery 

|URING the month of July station- 
ery valued at $3,029.83 was 
returned to the stationer. The 
table below gives the comparative 
standing of the Divisions in this respect. 
You will note that the largest item is 
" Unknown" — stationery received with- 
out proper marking. If this material 
had been properly marked the Divisions 
sending it would have received credit. 
Division superintendents should be espe- 
cially interested in this matter, for the 
stationer allows full credit to the Division 
for all surplus stationery returned to 
him. 

Surplus stationery returned during 
July, 1917: 

Baltimore $ 556.46 

Indiana 264.51 

Pittsburgh 241.97 

Ohio 219.48 

Cumberland 164.74 

Illinois ... 132.92 

Monongah 131.75 

Connellsville 103.91 

Wheeling 53.13 

Chicago 44.80 

Newcastle 39.34 

Cleveland 39.28 

Newark 37.01 

Shenandoah 24.97 

Ohio River 3.32 

Philadelphia .87 

Unknown 971.37 

Total $3,829.83 



"Number 258 Step Up Front," 
Says Uncle Sam 



"Ready, Sir, and Willing, " Replies Thomas P. Clancy, First 
Baltimore and Ohio Man Selected for National Army 



President Willard: 

" Uncle Sam, I present Thomas P. 
Clancy, one of our young Baltimore and 
Ohio men from the office of district 
engineer Curtis, of Chicago. His number 
was 258 in the selective draft and he 
was the first Baltimore and Ohio man 
called to the colors. He is ready to 
respond and is a fine specimen of Amer- 
ican manhood. You need men of this 
young fellow's caliber to wage the war 
for democracy and, as he has proved 
himself a good railroad man , I am certain 
he will make a good soldier. We on the 
Baltimore and Ohio are proud of his 
patriotism and of the spirit with which 
he has answered your call." 

Thomas P. Clancy, American Citizen 
No. 258: 

" President Willard spoke for me when 
he told you that I'm ready, Uncle Sam, 
and I am. At this critical time in our 
country's history, when the effort of 
every whole-hearted man, woman and 
child in America is needed to perpetuate 
the principles of personal freedom, and 
as President Wilson has aptly put it, to 
make the world a fit place in which to 
live, 1 am prepared to render to my 
country the service which she has a l ight 
to expect." 

U ncle Sam : 

"That's ;i manly way to look at it, 
and, Mr. W illard, I will say to you and 
to tliis young man, Clancy, that America 
is proud of the industrial system which 
produces such young men and proud of 
the Baltimore and Ohio as a factor —and 
rightly it should he. In the days of '01 



your Company rendered most valuable 
service to the cause both in the handling 
of troops and in the casting of its lot 
with those who labored to preserve the 
Union of States. It rendered valuable 
service to the country long before the 
days of the Civil War, when it extended 
its highways of commerce into the 
undeveloped sections removed from the 
Atlantic Seaboard, thus contributing 
largely towards making the subsequent 
development of the nation a reality. It 
has been in the vanguard of progress 
ever since. Baltimore and Ohio men 
have always shown that they realize 
their duty to humanity and during these 
trying times, when it has become neces- 
sary to call to the defense of America a 
vast army of its young manhood, Thomas 
Clancys will find a place awaiting them 
in the history of this land of freedom." 

* * * * * 

If President Willard had met Thomas 
P. Clancy, of Chicago, in his office in 
Washington or Chicago on the afternoon 
of July 20, when the selective draft 
numbers were drawn, the foregoing 
imaginary conversation would certainly 
have taken place. The writer entered 
the office of district engineer Curtis a 
few minutes after the first number had 
been drawn. Mr. Curtis and young 
Clancy were planning to carry out the 
wishes of the young man t hat he enter the 
Army without delay. Plans for the 
future were being discussed in respect to 
undergoing the necessary examinations. 
Mr. Curtis was giving the young man 
just such advice as he would have given 
his son had he been in a similar situation. 



30 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



31 




THOMAS P. CLANCY 



"I am ready" was what Thomas Clancy 
told both Mr. Curtis and vice-president 
Batchelder and these officers were plan- 
ning to make the entry into the army as 
easy as possible. Both assured the young 
man that his position would be held open 
for him on furlough during the period of 
the war and they impressed upon him 
the honor attached to the step he was 
taking. 



In these days when real patriotism 
counts for so much in respect to the 
future of America and the perpetuation of 
the ideals of this nation of freemen, 
Thomas Clancy is a type of young man 
of whom any mother may well be proud 
and of whom any employer may well 
boast. Such a thought as "slacking" 
never entered his mind. He had de- 
termined upon his course in advance of 
the selective drawing and while his num- 
ber was within the capsule which Secretary 
of War Baker drew first, it is certain that 
Uncle Sam would have sooner or later 
numbered him among the recruits. 

Thomas Clancy's sister gave the Balti- 
more and Ohio men the best description 
of him when she told a newspaper man 
the afternoon of the drawing that "Tom 
is big and strong, he isn't afraid, he wants 
to go and he will make a good soldier." 
"Big and strong" describe him accu- 
rately, but sister Margaret omitted adding 
that he is an intelligent, energetic, self- 
improving, tenacious youth with deter- 
mination written all over his countenance. 
After completing his studies in prepara- 
tory schools in Chicago, Thomas finished 
the three-years' commercial course at 
De La Salle Institute and equipped 
himself to enter railroad service and 
win promotion through merit. While 
but twenty-one years of age, he has 
proven himself capable since entering 
the employ of assistant engineer Curtis, 
and Baltimore and Ohio men may well 
feel proud of their employe-comrade. 



/ 1™ ° ' D """""" a "' D """""" D ° ""' ' 10 D "" °" D """"""° ' ° "'° "'" D "" D "' ° " D "" ° D "" ° """ D ° ° ' Dl " "* ! 

1 1 Cooperation 

F^XO YOU stop to think how you can make it easier for the other man to 
j «L-^ intelligently comprehend and successfully accomplish his duty in the work 
1 in which you and he are jointly concerned? 

i 

Cooperation is assisting the responsible head of an organization to carry 

j out his plans. An effort to thwart or change those plans is interference. 

I Cooperation brings success. Interference brings losses :: :: :: :: 



The Esequiel Jewels 



By Arthur Walter Grahame 



HT nine o'clock one warm Saturday 
evening in August two men, a 
half emptied bottle of claret on 
the table between them, were 
seated in an obscure little table d'hote 
on a cross street, not so very far from 
Washington Square. 

Still unknown to the professional 
Bohemian, who is the curse of the more 
widely advertised restaurants of the 
neighborhood, Sezanne's is crowded each 
evening by regular patrons, who swear 
by the forty cent — with wine — dinner. 
Artists — the kind who really draw and 
paint — models, newspaper men and wom- 
en, and a sprinkling of clerks and stenog- 
raphers from the nearby business houses 
make up the crowd, with here and there 
a man or woman who even the initiated 
find it hard to accurately classify. 

One of the unwritten laws of the place 
is that if you are alone at a table and 
another person sits down there you must 
cDicr into conversation with the new- 
comer. It was in this way that Jack 
Martin, a clerk in the office of the World 
Insurance Company during the day and 
an art student in the evening, fell into 
talk with a well dressed Englishman, 
whose light hair and tawny mustache 
Contrasted strangely with a deeply 
1) ron zed, weather-beaten face. By the 
time a bottle of wine had been dis- 
patched the conversation had become 
animated. 

"By George, I envy you!" cried .lack, 
who hud been indulging rather more 
freely than the other. "I would give a, 
year of my life to have an adventure like 



any one of a dozen you have told me 
about. But what chance have I, shut 
up in an office all day, of adventure? 
The same old thing, day after day, week 
after week and month after month! 
The office all day, with Old Man Smith 
(he is the chief clerk, you know) on my 
back most of the time, then art school at 
night. When I get up in the morning 
I know exactly how I am going to spend 
every hour until I go to bed again at 
night. What I want is excitement, 
adventure — some of the spice of life. I 
would do anything in the world to get 
away from this awful grind!" 

" Adventures, they say, are for the 
adventurous," replied the Englishman, 
smiling at Jack's enthusiasm. 

" Oh, its all very well for you, who have 
spent the last ten years in Central 
America, where things happen, to say 
that. There are no adventures in New 
York." 

"I can't agree with you there," said 
the other, shaking his head. 

"Well," cried Jack, "my vacation 
started today and I am my own master 
for two weeks. Can you suggest a single 
adventurous way of spending that time?" 

The other man sat in thought for a 
minute or so. 

"You say that there are no adventures 
in New York," he said at length. " I 
will prove to you that there are. 

"At this moment I have in an inner 
pocket a box containing the Esequiel 
jewels. I don't suppose that you have 

ever heard of them, but I hey were the 

most famous gems in all Sout h America. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



33 



I can not tell you how I came by them, 
except that they were given me as a 
reward for services 1 rendered the 
president of a ( Jentral American republic. 
They are honestly mine, but I couldn't 
prove it in court. At any rate, there are 



people on my track who arc determined 
to get these jewels away from me— and 
they will stop at nothing. Tomorrow 
morning 1 am leaving the city, in an 
effort to escape them. But I am pretty 
certain that they will follow me. 




"JACK LIKED THE PROSPECT OF ADVENTURE 



34 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



"Now, if you mean what you say 
about wanting an adventure, I will take 
you with me as a sort of bodyguard. 
They are less likely to attempt violence 
if I have someone constantly with me. 
The conditions of my offer are that you 
ask no questions and implicitly obey my 
orders. Two weeks from tomorrow night 
you will be back in New York, and I 
will pay yo*u five hundred dollars for your 
trouble and risk. What do you say?" 

Jack liked the mystery and the pros- 
pect of adventure, and the five hundred 
dollars would be very acceptable. But, 
on the other hand, it seemed more than 
probable that the fellow was a swindler, 
and that he might get into a very nasty 
fix by becoming involved with him. 
Like most honest citizens he was fearful, 
above everything else, of becoming en- 
tangled in the meshes of the law. After 
a moment's thought he decided to refuse 
the offer. 

"I'm sorry," he began, "but — " 

"Ah, you see that it is as I said," 
interrupted the other, pushing back his 
chair. "Adventures are for the adven- 
turous. If you are afraid to accept a 
chance when one comes to you — " 

"I'm not afraid," cried Jack, stung by 
1 i 1 i s reflection on his courage. "I'm 
your man, on this condition — if you ask 
me to do anything that I consider wrong 
J reserve the right to withdraw, and you 
pay me nothing." 

"Agreed," said the other, and they 
shook hands on the bargain. 

"Now, what are your orders?" asked 
Jack. 

The Englishman drew a well filled 
wallet from his pocket and counted out 
five twenty dollar notes. 

"Here is an earnest on the five hun- 
dred," he remarked, pushing the money 
across the table. "Meet me at the 
corner of West and Cedar Streets at ten 
minutes before eleven tomorrow morning. 
Pack your bag for a two weeks' stay at 
the seashore." 

"Why man, you don't even know my 
name!" exclaimed Jack. "How do you 
know that I won't take your hundred 
dollars and never show up again?" 

"I'm a pretty good judge of faces," 
replied the Englishman, with a smile. 



"But, by the way, what is your 
name?" 

' ! Martin, ' ' replied Jack. 1 1 And you i s ? ' 1 
"Beck," answered the other, as he 
arose. "I was once a captain in the 
British army. That's a long time back. 
Well, I'll see you at West and Cedar 
tomorrow morning at ten minutes be- 
fore eleven. Be on time, please. Good 
night." 

Captain Beck lighted a fresh cigar, 
glanced keenly around the room and 
sauntered out. 

II 

When Jack awoke the next morning 
he had to feel in his pocket for the five 
twenty dollar bills to assure himself that 
the affair of the previous night had not 
been a dream. Then, as he remembered 
the details of his conversation with Cap- 
tain Beck, doubts began to assail his 
mind. Many projects that seem easy 
of accomplishment while being discussed 
at a restaurant table in the evening 
assume a quite different hue when 
reviewed with sober afterthought in the 
early morning. The more he thought 
of the proposition that the captain had 
made to him the less he liked it. 

"I'm sorry that I ever got mixed up in 
the business," he growled. "This fellow 
Beck may be all right, but I very much 
doubt it. He may be a crook dodging 
the police and he may be a gentlemanly 
confidence man or a counterfeiter who 
needs someone to help him pass bad 
bills. If he is a crook of any sort I 
suppose that he wants me to hold the 
bag and be the goat. By George, I 
won't have anything more to do with 
him! I'll meet him, return his money 
and tell him that the bargain is off. 
The office is bad enough — I don't want 
to spend a year or two in jail. I suppose 
that I may as well pack my bag and gel 
out of town this morning anyhow. I'll de- 
cide where to go on my way down town." 

He glanced at his watch and found 
that it was half-past nine. Informing his 
landlady that he would be away for two 
weeks he hurried to a nearby small 

restaurant and made a hasty breakfast. 
Then jumping on an open Broadway ••.•it- 
he started down town. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



35 



If Jack had taken any but the Broad- 
way car he would, in all probability, 
still be a clerk in the office of the World 
Insurance Company. As it was, he had 
to pass the imposing building of that 
institution and the sight of this edifice, 
to him an absolute prison, turned his 
thoughts into a new channel. 

"Two weeks of freedom," he thought 
as he scowled at the building, "and then 
back to the grind for another year. It's 
disgusting. Old Man Smith will find 
that error I made and forgot to correct 
last week and will get after me good and 
strong when I get back. I shouldn't 
be at all surprised if he fired me. I 
think that I'll see this affair with Beck 
through, after all. I can always drop 
out if I want to, and five hundred 
dollars is a nice little pot of money. 
With it I could tell old Smith to go to the 
devil, and look around for something 
that would suit me better than stooping 
over a ledger all day. By George, I'll 
do it!" 

As he made this resolution the car 
reached Cedar Street. Jack jumped off 
and hurried toward the river. It was a 
quarter before eleven when he reached 
West Street. There he waited for a few 
minutes, without seeing anything of 
Beck. Just as he was getting anxious a 
taxi drew up at the curb and a hand at 
the window beckoned him to enter. 
There he found Captain Beck, immacu- 
late in a gray flannel suit, surrounded by 
luggage and leaning well back from the 
window. 

"Glad you're on time," said the 
captain, extending his hand. "I think 
that I have thrown them off my track 
this time, but you can never be sure. 
That is why I didn't show my face at 
the window. Sandy Hook Line pier, 
driver." 

"Where are we going?" asked Jack, 
forgetting that he had agreed to ask no 
questions. 

" Asbury Park," replied Beck. " Queer 
place for anything in the adventure way, 
isn't it? Get the tickets, won't you?" 
he added, passing Jack a bill. "I don't 
want to show myself until we are ready 
to go OM hoard the boat." 

There were several people waiting to 



buy tickets and as Jack took his place 
another man stepped into line behind 
him. A few moments later, as he was 
turning away from the window with the 
tickets and change in his hand, this man 
stumbled, knocking against his arm and 
causing him to drop one of the tickets. 
The awkward man stooped quickly and 
picked it up, returning it with a bow and 
a few courteous words of apology, 
spoken in careful English, but with a 
slight foreign accent. Jack glanced at 
him curiously and saw that he was a 
short, dark fellow of middle age, who wore 
a pointed beard and long, heavy mus- 
tache, and who smiled in a quick, 
nervous way. As he stepped away from 
the window he heard him ask for a ticket 
to Asbury Park. 

Captain Beck and Jack sat in the cab 
until the boat arrived. Then, followed 
by a couple of porters with the bags, they 
hurried down the long pier. As they 
passed up the gang-plank Jack noticed 
that the bearded man was standing near 
the rail, idly scanning the passengers as 
they came aboard. 

Beck said nothing until they were 
seated on the upper deck, near the stern 
of the boat. 

"They are after me again," he then 
announced in his usual off-hand manner. 
" I thought that I had thrown them off the 
track, but in some way they have 
managed to pick it up." 

"How do you know?" asked Jack, who 
was becoming more and more interested 
in Captain Beck and his fortunes. 

"Did you happen to notice a short, 
dark fellow, with a beard, standing at the 
rail when we came aboard? Well, he's 
the most dangerous of the lot. He is a 
mild enough looking chap, but I'll wager 
anything you like that there is a Toledo 
blade in that bamboo stick of his and, 
from all that I've heard of him, he is just 
the man to use it, should he think it 
expedient." 

"The same fellow who stumbled against 
me when I bought the tickets!" ex- 
claimed Jack. " He knocked one of them 
out of my hand and when he picked it 
up I suppose he saw what station it was 
for — he bought one to the same place. 
( Jah't you go to some other resort?" 



36 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



" That's the deuce of it," replied the 
Captain. "I can't change now — it's too 
late. But, thank the Lord, there is 
still a chance to jockey the devil." 

On the trip down the Bay Beck was 
quite as interesting as he had been in 
Sezanne's the night before. For ten 
years, as a miner, adventurer and soldier 
of fortune he had wandered up and down 
and across South and Central America. 
Everywhere he had found adventure 
and, in his cool, off-hand manner, told 
of wild scenes and wilder deeds in so 
convincing a way as to make his hearer 
long for the same free, un trammeled 
existence. But of his life before leaving 
England, and of his reasons for taking to 
the "out trail" he said not a word. 
The captain also drew out his com- 
panion and Jack told him of his artistic 
ambitions and waxed eloquent on the 
subject of his hatred of the office. 

When he had finished, Beck sat in 
silence for a few minutes, then seemed 
to come to a sudden decision. 

"Martin," he said, "I have decided to 
trust you all the way and I am going to 
tell you a little about the queer business 
in which I am now engaged. Then, if 
you want to, you can drop out, or, if you 
are willing to take the chances and stand 
by me for the next two weeks, I'll pay 
you enough to give you a couple of years 
in Paris. 

"I can't tell you the whole story, for 
there is a lady, very highly placed in her 
own country, implicated in it. 

"You no doubt remember that I said 
that the president of a Central American 
republic gave me the famous Esequiel 
jewels as a reward for services that I 
had been able to render him. 

"While this man was president I was 
in command of his body guard. There 
was a revolution and the president and 
moei of the other members of the govern- 
ment had to skip. In a way that I can 
not explain to you there came into my 
hands a packet containing these jewels. 
[ turned 1 hem over to the president, I ml he 
handed them back to me. You see, 1 here 
had been a pretty si iff fight and, although 
I had been wounded rather badly, I had 
helped him to escape. Naturally, being 
a soldier of fortune, I accepted (hem. 



"Now, although I have a moral right 
to the jewels I have no legal right to 
them, for, as there had been a pro- 
visional president appointed, and the 
jewels were originally government pro- 
perty, the president had no right to give 
them to me. But, as I suppose you have 
heard, it is the custom in Central America 
for a deposed president to take with 
him all the valuables that he can lay 
hands on. 

"The people who are after these 
jewels are the ones who engineered the 
revolution. They are members of what 
is now the government of the republic 
and should I attempt to leave the 
United States they would at once have 
me arrested. Every ship that sails is 
watched by their agents, and you know 
how closely they follow me. The man 
who is on the boat with us is Rojas, the 
chief of their secret police. 

"However, because of certain political 
and personal considerations, they would 
rather not bring the law into the 
matter, and, so long as I do not at- 
tempt to leave the country, they will 
confine themselves to trying to get the 
gems through the efforts of their agents. 
My one chance is to slip away un- 
noticed, and, to attempt that, I have 
arranged for a schooner, the master of 
which is under great obligations to me 
and who I am sure that I can trust, to 
send a boat ashore on the Jersey coast 
and to take me off. Once at sea I can 
lose them long enough to dispose of the 
jewels. But to be on the safe side I had 
to allow the master of the schooner 
plenty of time and the date set is almost 
two weeks off. Those two weeks will be 
the dangerous time. 

"If you decide to stay with me and 
help me make my escape it is very 
probable, in fact almost certain, that 
you too will be in very serious danger. 
The people who are after the Esequiel 
jewels will stop at nothing — not even 
murder — to get them. 

"On the other hand, should we get 
through all right I will hand you a check 
for two thousand dollars. 

" Now Martin* you must decide Are 
you willing to risk your life for two 
thousand dollars?" 



"DON'T LOOK BACK," BECK CAUTIONED, "HE IS FOLLOWING US" 



38 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



"You bet!" exclaimed Jack. "I've 
always wanted to have an adventure 
and this is a real one." 

Beck drew a small oblong box, wrapped 
in brown paper, from an inner pocket. 
After glancing around to make sure that 
they were not watched, he handed it to 
Jack. 

"This is what they are after," he said. 
"You can never tell what trick they will 
try and by this time Rojas knows that I 
had the box with me when I left New 
York. Put it in an inside pocket. 
Well, here we are at the Highlands." 

Ill 

That afternoon Captain Beck and Jack 
were comfortably installed in one of the 
resort's largest and best hotels. Beck 
selected a large, pleasant room over- 
looking the boardwalk and ocean and 
containing two beds. 

As soon as the bellboy left them Beck 
opened one of his bags and produced 
two automatic pistols. 

"One of these is for you," he said. "I 
will show you how it works and you must 
always carry it. Remember, if we are 
attacked it may mean either your or 
the other fellow's life, so don't hesitate 
about shooting first. We have the law 
on our side." 

"I wonder what has happened to 
Rojas?" remarked Jack." "We haven't 
seen him since we went aboard the boat." 

"In all probability he is in this very 
hotel/' answered Beck. 

This supposition proved to be correct. 
As Jack and the captain were leaving the 
dining room after dinner that evening 
they saw the South American seated at a 
table near the entrance. Turning sud- 
denly a moment later Beck saw him rise 
and follow them. 

"Don't look back," he cautioned as 
they strolled along the Boardwalk. "He 
is following us, but I would rather that 
he did qo1 know I ha1 we know it." 

Alter a half hour's stroll they entered 
an unoccupied summer house that pro- 
jected out over the water. A few min- 
utes later Rojas stood bowing in the door 
wsy. „ 

"Senor Beck?" he inquired, with his 



odd smile. Beck showed no sign of 
surprise. "Yes," he answered. "Won't 
you be seated?" Rojas declined with a 
gesture and started to speak rapiflly in 
Spanish, but Beck interrupted with an 
upraised hand. 

"If you have anything to say to me, 
Senor Rojas," he said, "I must ask that 
you speak in English. Mr. Martin does 
not understand Spanish and, in the matter 
that you are going to speak about, what 
concerns me concerns him." 

Rojas, perhaps surprised to find that 
Beck knew him, hesitated a moment, 
then began again, this time in English. 

"Senor Beck," he said, "I will be 
frank and open with you. I place my 
cards face upward on the table. You 
have the Esequiel jewels. You got them 
honestly, I know, inasmuch as the 
former president gave them to you as a 
reward for your faithful services. You 
see that I am well informed on all points. 
But at that time he was no longer 
president and, as the jewels were govern- 
ment property, you have no legal right 
to them. Therefore, we can regain them 
by seeking the help of the police." 

"If that is the case," asked Beck, 
"why don't you have me arrested as a 
thief? Prove that what you say is true 
and the American authorities will return 
the jewels to your government." 

"Ah, senor, you are clever," returned 
Rojas, smiling broadly. "As I said, I 
play with my cards face upward on the 
table. For various reasons, which you 
understand as well as I do, we, like you, 
are not anxious to appeal to the law. 
Senor Beck, here is the proposal that I 
am authorized to make to you. Give 
me the jewels and I will pay you twenty- 
five thousand dollars in American 
money." 

"No," said Beck shortly. 

"Then, senor, we will take the jewels," 
replied Rojas, still smiling. "And, al- 
though it would give me great pain, we 
will perhaps be compelled to take your 
life, too. I know that you are a brave 
and clever man, but you cannot escape 
us. ( 'hoose, senor, twenty-five thousand 
dollars or death !" 

"I'll keep both I he jewels and niv lite," 

answered Beck, coolly. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



39 



"I am sorry," said the Spaniard, 
rising. Then a sudden change came over 
his face and he leaned intently for- 
ward. 

"But, senor, we already have the 
jewels!" he cried, triumphantly. 

Captain Beck smiled and puffed placid- 
ly on his cigar, but Jack, startled, placed 
his hand over the pocket in which he 
carried the box to assure himself that it 
was still there. 

"That is, we are sure of getting them," 
added Rojas, who had not failed to 
notice Jack's movement. "Good-night, 
senor s." 

Beck, smiling, watched him until he 
disappeared in the crowd on the board- 
walk. 

"That little farce was staged to find 
which, if either, of us had the box with 
him," he said. "My dear fellow, you 
shouldn't have let him get a rise out of 
you like that. Come, we must get to 
our room and hide the box." 

"What a fool I was," groaned Jack. 

"Not a bit of it, old top," answered 
Beck, giving him a friendly slap on the 
shoulder. "You need experience, that 
is all. I don't think that they will dare 
attempt anything on our way to the 
hotel, but keep your pistol handy." 

When they reached the hotel the or- 
chestra was playing and many were 
dancing. In the corridor a group of 
fifteen or twenty people were gathered 
about the ball room door. Beck, a few 
steps in advance, made his way through 
without mishap, but Jack had the mis- 
fortune to collide with a stout gentleman, 
who turned upon him an angry counte- 
nance. By the time he had finished his 
apology Beck was out of sight. 

Just as Jack was turning away from 
the still indignant stout man a tall,, 
beautifully gowned woman who was 
standing, apparently alone, a few steps 
away, suddenly reeled and would have 
fallen had Jack not caught her in his 
arms. She rested there a few moments, 
seemingly almost fainting, then, before 
more than a few bystanders had noticed 
the incident, recovered herself and with a 
murmured word of thanks entered the 
ball room. 

Jack hurried after Beck, catching sight 



of him just as he was entering their 
room. Just before reaching the door 
he mechanically felt for the box contain- 
ing the jewels and found to his horror 
that there was a long clean cut in his 
coat and that the box was gone. For a 
moment his heart stopped beating, then 
he rushed to the room. 

"Beck," he gasped, "I've been robbed 
of the box!" 

"Where? When?" cried Beck. 

"I don't know. Yes, I do, too. 
That woman — " 

"Come, come, brace up!" ordered 
Beck crisply. "What woman? Tell me 
about it." 

"A woman, apparently almost fainting, 
fell against me in the corridor. Natur- 
ally, I caught her in my arms. A few 
seconds later she seemed to recover and 
entered the ball room. A moment ago 
I felt for the box and found that my 
coat had been cut open and the jewels 
taken." 

Beck was silent for a moment, his 
face stern. Then he started for the 
door. 

"Go to the office and wait for me 
there," he ordered, over his shoulder. 
"I must find Rojas. Wait until I come, 
no matter how long I may be." 

In the office Jack waited for almost 
half an hour. Then Rojas came in and 
stepped up to the desk, where the 
manager was standing. Jack, leaning 
against the cigar case, could hear the 
conversation. 

"I am about to make a rather unusual 
request," Rojas began. "I have here a 
very valuable package, which I want to 
put in a safe place. I see that you have 
two safes in your office and wish to hire 
one for my private use. May I do 
so?" 

"Why, yes," replied the manager. 
"The smaller safe is not in use, so I see 
no objection to you taking it." 

"I thank you," said Rojas, drawing 
the paper wrapped box that contained 
the Esequiel jewels from his pocket. 
"I will place this package in it at 
once." 

The manager opened the safe and 
Rojas placed the package inside. Then, 
with his back toward Jack, he turned the 



40 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



combination. Going to the desk he 
wrote something on a sheet of paper, 
took an addressed envelope from his 
pocket, placed the paper in it and 
dropped it in the mail slot. On his way 
out he stopped at the cigar counter. 

"So, Senor Martin," he remarked with 
his sneering' smile, and turned away. 

At this moment Beck, who had been 
searching all over the hotel for Rojas, 
entered the office. He walked straight 
up to the smiling Spaniard. 

" Rojas," he said in a low and per- 
fectly even voice, " you've got the jewels, 
but I'll have them back! If you attempt 
to leave Asbury Park before I give you 
leave, I shall shoot you. You may 
have heard that I am a man of my 
word." 

U I assure you that I have not the 
slightest intention of leaving here before 
you do," replied Rojas. " Senor Martin 
can tell you that I have just made an 
important deposit in that safe." 

Beck, without answering, turned on 
his heel and motioning to Jack to follow, 
left the office. Jack glanced swiftly 
around the room. Rojas was at the 
door, his eyes following Beck down the 
corridor. The manager and the clerk 
were engaged in conversation near a 
window. Leaning over the desk a mo- 
ment, as if writing, he tore off the corner 
of the blotter— an almost new one — 
and quietly went out. 

Beck held out his hand to Jack when 
he joined him in their room. 

" Don't be downhearted, old chap," 
he said. "I might have been taken in 
by the same trick." 

Jack gratefully grasped the extended 
hand. 

" Beck, I can't tell you how badly I 
feel about this," he said earnestly. "I 
can say only one thing — that there is no 
risk that I will not run to help you 
recover the jewels and to make your 
escape." 

"It will be a lough job, but I'm going 
to have a try at it," replied Beck. "But 
what the deuce did Rojas mean when he 
said thai he had just deposited something 
in the safe?" 

Jack told him what he had seen and 
heard in I he office. 



"You see the cleverness of the trick 
of placing the package in the hotel safe." 
said Beck thoughtfully. "The moment 
we attempt to recover it, we leave our- 
selves open to arrest as burglars, not 
upon his complaint, but upon that of 
the hotel people. He will see to it that 
the safe is well watched." 

"Here is a piece of the blotting paper 
with which he blotted the letter he sent 
off in the mail," suggested Jack. "I 
have heard of reading what has been 
written by holding the blotter before a 
mirror. Let's try it." 

"Good!" exclaimed Beck. "It may 
give us a clue." 

Jack held the piece of blotter before 
the glass and what were unintelligible 
marks on the paper resolved themselves 
into plain letters and figures in the 
mirror. 

"Start at 5— right to 40— left to 8— 
right to 58," they read. 

"It's the combination of the safe!" 
exclaimed Beck. 

"Then why the deuce did he send it 
away in a letter?" asked Jack. 

"I have it," said the captain, after a 
few moments thought. "They know 
that we can not touch the jewels as long 
as they are in the safe. Rojas intends 
to watch me as long as I remain here and 
follow me when I leave. He has sent 
the combination to someone else — it's 
in English, you notice — who will come 
and recover the box when I am out of 
the way." 

Captain Beck stood in silence for a 
few moments, staring out over the ocean. 
Then he turned to Jack. 

"Martin," he said, "I am going to 
have those jewels back if I have to blow 
the safe to get them! I've wandered 
about for a good many years and seen 
good times and bad, but this is the first 
good pot that I've ever won, and I'm 
not going to be robbed of it. I may get 
caught and go to jail, and I don't want 
to let you in for that. So — " 

"I lost the jewels for you," inter- 
rupted .lack, "and I'm going to help 
you get them back. Make whatever 
plans you think best — I'm with you all 
the way." 

(To be concluded in the next number) 



Accident Prevention 



By John A. Rupp 

File Clerk, Office of General Auditor 
(Prize Article on Accident Prevention) 



^ONCE read a convincing allegory 
upon human life, written by 
bvexM Addison, entitled: "The Vision 
BaSs I of Mirzah." It relates how 
Mirzah had ascended the hills of Bagdad, 
intending to spend a day in quiet medita- 
tion. As he sat there he heard a sound 
like sweet music, and on looking up his 
attention was diverted to a genius clad 
in shepherd's garments, who beckoned to 
him, saying: "I have heard thy musings 
on the life of man." The genius then 
bade Mirzah to look eastward. Upon 
doing so, he beheld a great valley, with 
a foaming tide rushing through it. A 
bridge, composed of three-score-and-ten 
arches, which, added to some broken ones 
near the one end, made up the number to 
nearly one hundred, spanned the valley. 
At either end was a thick mist. Mirzah 
turned in bewilderment to the genius, 
inquiring what it meant. The genius 
told him that the mist was the "mist of 
eternity," and the bridge, "the bridge 
of life." Mirzah noticed many people 
passing over the bridge and there were 
many trap-doors in it, more numerous 
at the ends than in the middle. The 
trap-doors opened as they were stepped 
upon and let the people fall through into 
the gushing tide beneath, which bore the 
unfortunate ones quickly away into the 
mists. Mirzah saw some of the people 
pushing others cn trap-doors that they 
otherwise would not have trodden on. 
Many others were busy pursuing bubbles 
which broke almost as soon as grasped. 
Mirzah also discerned, in the vision that 



very few people got past the middle of 
the bridge. Some did manage to keep 
up a kind of limping march through the 
broken arches; however, these looked 
exhausted from their fatiguing walk. 

This allegory is indeed true. We all 
pass over the "bridge of life" to the 
"mists of eternity." The trap-doors, 
as applied to railroad life, are the dan- 
gerous risks taken by many, which 
result in disaster. It is certainly de- 
plorable that very few people who are 
born into the world live past middle life. 
But how sad is it for others, "pushed 
through the trap-doors" of life by their 
fellow employes, who indulge in unsafe 
methods, leading to their downfall. It 
is distressing enough that many sacred 
lives are sacrificed in battle, or starved 
by the greediness of others. 

The bubbles which many chase are 
riches and pleasure. But if one has not 
straight limbs and good health to enjoy 
these gifts of what value are they? 
Unsafe habits are the danger signals to 
"Stop! Look! and Listen!" It is then 
time to correct our methods. As it is 
poor policy for an engineer to wait until 
his engine breaks down before he repairs 
it, so also it is unwise for anyone to be 
habitually careless at his daily employ- 
ment until an accident befalls him. 
When life is extinct, it is too late. 

Having developed our bodies to their 
fullest possibility of physical and mental 
culture, through the aid of our Welfare 
Bureau, we should give careful attention 
to the treatise on accident prevention, 



41 



42 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




and as members of the large Baltimore 
and Ohio family lend hearty cooperation 
to safety plans for the future, which will 
be further conducive to our happiness 
and contentment, individually as well as 
collectively. 




JOHN A. RUPP 



The Prize Winner a 
Baltimore Boy 

|OHN A. RUPP, the winner of the 
prize offered by the management 
for the best essay on "Accident 
Prevention," was born in Balti- 
more, Md., on October 14, 1894. He 
was educated in St. James' School and 
Sadler's Business College and entered 
the service of the Company on April 4, 
1911, as a clerk in the office of the auditor 
of disbursements. About a year later 
he was transferred to the office of the 
general auditor, where he now holds the 
position of file clerk. 



— £ 

<+ 

I 

i 



Forget It 

i 

If you see a tall fellow ahead of a crowd, 
A leader of men, marching fearless and proud, 
And you know of a tale whose mere telling aloud, 
Would cause his proud head to in anguish be bowed, 
It's a pretty good plan to forget it. 

| 

If you know of a skeleton hidden away 
In a closet, and guarded and kept from the day 
In the dark; and whose showing, whose sudden display, 
Would cause grief and sorrow and life-long dismay, 
It's a pretty good plan to forget it. 

§ 

If you know of a thing that will darken the joy 
Of a man or a woman, a girl or a boy, 
That will wipe out a smile, or the least way annoy 
A fellow, or cause any gladness to cloy, 

It's a pretty good plan to forget it. Ford Times. 



The Evolution of the Relief Department 



By William H. Ball 

Secretary to Superintendent Relief Department 



HVERY machine, edifice or insti- 
tution designed by man for his 
use, convenience or comfort has 
its inception in an idea born in 
the mind of 'some dreamer. 

In the beginning this idea is usually 
enveloped in a murky haze of doubt, 
speculation and conjecture, which fre- 
quently almost obliterates every trace 
of it. By degrees, however, the funda- 
mental idea emerges, stands out in bold 
relief from the original encumbrances, 
and is embodied in some substantial plan 
which eventually operates for the benefit 
of mankind. 

No dreamer is exempt from the ridicule 
and criticism of people who claim the 
distinction of being practical men. 
Every suggestion of a departure from the 
established order is vigorously attacked 
on all sides by the conservative, and the 
idealist is told that his dreams are in- 
capable of realization. 

It seems almost, paradoxical to say 
that dreamers or idealists are usually 
the most practical men, with an un- 
faltering determination to carry out to a 
logical conclusion the idea which had its 
birth in their dreams. To men of this 
type, the race owes much for its progress 
onward and upward, although few of 
them have ever had the satisfaction of 
living until there was general recognition 
of their contribution toward the sum of 
human happiness. 

The Relief Department of the Balti- 
more and Ohio Railroad has been in 
successful operation for thirty-seven 
years. It had been in existence for many 



years when most of the present employes 
of the Company first entered the service. 
We therefore accepted the institution as 
part and parcel of the general scheme, 
and appropriated the benefits flowing 
from its activities with the haughty in- 
difference of an Oriental potentate receiv- 
ing tribute from his subjects: it was ours 
by right, so why should we inquire how, 
why and when the plan was inaugurated. 
But, this well-organized and evenly 
balanced adjunct of the corporation 
originally existed as an idea, an indefinite 
dream. The hard-headed conservatives 
predicted that a plan providing relief for 
the disabled employe and the dependents 
of those who died would inevitably fail, 
particularly because it involved joint 
contributions and administration by the 
employes and the management. As 
usual, opposition merely served as a 
stimulus for those who were behind the 
movement, and thirty-seven years suc- 
cessful operation certainly demonstrates 
the fact that these men knew what they 
were seeking to accomplish, even though 
they were ridiculed as dreamers and 
idealists. 

The most extravagant dreams of the 
founders of our Relief Department did 
not contemplate the growth of the 
institution to its present proportions. 
Their original idea was to provide or- 
ganized aid for disabled employes and 
their dependents, to take the place of 
the irregular and illogical practices which 
prevailed theretofore. The plan inaug- 
urated was so successful that it has 
served as a model for hundreds of similar 



43 



44 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



institutions that other companies have 
inaugurated since that time. We are 
justly proud of this distinction as a 
pioneer in welfare work, particularly 
because if proved that there was a com- 
munity of interest between employer 
and employe, encouraging and pro- 
moting that loyalty and spirit of the corps 
which are such valuable assets to an 
enterprise. 

As a logical sequence to the original 
plan of relief, there followed first the 
Company's Pension System, providing 
allowances from a fund contributed by 
the Company alone, to employes becom- 



ing incapacitated by age or disease after 
long and faithful service; and, later, the 
establishment of a Savings Fund provid- 
ing a convenient place of deposit, on 
interest, of employe's savings, with 
opportunity to employes to borrow the 
money so deposited, in order to purchase 
or build homes. 

To most of the Company's employes 
these activities of the several features of 
the Relief Department are well known. 
If more detailed information is desired, 
the management will be pleased to answer 
all inquiries, either directly or through 
the medium of our Magazine. 



Twenty-Eighth Annual Meeting of Baltimore 
and Ohio Association of Railway 
Surgeons Held in Cleveland 



HE Twenty-eighth Annual Meet- 
ing of the Baltimore and Ohio 
Association of Railway Surgeons 
was held in Cleveland, Ohio, 
June 20 to 22 inclusive. The convention 
was well attended and all the medical 
men present report a most enjoyable 
and profitable time. 

The membership of the Association is 
composed of surgeons connected with 
our railroad, and it has for its object 
the promotion of matters relating to the 
highly specialized work of the railroad 
surgeon. Conventions at which sub- 
jects of interest to the profession are 
discussed and addresses made by some 
of the tnosl prominenl medical men of 
the country, are held annually in the 
various cities on our- System. 

The opening session was held on the 
morning of June 20. The Reverend 
Andrew B. Meldron pronounced the 
invocation, and addresses of welcome 
were delivered by Hon. II. L. Davis, 



Mayor of Cleveland, in behalf of the city, 
by Dr. Ralph K. UpdegrafT, the presi- 
dent of the Cleveland Academy of Medi- 
cine, on behalf of the medical profession 
of Cleveland and by M. G. Carrel, our 
district passenger agent - at Cleveland, on 
behalf of the Company. Dr. John W.- 
Hays, the president of the Association, 
responded, and was followed by S. H. 
Tolles, our counsel at Cleveland, who 
delivered an interesting address. 

Dr. E. M. Parlett, chief of our Welfare 
Bureau, then delivered an address on 
"The Welfare and Health of Railway 
Employes." Lack of space makes it 
impossible to publish this important and 
most interesting address in this issue of 
the Magazine, but it is hoped that it will 
be possible to publish it in full in the 
near future. 

Dr. Parlett was followed by Dr. W. C. 
Rucker, assistant surgeon, U. S. Public 
Health Service, who spoke on "Epide- 
miology of Disease," and by Dr. Lydon 




THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



45 



Holt Landon, assistant to the chief sur- 
geon of the Carnegie Steel Co., of Pitts- 
burgh, who gave a most interesting 
illustrated talk on the Carel-Deakin 
method of treating wounds and the 
Ambrin treatment of burns. His talk 
was illustrated by lantern slides of treat- 
ment of the terrible wounds caused by 
shrapnel and liquid fire in the Great 
War. 

Other addresses at this session were: 
"The Matter of Temperament and 
Disease/' Dr. Theodore Diller, of Pitts- 
burgh, Pa.; "The Use of Atropine Com- 
bined with Dionin and Cocaine, in treat- 
ment of Eye Injuries," Dr. Frederick S. 
Baron, P. A. C. S., of Zanesville, Ohio; 
"The Non-surgical Treatment of Ocular 
Traumatism/' Dr. R. C. Heflebower, of 
Cincinnati; "Traumatic Synovitis," Dr. 
A. L. Grubb, of Berkeley Springs, W. Va., 
and "A Surgeon's Experience on a Trip 
Around the World," Dr. James Cooper, 
of Baltimore. 

"All work and no play makes Jack 
a dull boy," so the members were enter- 
tained at a theatre party at the Stillman 
Theatre in the afternoon and a cabaret 
dinner at the Hotel Statler in the 
evening. 

At the session on June 21 the following 
addresses were delivered: "Bone Trans- 
plantation," Dr. H. H. Haynes, of 
Clarksburg, W. Va.; "Fractures," Dr. 



H. A. Becker, of Cleveland; "Operative 
Treatment of Fractures" (illustrated), 
Dr. Walter L. Griess, consulting surgeon, 
of Cincinnati; "Injuries of the Spine," 
Dr. Charles F. Bowen, of Columbus, 
Ohio; "Report of an interesting case in 
its relation to so-called traumatic Hernia" 
Dr. C. R. G. Forrester, consulting sur- 
geon, Chicago; "Abdominal Injuries with 
and without External Evidence," Dr. C. 
E. Shilling, of Canton, Ohio; "Injuries 
to Abdomen and Pelvis/' Dr. J. W. 
McDonald, of Fairmont, W. Va.; "In- 
juries to the Liver from External Vio- 
lence," Dr. John W. Thomson, of 
Garrett, Ind., and " Cholecytostomy 
versus Cholecystectomy," Dr. E. J. 
Weber, of Olney, 111. 

The entertainment for this day con- 
sisted of a sight-seeing automobile trip 
to interesting places in Cleveland. 

The last day of the convention was 
spent in an all-day boat trip to Put-In- 
Bay. A business meeting was held on 
the boat, at which the following officers 
were elected : 

President, Dr. W. F. Morrison, of 
Philadelphia; first vice-president, Dr. E. 
B. Fittro; second vice-president, Dr. J. 
G. Shirer, of Newark, Ohio; secretary- 
treasurer, Mr. C. E. Johnson of Baltimore 
(re-elected) . 

The 1918 convention of the Association 
will be held, in Baltimore. 



) ! Note These Increases in Iron and Steel Prices ! 

n 

?! 

u 
u 
n 
n 

i 
1 
I 

1 

| 

1 

| Structural Beams, Pittsburgh, 100 pounds 4.00 1.20 233.3 

1 





May 30, 


July 3, 


Per Cent. 






1917 


1914 


Increase 


g 


Foundry, No. 2, Philadelphia, ton 


$45.50 


$14.25 


219.3 




Basic Iron, Valley, ton 


42.50 


12.50 


240.0 


1 


Bessemer Iron, Pittsburgh, ton 


45.95 


14.70 


212.6 




Gray Forge, Pittsburgh, ton 


40.95 


13.35 


206.7 


i 


Billets, Bessemer, Pittsburgh, ton 


95.00 


21.00 


352.4 


i 


Billets, Open Hearth, Philadelphia, ton 


95.00 


22.02 


331.4 


§ 


Wire Rods, Pittsburgh, ton 


90.00 


25.00 


260.0 




Steel Bars, Pittsburgh, 100 pounds 


4.00 


1.25 


220.0 




Wire Nails, Pittsburgh, 100 pounds 


3.50 


1.55 


125.8 




Tank Plates, Pittsburgh, 100 pounds 


7.00 


1.20 


483.3 


1 


Structural Beams, Pittsburgh, 100 pounds 


4.00 


1.20 


233.3 






Freight Claim Department — 
Cooperative Claim Prevention 

The Troubles of Mr. Way-Bill and the 
Freight Family 




No. 8— Delivery 



Continued Mr. Way-Bill, "Last month I was digging into 
definitions and I found that 1 station ' was defined etymologically 
as ' a point, a state or place of rest or inactivity.' 

"This definition applies only to the real estate and not to the 
man named 'Mr. Agent' or to his fellow employes at the station, 
as these are the men who put the keystone into the arch of trans- 
portation activity. They are the men upon whom the Company 
depends to make the delivery right-side-up-with-care at destina- 
tion count for dollars and cents to the railroad. 

"Every baseball fan knows that no score counts until the 
runner crosses the home plate. A soliciting agent may make a 
hit by securing a shipment, and an efficient train service may 
put it on second or third, but unless proper delivery puts it over 
the plate the score does not count. 

"When the goose eggs pile up on the scoreboard and the field- 
ing errors multiply along the road or in the station, the claims 
begin to tally in the Auditor's office. 

"What does the umpire say are errors in delivery ? 

"Why failure to properly notify the consignee and get the goods 
off of our hands, or letting some fellow get goods that do not 
belong to him. 

"Some fellows would get sore if the savings bank paid out 
money on their account without proper orders, but losses of that 
kind are just what happens when they deliver freight in error to 
the wrong man. 

"Sometimes taking another look over the freight warehouse 
for missing goods locates the shipment ( with marks down) and 
cuts out a claim. What's the matter with taking that other look 
instead of letting George do it? George is a rank outsider, 
don't let him feel that he should run your job. 

"It's tough to think that one man's lack of care lets in a claim that kills off what another man 
has done to boost revenue. 

"Claims are preventable, and when you lose faith in your ability to prevent them your main-spring is 
out of order. It's up to you to keep your main-spring wound." 

Taking another look for missing freight cuts out a claim 
Good service is the Railroad's best advertisement 

Put into transportation watchful care and sleepless vigilance and you get Delivery 

— //. Irving Martin 



The Menace of the Mosquito and How it 
Can be Eliminated 



By Dr. E. M. Parlett 

Chief of Welfare Bureau 



SINCE it was discovered that the 
mosquito is the conveyor of 
malaria, yellow fever and other 
diseases, a great deal of interest 
this insect has been awakened and 
remedial action taken by indi- 

•elief of 



m 

much 

viduals and communities for the 
humanity. 

It was not, however, until Colonel 
Gorgas demonstrated at the Panama 
Canal Zone, on a large scale and with 
such brilliant results now known to 
practically all civilized 
mankind, that the 
wholesale destruction 
of mosquitoes meant 
the complete eradica- 
tion of yellow fever, 
malaria, filariasis and 
dengue that the world 
was convinced and an 
awakened interest be- 
came manifest. 

In certain districts 
of the United States 
malaria does more 
damage to life and 
health than all other 
diseases combined, and 
it seems plain that in 
these districts too 
much attention can- 
not be given to meas- 
ures for the proper 
control of the disease 
and its vector. 

Mosquitoes are thus proved to be a 
direct and distinct menace to our health 
and comfort. Malaria and yellow fever, 
without question, owe their prevalence 
to them, as they are the only known 



\ 


/ 


\ 

\ 

\ 


/ 

till 






J 




/ 1 

' / 




/ 

1 


\ 



FIG. 5.- 



means of transmitting these diseases, 
and our health is also encroached upon 
by the loss of rest and sleep and the 
destruction of our quietude and comfort 
occasioned by the bite and song of the 
"female of the species," which, in the 
case of the mosquito at least, is decidedly 
more deadly than the male." 

The control of malaria and yellow 
fever requires their extermination. 

How are we to go about the process 
of exterminating the mosquito? 

First — those who 
need information on 
the subject must be 
supplied with it; must 
be made to under- 
stand what must be 
accomplished and to 
realize the full import- 
ance of the work. 
Each unit of the com- 
munity should work 
to its fullest capacity, 
and with continued 
application, toward 
the elimination of this 
pest. 

Second — m o s q u i t o 
shelters and breeding 
places must be de- 
stroyed, or so treated 
that breeding becomes 
impossible. This must 
be done periodically 
where the nature of 
the breeding ground does not permit of 
permanent eradication, and at varying 
intervals where the water supply is not 
constant and dependent upon rains, 
drainage, etc. This work is a COm- 

47 



-FEMALE ANOPHELES MOSQUITO 
THE MALARIA CARRIER 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



munity affair, and every member of the 
community has a duty to perform in the 
removal or destruction of all possible 
breeding places. Community cooper- 
ation is actually essential in such work. 
While citizens working alone may, and 
will, achieve certain limited and quite 
desirable results, it requires the entire 
community working as a unit to thoroughly 
accomplish the complete extinction of 
this pest, otherwise the work is but pal- 
liative. And at the same time the 
community will gain much in health and 
general community attractiveness by the 
destruction of these breeding places and 
its attendant general cleaning up, which 
naturally follow. 

During the summer months extraor- 
dinary precautions must be taken to 




FIG. 13 —HOW THE BABY CULEX MOSQUITO 
BREATHES. THE LINE AT TOP OF 
CUT REPRESENTS THE SURFACE 
OF THE WATER 



prevent disease and to promote whole- 
some ideals of practical sanitation. It 
is to the interest of all citizens to work 
with their respective local health depart- 
ments toward this end. It is most advisa- 
ble to get in touch with the health officer 
and tell him of your purpose to cooperate 
with his department. Let the news- 
papers know of your civic pride and thus 
become the originator of a sanitary cru- 
sade in your own neighborhood. Before 
long other members of your com- 
munity will become as deeply interested 
in their own health and the health of the 
community as you are, and you will 
be surprised at your own accomplish- 
ment. Your ambition and interest will 



prove both welcome and beneficial alike 
to your health department and to your 
neighbors. 

In warm weather it takes but one day 
for the eggs of the mosquito to open, 
permitting the larvae or " wiggle tails" 
to emerge. The "wiggle tails" are one- 




FIG. 11.— PATTERNS ASSUMED BY MALARIAL 
MOSQUITO EGGS ON THE WATER 

eighth of an inch in length and develop 
into what are generally called "tumblers" 
in about one week (customarily five days 
in warm weather). In about another 
week (five to seven days) the thin head- 
covering of the "tumblers" opens and full 
fledged, fully equipped, young and vigor- 
ous mosquitoes emerge, ready to fly and 
determined to menace the health and 
comfort of human beings within range of 
their activity. 

The breeding female is the only mos- 
quito that survives over winter, migrating 
for that purpose to the darkest and damp- 
est corner of the cellar, or to some similar 
place. In the spring the female seeks 
standing or still water, no matter how 
small the amount, in which to deposit 
her 200 or more eggs. Almost any puddle 
will serve for the development of these 
eggs and, unless proper precautions are 
taken, such puddles are usually to be 
found on the premises, near the place 
of winter hibernation. 




FIG. 10.-A RAFT OF CULEX MOSQUITO 
EGGS ON THE WATER 

A careful survey of your premises 
should therefore be made to see that there 
are no loose bricks in the yard or pave- 
ment. Such depressions hold sufficient 
water long enough to become the breed- 
ing place of mosquitoes. Tin cans, lids, 
saucers, flower pots, sagging roof gutters, 
buckets, barrels, pools of stagnant water, 
etc., are examples of conditions which 
may serve as breeding places for mos- 
quitoes. II is well to know that many 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



4!) 



crops of mosquitoes are also bred indoors ; 
in cellars, defective indoor drains and 
toilet fixtures, sinks and neglected water 
pitchers, tubs, flower pots, pans or other 
receptacles holding even a quite small 
quantity of water. 

The anopheles (transmitter of malaria) 
mosquito and the culex, the two varieties 




FIG. 15. — OUTLINE SKETCH OF MALARIAL 
MOSQUITO "WRIGGLER" 

most common to us, are bred in close 
proximity to our dwellings. Mosquitoes 
are frail of wing and theiefore are not long- 
distance travelers, as is thought by some. 
Under usual circumstances they do not 
fly over two or three hundred feet from 
their breeding places. This makes the 
task of seeking out breeding places some- 
what easier than it otherwise would be. 
It follows, therefore, that if you are 
annoyed by mosquitoes in your home 
you may be quite certain the breeding 
place is near at hand, perhaps on your 
own premises. 

It should not be forgotten that by kill- 
ing one female mosquito in the spring one 




FIG. 14.— BABY MALARIAL MOSQUITO 
BREATHING 



really slaughters them by the thousand, 
for each spring female mosquito is the 
potential source of thousands of these 
summer pests. As in the case of the 



fly, it is easier and much more satis- 
factory and profitable to destroy the 
breeding places of mosquitoes than to 
attempt to obtain relief later by swatting 
or by fumigation with insect powder or 
sulphur. But it may be said that > 
fumigation in the spring, before the 
female has deposited her eggs, is a very 
effective means of mosquito elimination, 
if properly carried out. This fumigation 
stupefies but does not kill. The stupi- 
fied mosquitoes fall to the floor and 
should be swept up and burned. But 
swat, or otherwise kill, every mosquito 
seen about the house. 

Marshes, pools and swamps should be 
drained or if possible filled in; weeds 
should be cut down, for during the day 




FIG. 16.— PUPAE; 1 CULEX; 2. ANOPHELES; 3 
AEDES CALOPUS. (AFTER HOWARD) 

it is the habit of mosquitoes to shelter 
themselves from the sun in weeds and 
high grass, standing water in barrels, 
buckets and other receptacles, when such 
collections of water are necessary for fire 
protection or other useful purpose, should 
be covered, and a thorough cleaning up 
of trash and water holding debris should 
be made. Where such methods are not 
practical, the surface of all collections of 
standing water, other than that used for 
fire protection, no matter whether foul 



50 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




or otherwise, should be covered with a 
thin film of kerosene oil. 

One ounce of kerosene oil is sufficient 
to thoroughly cover fifteen square feet 
of water area. This should be repeated 
every two weeks for permanent success. 

Baby mosquitoes 
— the "wrig- 
glers/' or 
"wiggle tails" 
and " tumblers" 
— are killed by 
suffocation by 
the layer of oil 
on the surface of 
the water. It is 
customary for 
the baby mos- 
quitoes to get 
breathing air by 
coming to the 
surface of the 
water at fre- 
quent intervals, breathing through their 
"respiratory siphons," as shown in the 
accompanying illustration, wriggling and 
tumbling in their efforts to do so. The 
film of oil shuts off the air supply and 
they necessarily die of suffocation. 



FIG. 1.— NORMAL RED 
BLOOD CELLS, AND RED 
BLOOD CELLS CONTAIN- 
ING MALARIAL PARA- 
SITES 



I 
\ 






















\ 



FEMALE CULEX MOSQUITO 

The modus operandi of malaria trans- 
mission from man to man through the 
agency of the mosquito (the only known 

agency) is as follows: 

When sucking the blood of a human 
l>eing Buffering from malaria the mosquito 
necessarily sucks into iis stomach with 



the blood millions of the small animal 
malarial parasites that feed upon and 
destroy the red blood cells of man. 
The malarial parasites in developing 
within the body of the mosquito find their 
way into the mouth (the salivary gland), 
which produces saliva to dilute or thin 
the human blood. The blood otherwise 
is of too bulky a consistency to be 
sucked through the delicate bill of 
the mosquito. When this saliva, teem- 
ing with malaria parasites, is thus injected 
by the mosquito into the wound it makes 
when sucking blood, these parasites get 
into the human system and thence the 
blood stream, destroying the red blood 
corpuscles and by multiplying produce 
the toxines which cause the devitalizing 
disease which we know as malaria, as 
mentioned above. Thus it will be seen 
that malaria is not caused by eating 





FIG. 3— RESTING POSTURE OF MOSQUI- 
TOES; 1 AND 2 ANOPHELES; 3 CULEX 
PIPIENS. (AFTER SAMBON) 

improper food or by drinking contami- 
nated water, or by the night air, as was 
formerly thought. It is caused only by 
the bite of the mosquito. In certain 
sections this disease not only causes many 
deaths and much disability, but seriously 
interferes with the physical efficiency of 
the wage earner and of other classes 
as well. 

To prevent mosquitoes from biting 
healthy people, mosquito bars should 
be used, and houses, camp cars, etc., 
should be thoroughly screened with No. 
16 wire mesh. Holes in screen doors and 
other neglected places of entrance about 
the house or sleeping chamber, including 
open fire places and ventilator openings, 
serve as traps which permit mosquitoes 
to enter during the night. They are 
unable to again find the opening in day- 
light and thus remain to increase in 

numbers w il hin I he house. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



51 



Persons who have had malaria should 
remain in a screened house at night, to 
prevent the spread of the disease to 
others, through the medium of the mos- 
quito. Such individuals are called " car- 
riers " and are likely to have parasites in 




STOMACH OF ANOPHELES. MOSQUITO 
CONTAINING MALARIAL PARASITES 

their blood for weeks and months, after 
they have apparently and practically re- 
covered from the disease. " Carriers" 
spread malaria in a community to as 
large an extent as do those suffering 
with the manifest symptoms of the 
disease (chills and fever). 

Quinine is the only known specific for 
malaria and when taken by well people 
in small doses (three grains a day after 
meals for adults) during the malarial 
season, will effectively prevent the dis- 
ease. " Carriers" should be treated dur- 
ing and between seasons, for the com- 
plete destruction of the parasites in 
the blood stream and, in addition, to 
avoid the danger of relapse, which in 
some cases may occur several times. 
Such relapses at times follow lengthy in- 
tervals of perfect health. 

Summary: To prevent malaria, get 
rid of the anopheles mosquito. To avoid 
annoyance and discomfort, loss of sleep 
and skin irritation and occasionally blood 
poisoning therefrom, get rid of all mos- 
quitoes — by the destruction of their 



breeding places and shelters. The 
methods best adapted to this end are: 
Cutting down weeds and high grass, 
draining or filling in swamps and marshes, 
a general community cleaning up and the 
removal of receptacles holding stagnant 
water; by oiling the surface of water col- 
lections that do not permit of other 
measures of treatment as above outlined, 
by introducing into sluggish streams fish 
of the minnow species, which devour the 
larvae, by "swatting," and by the fumi- 
gation of houses and cellars, followed by 
sweeping up and burning the stupefied 
mosquitoes. 

Second: The thorough screening of 
houses, camp cars, etc., against the in- 
vasion of the mosquito. 

Third: In infested districts to im- 
munize well people against malaria by 
small doses of quinine, frequently admin- 




SPRAYING SURFACE OF WATER WITH 
KEROSENE OIL TO DESTROY BABY 
MOSQUITOES 

istered, and to treat those suffering with 
malaria until they are completely cured 
and cease, as "carriers," to be a menace 
to others, and by keeping such persons 
within screened homes at night until 
cured. 



One of the most satisfactory known remedies for mosquito bites is household ammonia. 
Others recommended are alcohol, glycerin and moist soap rubbed gently over the punctures. 



l 

i 
i 
i 

l 



A two-cent smile gets more for you than a ten dollar frown. 

Get together — too many cooks may spoil the broth, but it takes "all hands and 
the cook" to keep Safety work stirred up. — Henry Bergstrom, Member Chicago 
Divisional Safety First Committee. 



* 



i? 

i 

II 



1; 



52 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




If Baltimore and Ohio ff 

Employes Magazine 

j I j ! 

li 11 
1 1 ii 

n i Artiiur W. Grahame, Editor i I 

11 II 

Herbert D. Stitt, Staff Artist | i 

1 1 1 1 

| I George B. Luckey, Staff Photographer | I 

II 11 
II 11 

□ □ mmmam , arnma o. , , , u ommm n i ) . t □ □ 

Further Changes on Magazine 
Staff 

HE war has caused another change 
in the personnel of the Magazine 
staff. Our readers will remember 
that last May the editor, Robert 
M. Van Sant, was furloughed to attend 
the first Officers' Reserve Corps Training 
Camp, at Fort Myer, Va. Mr. Van 
Sant successfully completed his training 
and has been commissioned a second 
lieutenant of infantry in the National 
Army. 

Herbert D. Stitt, the Magazine staff 
artist, also attended the first training 
camp and made a most creditable record 
for himself. However, the final physical 
examination disclosed the fact that he 
had developed a slight physical defect 
while undergoing the rigorous training, 
and he has therefore returned to his posi- 
tion with the Magazine. 

The latest member of the staff to enter 
military service is Arthur W. Grahame, 
associate editor, who has been acting as 
editor in Mr. Van Sant's absence. Mr. 
Grahame has been furloughed to attend 
the second Officers' Reserve Corps Train- 
ing Camp at Fort Myer, which opens on 
August 27. He is succeeded by Frank 
A. O'Connell, a Baltimore newspaper 
man of wide experience;, who will take 
charge beginning with the September 
issue. 



The Faultfinder 

BHE world's greatest nuisance is 
the faultfinder, for he is con- 
spicuous everywhere. He does 
not hide his light under a bushel 
nor speak in a whisper. His mission is 
to be seen and heard. 

The Creator in six days made the 
universe and when it was finished de- 
clared that the work was good. Yet, 
since its creation, the world has been full 
of faultfinders who do not think it is 
good enough for them. 

The peculiarity of the habitual fault- 
finder is that he has no reason to find 
fault. He disturbs the serenity of those 
who are happy and who would enjoy 
peace and contentment but for him. 

Nothing satisfies the faultfinder and 
no era has been free from his tantalizing 
presence. The faultfinders exasperated 
Moses on the mount until he dashed to 
pieces the stone tablets inscribed with 
the first written laws of God. But the 
Ten Commandments remain the law of 
God and man. 

The faultfinder is the bane of the 
family circle. He undermines affection, 
destroys peace and breeds discontent. 
He is the fly in the ointment, the unwel- 
come intruder. He makes the task of 
the genuine reformer more difficult. 

He blocks the path of progress. He 
cumbers the statutes with unnecessary 
and unworkable laws. He dictates de- 
structive policies to those in authority 
and makes them cower before his vitriolic 
tongue, his poisonous pen and pestiferous 
persistence. 

No church has been without its fault- 
finder, no social organization; no shop, 
factory or office and no movement for 
the public good is exempt from his 
intrusion. 

The faultfinder is found everywhere, 
scattering the seeds of distrust, poisoning 
the minds of those who will listen, mar- 
shalling the forces of unreason, casting 
shadows on the sun, dimming the light 
of the stars, mocking the hopes of hu- 
manity and challenging the goodness of a 
beneficent Providence. 

Out with the faultfinder! We have no 
room for him. — Leslie's Weekly. 




Handling Once 

From "Ford Times" 




ID YOU ever stop to think of the profits that could be made 
through handling everything that enters into a business only 
once? 



<I How many times during the day, whether your position be that of 
office-boy, manager, shop foreman, machine-hand, or superintendent, 
do you find yourself handling things twice that could have been as well 
or better handled once? 

<I Anything that saves time is a Profit-Maker. 

<I Handling once is certainly a time-saver, and yet how few employes 
engaged today in any large business try to acquire this profitable habit. 
^ In replying to correspondence, for illustration, see to it that every 
question asked in the inquirer's letter is fully answered. Don't make 
necessary the writing of a second and possibly a third communication 
by not covering the matter completely in your first letter by "handling 
once." Postage is thus saved both ways, stationery, typewriter's time, 
the customer's time, and your own time. 

f§ There is always room at the top for the man who can be relied upon 
to more promptly deliver the goods by handling them only once. 
^ Handling once is a star accomplishment. It is the master-key that 
fits all the locks of business progression. 

<I To pass along this idea of "handling once" is to multiply its power in 
doing things quickly and economically. 

<J The waste basket is a valuable utility in the handling once of some 
things. Many things find their way into desk drawers and letter-files 
that should go directly to the rag-man. Red tape is system handled 
twice — so don't let out so much that it requires rewinding but handle 
it only once. 

<J Just figure out some day how many times you handled something 
twice. Beginning things and not finishing them is in the double handling 
class. Learn how to talk by saying it right the first time — by stating 
plainly and in understandable language what you want to say. 
^ Lack of thoroughness in not handling once is one of the universal 
faults of all average employes, and marks the difference in nine cases 
out of ten between the live ones who are really doing things and the 
others who are only half trying. 



j/z. 




\^ Statement of Pension Feature I 




Employes who have been honorably retired during the month of July, 1917, and to whom pensions 
have been granted : 



NAME 



Ambrose, John W 

Butler, John H 

Counselman, Francis A 

Dixon, William H 

Hipsley, James W 

Jaracki, John 

Jordan, John P 

Maxon, Calvin, H 

McKelvey, Elom C 

Ragsdale, Randolph. . . . 
Snyder, John W 



LAST OCCUPATION 



DEPARTMENT 



DIVISION 



Engineer C. T 

Conductor C. T 

Machinist M. P 

Mail Carrier C. T 

Conductor ! C. T 

Car Repairer M. P 

Electrical Engineer . . ! Electrical 

Crossing Watchman. . C. T 

Fireman C. T 

Laborer M. P 

Car Inspector M. P 



Cumberland 
Baltimore . . 
Baltimore. 

Indiana 

Cumberland 

Chicago 

Baltimore . . . 

Ohio 

Chicago 

Indiana 

Baltimore . . . 



YEARS OF 
SERVICE 



31 
36 
48 
10 
35 
25 
40 
33 
35 
18 
32 



The payments to pensioned employes constitute a special roll contributed by the Company. 

During the calendar year of 1916, over $296,000 was paid out through the Pension Feature to 

those who had been honorably retired. 

The total payments since the inauguration of the Pension Feature on October 1, 1884, have 
amounted to $3,107,926.10. 



After having served the Company faithfully for a number of years, the following employes have 
died: 



NAME 



Durkin, Patrick 

Clark, Patrick 

Evatt, George K 

Merklin, Albert 

Brady, Joseph J 

Linebaugh, Wm. M 
Jones, Edward S . . 
McNeir, Theodore W. 



LAST OCCUPATION 


DEPART- 
MENT 


DIVISION 


DATE OF 
DEATH 


YEARS OF 
SERVICE 


Station Cleaner 

Watchman 

Pipe Fitter 

Clerk 

Yard Engineer 

Agent 

Door Fitter 

Switchman 


M.ofW. 

C. T 

M. P. . 
C. T ... . 
C. T 
C. T. 
M. P 
C. T 


Monongah 
Pittsburgh. . . 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Baltimore 

Ohio 

Baltimore 
Baltimore 


June 26, 1917 
July 1, 1917. 
July 2, 1917. 
July 5, 1917. 
July 11, 1917. 
July 25, 1917 
July 28, 1917. . 
July 29, 1917. . 


27 
35 
21 
40 
50 

42 
36 



54 



Bando Club Girls Prove Their Patriotism 
By Taking Up Red Cross Work 



By Miss Edith Henderson 



line with the general trend of 
current events the Bando Club 

I<£0&1 nas ta ^ en U P Cross work. 

I SB J The club has had this matter in 
contemplation for many weeks, and 
arranged for a lecture by Mrs. Julius 
Freeman, who is Chairman of Receiving 
and Packing, Women's Department, Red 
Cross Association. Many features of 
Red Cross work were taken up and ex- 
plained thoroughly by Mrs. Freeman, 
who, by the way, is not only an en- 
thusiastic Red Cross worker, but a 
speaker of ability and delightful per- 
sonality. As the result of this lecture 
a number of the Bando Club girls wished 
to start the work at once, but because of 
the rehearsals for the opera " Mikado," 
it was necessary to postpone definite 
action until about the middle of May. 

The necessary arrangements as to 
time and place of meeting, instructors, 
etc., were finally completed and the Club 
now has three first-aid classes which 
meet weekly. The first class started 
Saturday night, May 12, with twenty- 
five members. This class, of which Miss 
Grace Berghoff is chairman, is under 
the instruct on of Dr. Mareno. Wednes- 
day night proved to be very convenient 
for a good many members, and conse- 
quently the second or Wednesday night 
class grew rapidly to a membership of 
fifty. This class started the course on 
May 16, and because of its size required 
the combined services of Dr. Egan and 
Dr. Growt, with Miss Elizabeth Diehl 
as chairman. Later, however", the 
Wednesday night class was divided into 
two divisions. Dr. Growt is instructor 



and Miss Virginia Smith chairman of the 
second Wednesday night division. When 
first started all classes were held in 
McCoy Hall, but since the Red Cross 
Association has moved from there into 
some of the old Hopkins buildings it has 
been necessary to find other quarters, 
and Dr. Growt's class now meets in the 
amphitheatre of Maryland General 
Hospital, and Doctors Egan and 
Mareno' s classes will meet in the new 
Y. W. C. A. building. 

The course in first aid consists of ten 
lessons and is free to Bando Club mem- 
bers, the Bando Club paying all fees and 
other expenses. The three classes which 
have been formed are now well started 
and going strong, and it is hoped that all 
will persevere to the end and take the 
examination required by the Red Cross 
Association before one can qualify as a 
bona fide " first aider." Absence from 
more than two class lessons forfeits the 
privilege of taking the Red Cross exami- 
nation; but even if one never takes the 
examination the course itself is rich in 
useful information and is decidedly well 
worth while. Bandaging, for instance, 
is a most useful art, and probably no 
girl present during Dr. Mareno 's lecture 
failed to learn something which she 
should know about the subject and 
possibly could not have become familiar 
with in any o^her way. A small boy 
scout makes an excellent subject on 
which to demonstrate the various 
methods of bandaging. 

The Bando Club is indeed fortunate 
in having such capable and enthusiastic 
instructors as Dr. Egan and Dr. Mareno, 



56 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




"TOMMY ATKINS" CALLS A WOUND SERIOUS ENOUGH TO SEND HIM BACK TO ENGLAND- 

BUT NOT SERIOUS ENOUGH TO CAUSE HIM OVER MUCH SUFFERING— "A BLIGHTY" 
And it is said that he rather welcomes it. If the English nursss look like those Bando Club girls we don't blame him! 



of the University Hospital, and Dr. 
Growt of the Maryland General Hospital. 
These doctors are giving their time and 
services, and the Bando Club welcomes 
this opportunity to express its sincere 
gratitude for their instruction, and 
genuine admiration of the splendid spirit 
in which these gentlemen have responded 
to the call which has become universal 
in its scope — the call to serve. To 
Doctors Egan, Mareno and Growt, as 
well as to the Maryland General Hospital 
and the Y. W. C. A., the Bando Club is 
deeply obligated. 

Thus far the Bando Club has confined 
its efforts to first aid work, but may later 
lake up other phases of Red Cross work, 
such as home nursing, surgical dressings, 
etc. For those club members who wish 
to do something for their country, but 
who do not feel that they can attend 
classes regularly, a Red Cross Circle is 
suggested. For instance, the Bando 
Club might pledge itself to supply and 
keep replenished some of the contents 
of box No. 8, which contains, among 
other thing , substitutes for handker- 
chiefs. These articles are very easily 
made, require no sewing, being merely 
old clean linen lorn or cut ^o a certain 
size, packed in a certain way and kept 
ready for use at a certain specified place, 
probably a base hospital. The material 
for these simple but necessary articles 



might be supplied by our Dining Car De- 
partment from old table linen, etc. 
Thus a very useful work could be carried 
on without overtaxing the strength of 
girls who spend all day in offices, without 
making too great a demand on their 
time, and without expense to anyone. 

Oh, it is a great work! and has many 
ramifications which are continually open- 
ing up new avenues of usefulness to 
women who are anxious to do something 
for the men who are being called upon 
to do so much for them, and it is no small 
satisfaction to realize that what is done 
in this work will mean actual personal 
relief and comfort to some sick and 
suffering soldier. 

Red Cross Work 

By Amelia Josephine Burr 

of the Vigilantes 

Interminable folds of gauze 
For those whom we shall never see. 
Remember, when your fingers pause, 
That every drop of blood to stain 
This whiteness, falls for you and me, 
Part of the price that keeps us free 
To serve our own, that keeps us clean 
From shan that other women know — 
Oh saviours we have never seen, 
Forgive us thai we arc so slow! 
God if that blood should cry in vain 
And we have let our moment go! 



Can You Can? 



By Reinette Lovewell 

of the Vigilantes 



OUR cities are full of country-born 
young business women who can 
and do can. Some of them turn 
the trick with a tireless cooker 
and some of them on top of the gas range 
in their tiny apartment kitchens. They 
do it after a hard day's work, too. And 
pay prices for the stuff they preserve 
that is enough to make any farm person's 
hair stand right up on end. But they 
believe it's well worth the time and the 
trouble. 

How about all the folks who have 
vegetables and fruit right on their own 
grounds which will go to waste if it isn't 
"put up"? This year not a solitary 
string bean ought to be allowed to go to 
seed, not a tomato rot, or a pea pod turn 
yellow. 

Trot out all the fruit jars around the 
house, empty out the string and tacks 
and coupons and make them work. 
Don't miss the one on the cellar stairs, or 
the other full of clothes pins in the attic. 
There are rubbers to be had at the 
grocer's and it is good policy to get a fresh 
supply every year. 

Cold packing is the easiest way and 
the quickest way — no standing over a 
hot stove. Blanch vegetables by boiling 
in a cloth bag that can be lifted out 
easily. Then cold plunge in a pail of 
water. Pack in jar, put on rubber and 
cover and set in hot water on a false 
bottom in a wash boiler or deep pail. A 



fine mesh wire netting is a good bottom, 
or a board with holes bored in it. Tops 
of jars must always be covered and you 
must be sure to have a cover that fits 
tight. In case of doubt put a cloth 
over the kettle before the cover is put 
on and a brick on top of the cover. 

Here is Uncle Sam's Own Time-Table 
for cooking vegetables: 





Scald 


Size Can 


Cook 


Asparagus 


5-10 m. 


pt. or qt. 


1 


hr. 


Beans 


5 m. 


pt. or qt. 


H 


hr. 


Beets 


6 m. 


qt. 


l 


hr. 


Carrots 


5 m. 


qt. 


l 


hr. 


Corn, on or off cob 


5-10 m. 


pt. or qt. 


4 


hr 


Greens 


10 m. 


qt. 




hr 


Parsnips 


5 m. 


qt. 


If 


hr 


Peas 


5 m. 


qt. 


1 


hr 


Pumpkin 


5 m. 


qt. 


1 


hr 


Rhubarb 


1-3 m. 


qt. 


15 


m 


Squash 


5 m. 


qt. 


1 


hr 


Succotash (as for 










corn and beans) 




pt. or qt. 


1 


hr 


Swiss Chard 


10 m. 


qt. 


H 


hr 


Tomatoes 


1-2 m. 


pt. or qt. 


22 


m. 


Turnips 


6 m. 


qt. 


If 


hr 



After cooking, take out jars and clamp 
or screw on covers as tightly as possible. 
Invert the jars so that if the seal is not 
all right the jar will leak. If there is any 
froth or foam inside after twenty-four 
hours, they need a few minutes more 
cooking. Put the jars back in the cold 
water, loosen the top, let the water come 
to the boiling point and cook a few min- 
utes longer. Then screw on the top 
securely and put away till eating time. 



Baltimore and Ohio Women for the Nation's Service 



Home Dressmaker's Corner 



A Sleeveless Nightgown Combining Both Empire and 

Surplice Effects in Original Style 

i 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



T— 1HE heart of the summer woman 
will just yearn for one of these 
jfigSS ( ' (,< ^ ;U1< ^ dainty sleevelees night- 
BaS gowns made in Empire style. 
Soft batiste is used for development of 
this model, which is to be slipped on 




CONSTRUCTION GUIDE T291 




Patented April 30, 1907 



over the head. The front and back 
are attached to a yoke which crosses in 
surplice style and is trimmed with hand 
embroidery. A dainty satin ribbon is 
inserted between the rows of stitching 
fco draw nightgown closely to the figure. 
In medium size fche design requires 3% 
yards 36-inch batiste. The shoulder 
points are held (together with ribbon bows. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



59 



CLTTlNGGUIDE.7 r 291 Shovvin ? SrLe . 36 



FRONT 




^OLD Of 36 INCH MATERIAL 



Patented April 30. 1907 



Follow the guides and make no mis- 
takes should be the motto of the home 
dressmaker. To cut the nightgown, first 
fold the batiste in half and on the 
lengthwise fold place the front section. 
The piecing comes next, and this is laid 
with the straight edge even with the 
selvage of the material. Below the 
piecing, place the back and front yokes, 
then large "0" perforations resting on a 
lengthwise thread of material. There 
will be just enough batiste remaining for 
the back, which is laid on the lengthwise 
fold, and the piecing for the back. 

Having placed each section firmly on 
the material cut with sharp scissors and 
put aside each section until it is needed. 
The next step is to close the under-arm 
seams as notched, then attach ribbons 
at the shoulder 
points of yoke in 
front and back and 
tie. If the edges 
of the yoke are to 
be trimmed with 
embroidery, the 
handwork must be 
done before even 
cutting the gown. 
Lap the front and 
back yokes, match- 
ing centers and 
baste to position. 
The double small 
"oo" perforations 
indicate the center- 
front and the single 
small u o" perfora- 
tions, the center- 
back of the yoke. 
Baste the lower 
lapped edges to- 
gether. 

Next, gather the 
front and back on 
crossline of small 
"o" perforations 
and J/o inch below; 
arrange on yoke, 




bringing upper row of gathers to small "o" 
pei f orations in yoke, matching center- 
fronts, center-backs, under-arm seams 
and large u O" perforations; stitch to 
position along the two rows of gathers; 
insert ribbon between the gathers to 
draw the garment in to the required 
size. 

Turn hem at lower edge of night- 
gown on small "o" perforations. 

If something more luxurious is desired 
for a gift, this nightgown may be devel- 
oped in crepe Georgette, which though 
filmy, is very durable and exquisite in 
coloring. 

Nightgown No. 7291. Sizes, 32, 36, 40, 44. 
Price, 15 cents. 

An Attractive Costume 

7324 — Ladies' Costume (25 cents). Six sizes, 
34 to 44 bust. Width of skirt in 39-inch length 
about 2 yards. Size 36 requires 5f yards 40- 
inch material for costume with applied side- 
panels, or 4| yards 40-inch for costume without 
side-panels. One-piece sleeves gathered to deep 
two-piece cuffs, or one-piece flowing sleeves 
that may be plaited under straight bands. 
Two-piece gathered skirt, with straight lower 
edge, is attached to waist at natural waist- 
line. No lining. 

12321 — Braiding transfer 
pattern in blue or yellow 
(3| yards, 2|-inch border 
and 12 motifs), 15 cents. 



A Distinctive 
Child's Dress 

7292 — Girls' and Jun- 
iors' Dress (15 cents). 
Five sizes, 6 to 14 years. 
Size 8 requires 3£ yards 
36-inch material. Without 
lining. Waist closes in 
front; has open neck fin- 
ished with a large square 
collar, perforated for round 
collar. One-piece sleeves 
gathered to cuffs, per- 
forated for shorter sleeves. 
Attached two-piece skirt, 
gathered at the top and 
plaited infront inpanelstyle. 





The Needleworker's Corner 



A "Love" of a Novelty is the Cupid 
Embroidery 

A Roman Cut-Work Used in the Development 
of Exquisite New Household Linens 

Courtesy "Pictorial Review" 



3 



mHE war has stimulated the mak- 
ing of embroideries. Many 
. mral women who cannot help in any 
BSSBI other way find themselves able 
to contribute their "bit" by doing fancy 
work for the various bazaars and fairs 
held to raise money to help the men at 
the front. 

Household linens of novel design are 
in great demand and the latest cupid 
designs are exquisite in their sentiment 
and appearance. The centerpiece shown 
here is twenty-seven inches in diameter 
and is done principally in Roman cut- 
work. Accompanying it is a cupid 
medallion which may be applied to 
curtains, scarfs, bedspreads, etc., if one 
desires to make a complete dining room 
or bedroom set. 

Cut-work is done in buttonhole stitch 
and is very easy to work, once the prin- 



/ ^Jd^MK^ X 





No. 123M ci l Il> MEDALLION 



Xo. 12360— CEXTERPIECE IX CUT-WORK 

ciple is mastered. There is quite a fad 
now for inserting these cut-work motifs 
in figure design in net curtains, dresser 
and sideboard scarfs, bedspreads of 
linen, centerpieces, and elaborate house- 
hold linens. They are very effective. 
In this centerpiece three are inserted, 
with a spray of embroidery above, worked 
out in raised satin stitch and eyelets. 
The edge is scalloped and buttonholed. 
The transfer pattern is blue and contains, 
besides the design for this centerpiece, 
another motif in cut-work, with reverse 
motif of each of the two, so that they 
may be matched up for curtains if 
desired. There are three duplicates of 
each of the four motifs. 

No. 12360 — Transfer pattern, blue, contains the 
centerpiece illustrated and three duplicates each 
of three oi her cut-work motifs which maybe used 
on the same centerpiece or curtains; 20 cents. 

Design for 27-inch centerpiece stamped on 
w hitc art linen, $1 , 10; white embroidery cotton 
25 cents. 

Pictorial Review patterns on sale by local 
agents. 



St^CtAL MERIT ROLL 



Staten Island Division 

Painter foreman Joseph Williams, of Clifton, 
recently discovered and removed a track 
obstruction West of Clifton yard. He is 
commended for his alertness. 

Philadelphia Division 

On July 4 brakeman J. D. Wingate discov- 
ered a defective condition on a car in train 
pulling out of siding at Clayton Tower. He 
reported it and is commended. 

On July 31 G. M. Biddle, operator at Singerly 
Tower, noticed a defective condition of equip- 
ment on a car in train of engine extra west 
4040, which was passing his office. He reported 
it to the dispatcher, and the train was stopped 
at Foys Hill and repairs made. A credit entry 
has been placed on Mr. Biddle's service record. 

On July 9 brakeman C. J. Nickol discovered 
a defective condition on a car in train of extra 
west 4031 and had the car set off. His alertness 
is much appreciated. 

On July 15 brakeman L. Haslup discovered 
a defective condition. He is commended. 

H. W. Routenberg, assistant supervisor at 
Wilmington, is commended for discovering 
and having repaired defective conditions on 
June 28 and July 7. 



On May 25 engineer John Currinder dis 
covered a defective condition on a car in 
passing train. He is commended. 

On June 13 Charles Young, a machinist 
helper at East Side, noticed a defective con- 
dition on a car in train second No. 94. He noti- 
fied the conductor, and is commended. 

Baltimore Division 

Recently, as extra east 4859 was leaving 
Reels Mill, brakeman A. J. Miller discovered 
a defective condition on one of the cars in the 
train. He stopped the train and with a helper 
set the car off. He is commended for his alert- 
ness and interest in the welfare of the Company. 

Wheeling Division 

On July 17 agent E. S. Earle discovered a 
defective condition on a car of gravel for Mor- 
gantown, which was standing on the storage 
track at Jacksonburg. 

On July 25 brakeman F. M. Quinn observed 
a defective condition on a car on Carnegie 
Siding, Hastings, W. Va. 

On July 21 conductor G. E. Gatewood dis- 
covered a defective track condition in Benwood 
Yard, and promptly reported it to the section 
foreman, who made repairs. 




J. D. WINGATE 



JOHN CU1UUNDER 



CHARLES YOUNG 



62 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Operator F. Shivlin is commended for dis- 
covering a defective condition of equipment 
on a car in the train of extra east engine 2576, 
while passing DK Tower on July 5. 



Signal repairman D. J. McGinnis recently 
discovered a defective condition in the main 
track east of Shelby station. He promptly 
notified trackmen, who made repairs. 



Ohio River Division 



Connellsville Division 



On June 5 brakeman W. E. Moore, of Parkers- 
burgh High Yard, noticed a defective con- 
dition on one of the cars in train No. 96 while 
it was passing Belpre station. He boarded the 
caboose and notified the conductor, who had 
the car set off. Mr. Moore is commended for 
his prompt action. 

Cleveland Division 

On May 25, at Valley City, wreckmaster A. 
Smolik noticed that a N. Y. C. car was in a 
defective condition. He had the train crew set 
the car off for repairs. 

On June 23 J. M. Seeley, section foreman at 
Grafton, Ohio, discovered a defective con- 
dition on a car in train of extra west 4177, be- 
tween Lester and Erhart. The train was 
stopped and the car set off. He' is com- 
mended. 

On the night of June 26, while working near 
Dover, the following employes captured and 
tinned over to the police several men who 
were robbing our station: Engineer R. C. 
Vickers and brakemen F. Vasbinder, H. W. 
Kaiser, C. C. Croy and L. C. Murphy. They 
are all highly commended for their good 
work. 

Ai Dover, on July 2, conductor J. B. Cadden 
discovered a defective condition on one of our 
cars in train first No. 85. The car was 
set off. 

At Crystal Springs, on July 4, conductor C. 
A. Mann observed indications that a defective 
car bad passed over the westbound track. He 
promptly notified the dispatcher, who in- 
structed the crew of extra 4256 to examine their 
train. A defective condition was found to 
exist on one of the cars. Conductor Mann is 
commended. 




O. LATTANZI 



On June 18, engineer J. E. Baker and fireman 
W. P. Oliver, of extra 2658, discovered Bridge 
No. 25 afire at several places. They stopped 
and extinguished the 
flames. 

On July 12 O. Lat- 
tanzi, foreman at 
Hooversville, Pa., 
discovered and re- 
ported a defective 
condition on a car in 
train of extra 4119. 

On August 5 G. A. 
Cook, agent at Glen- 
coe, Pa., who was 
watching No. 94 pass 
there, discovered a 

defective condition on one of the cars. He 
telephoned to the operator in the tower 
about three quarters of a mile east of the 
station, who stopped the train. The defective 
car was set off for repairs. Superintendent 
Broughton has written to Mr. Cook, commend- 
ing him. 

Pittsburgh Division 

On the evening of June 25 a violent storm 
obstructed our tracks at Foxburg and did con- 
siderable other damage. Mrs. Harvey Bushey 
and Miss Alma Burchfield made their way 
t hrough the storm to the office of road foreman 
of engines D. B. Fawcett and informed him of 
the condition, and Messrs. Bushey, Burch- 
field and Howard L. Clipp assisted in clearing 
the track. 

Superintendent Brady has written to all 
these ladies and gentlemen, thanking them 
heartily for their services. They have the 

gratitude of the Company. 



Newark Division 

Bridge inspector T. A. Reagan recently 
discovered a defective condition in the main 
track Ureal of Butlef station, and promptly 
notified the trae|< foiemnn, who made repairs. 



Glenwood Shops 

On August 3 B. H. Rush noticed a car in 
train of engine 2502 with doors in had con- 
dition. He called Willow Grove <>n 'phone and 
had repairs made. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



63 



New Castle Division 

On the afternoon of July 17 operator N. H. 
Shriver, on his way home from work at FS 
Tower, discovered a defective track condition 
near Charlestown. He immediately reported 
the matter and had it corrected. A credit 
entry has been placed on his service record. 

Merwin Kerrick, pumper at Burton, recently 
discovered a defective track condition a quarter 
of a mile east of the Burton pump house, and 
made a special trip to notify the section foreman 
and to assist in making repairs. He is highly 
commended. 

Chicago Division 

On July 5, Clarence Minks, twelve years old, 
residing at Bairdstown, Ohio, discovered a 
defective track condition about one-quarter 
mile east of the station. He immediately 
notified our track foreman and necessary repairs 
were made. The young gentleman has been 
written a letter of commendation by superin- 
tendent Jackson. 

On June 10 conductor C. B. Babbitt found 
a defective track condition at Chicago Junction, 
Ohio. He made a report and repairs were 
made. On June 22 he discovered another 
defective track condition about one mile west 
of the siding at Hamler, and brakeman R. E. 
Potter was left to protect it. He is commended 
for discovering and reporting conditions. 

Brakeman H. B. Smith has been commended 
by Superintendent Jackson for discovering a 
defective condition in westbound main track 
at Tiffin, Ohio, on June 15. Mr. Smith re- 
mained at the point to protect trains and 
called section men to make repairs. 

Chicago Terminal 

On July 13 conductor Christ Peters dis- 
covered a defective condition in train of extra 
1970, pulling out of Barr yard. He notified 
conductor Freeman, who had car set off. Mr. 
Peters is commended for his good work. 

On July 6 switchman W. R. Teeple discov- 
ered evidence of a defective condition on engine 
1970, which had just passed. He notified State 
Line Tower and conductor Zimmerman made 
an inspection at Whiting Junction, which dis- 
closed the defective condition. Mr. Teeple is 
commended. 



Ohio Division 

On July 2, while train first No. 100 was 
passing Greenfield, track foreman J. E. Weaver 
noticed a defective condition on one of the cars. 
He immediately flagged the train and repairs 
were made. A credit entry has been placed 
upon his service record. 

Indiana Division 

Credit entries have been placed on the ser- 
vice records of conductor C. Bush and flagman 
C. E. Raeburn, of extra east 2852, and of engi- 
neer James McMamamon, fireman H. Kinney 
and flagman C. N. Anderson, of the North 
Vernon helper engine, for discovering and pro- 
tecting a defective track condition near North 
Vernon on July 13. 

On August 6 W. J. Gorman, agent at Moores 
Hill, discovered a defective condition on a car 
in train No. 81, and called the attention of the 
conductor to it. Repairs were made. A credit 
entry has been placed on Mr. Gorman's service 
record. 

Toledo Division 

On June 22 brakeman C. D. Chevis noticed 
a defective condition of equipment on train 
No. 54's engine at Lima. He promptly notified 
the conductor. He is commended for his 
interest in the Company's welfare. 

On the evening of July 9 conductor Perry 
Byers observed a defective condition of equip- 
ment on a car being handled by our transfer 
engine 414 at Cincinnati Junction. He is com- 
mended for his close observation and prompt 
action in reporting the condition. 

While acting as flagman with caboose 134 on 
April 28, brakeman Harry P. Baumer observed 
a defective condition of car in extra 4051, while 
the train was passing North Dayton. He 
promptly called the attention of_the crew, who 
set car out. 

Operator R. C. Manning was commended 
twice during the month of May. On the 11th 
he detected a defective condition in train extra 
north 4089, while passing Miamisburg station. 
On the 27th he noticed a defective condition of 
equipment in train south 4051, while passing 
his station. He took prompt action in both 
cases and the conditions were corrected. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYER MAGAZINE 



J. B. Kraph, operator at AK Tower, is 
commended for discovering a defective track 
condition at T. & O. ( \ crossing, Wapakoneta, 
on July 10. 

On April 20 conductor Alfred Taylor, train 
Xo. 98, observed bridge deck on bridge over 
New River Junction afire. He promptly took 
his engine back to Hamilton and extinguished 
the fire. He is commended. 

n 
□ 



J. P. Cristy, operator at Tontogany, noticed 
car door swinging in second eighty-seven on Ma y 
25, while the train was passing his station. 
He succeeded in having train stopped and the 
condil ion corrected. 

On July 18 engineer E. J. Burnes observed and 
repaired a defective switch condition at Fair- 
mont. A credit entry has been placed on his 
service record. 

imeQ □ 
mma □ 



1 1 




260 to 1 



See if you can beat it, and if you can write to our Editor and tell him 
j about it, and he will tell us. 

Of course you want to know 260 What to 1 What. Now that you 
are interested we are going to tell you. 260 letters to one sheet of carbon 
paper. This was done by one of your fellow employes. Who? Well never 
mind about that; it is up to you to beat it. If you are going to try we 

§ 

will let you in on part of the secret. 

g 

I 

Write as many letters as you can on half sheets, using a half sheet of 
carbon. Then after you use it as many times as you can multiply the 
number of letters by two and see how many you have for a full sheet of 
carbon. 

Keep only one sheet of carbon in commission and do not begin on 
another sheet until it has gone the limit. 

Move your carbon, turning it from top to bottom. This will help you 
to hit the high spots. 

Do not keep your carbon near the heat. This is liable to make it 
curl and make you mad. 

When you are not using your carbon keep it in a box, envelope or in 
some manner flat. 

By following these simple rules we believe you can beat this record. 

Try it! -//. 8. S. 



I ^ \ AMONG OURSELVES S ss 1 

i i i i 

■ ii nniiQ iiiininiimiiiic ■ inn a o a 11 o i u j o on iianm an out aim o a a o «* u nx-u. cwnnnimoumu'uiit ■ umiwi'iinniiram u wiii ra ■ 



Baltimore and Ohio Building 



General Offices 

Effective July 16 Adam Erdman was ap- 
pointed traveling coal freight agent, with 
headquarters at Baltimore, vice J. H. Hoffman, 
resigned to accept service elsewhere. 

On August 1 W. F. Julier, assistant ticket 
agent at Camden Station, was promoted to 
passenger agent in the City Department, in 
the Baltimore and Ohio building. 

Mr. Julier entered the service as a clerk in 
the master mechanic's office at Riverside on 
August 27, 1907. On April 19, 1909, he was trans- 
ferred to the ticket office at Camden station. 
The news of his recent promotion brought 
sincere pleasure to his many friends. 

Auditor Passenger Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, George Eichner 

The patriotism of our office force was further 
manifested when Robert L. Hooper volunteered 
for service in Company L, of the Fifth Infantry, 
M. N. G. Charles X. Xew has signed up to 
serve in the Second Company, Coast Artillerv, 
M. N. G. 

•LeRoy Fankhanel, formerly of this office, 
who enlisted in the Hospital Corps of the 
Fourth Maryland Infantry, has won an appoint- 
ment to the Medical Officers' Reserve Training 
Camp at Fort Oglethorpe. 

Miss Anna Schein and R. M. Billmeyer, of 
this office, were united in matrimony on June 23 



at St. Michael's and All Angels Protestant 
Episcopal Church. 
The young couple have our best wishes. 

The crops around Keyser, W. Va., are re- 
ported to be in first class condition by C. R. 
Purdy, who, accompanied by his wife, recently 
spent a few days with his uncle, Mr. Richard 
Purdy, of Abraham Ridge, Keyser, W. Va. 

Auditor Coal and Coke Receipts' Office 

Correspondent, John Limpert 

It is with the deepest regret that we report 
the death of J. F. Heine, Jr., the eight year old 
son of J. F. Heine, of this office. The sincere 
sympathy of all the clerks in this department 
is extended to Mr. Heine in his bereavement. 

C. C. Rettberg, head clerk of the Statistical 
Bureau, has returned to work after a furlough 
of nearly two months, necessitated by a nervous 
breakdown. 

Auditor Freight Claims* Office 

Correspondent, H. Irvixg Martin 

The war hero used to be "the man on horse- 
back." Now the foot soldier is the deciding 
factor. Even the editor of our Magazine, 
training for a commission, is loading up his gray 
matter with the tactics and drill of the infantry- 
man. 

In drab khaki we meet the foot soldier; 
every street gives us a glimpse of sturdy speci- 
mens. And the Freight Claim Department roll 
of honor grows. July added to it: W. H. 
Jackson, Third Company, Coast Artillery 
Corps, M. N. G.; W. A. Geraghty and C. f. 
Eimick, Battery B, Field Artillery, M. N. G. ; 

65 



66 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



R. F. Respess, Maryland Naval Militia, and 
W. R. MacCallum and W. E. Clark, Medical 
Corps. 

Anyone who stands for an hour at the portals 
of the Baltimore and Ohio building will see 
many of our boys in khaki passing in and out. 
Simply a salute to us, but the words: "All 
right, we're ready." 

It is but a thought, but have they not as they 
pass out through the great building's portals 
touched the latchstring of a new life? It is a 
step through the doorway of the arch of Freedom. 

What will come? A battle in the clouds, 
maybe. Another Lookout Moimtain of grim 
tenacity in the trenches. Tanks, aeroplanes, 
Zeppelins, Busy Berthas — all terms unknown 
a decade ago. Belgians, Huns, shot, shell, 
shrapnel — what does war mean to us in 
America? Merely a little Sherman-like hell 
for a few army corps. 

Like another Rip Van Winkle we sleep — but 
then the awakening ! 

The office poet asks me to remember that 
the Freight Claim Department is still here and 
thinking of bad freight handling, and asks that 
I dedicate this verse to the shipper: 
If against damage you'd insure, 
See that your freight is packed secure — 
Then in order to avoid delay — 
See that it's marked the proper way. 
All this brings us back to the thought that 
"freight is half way there when properly packed 
and correctly marked." 

Police Department 

On June 9 the employes of the Police Depart- 
ment presented to Frank L. Schepler, assistant 
to the auditor of freight claims, a solid gold 
watch and chain, appropriately engraved, as a 
reminder of their regard and of their regret at 
his severing his relations with the Police De- 
partment. Mr. Schepler was connected with 
our Police Department for nearly fifteen years, 
during which time he held a number of positions, 
his last being that of supervisor of police of 
the System. 

The resignation of Mr. Schepler brought a 
new man to Baltimore from the west, to fill the 
position of supervisor of police, the appointment 
being given W. E. Teubert, captain of police at 
Youngstown, Ohio, who succeeded Mr. Schepler 
OH May 16. Mr. Teubert has held every posi- 
t ion in the Police Department, including watch- 
man, patrolman, lieutenant and captain. 



New York Terminal 

Correspondent, FftBD B. KoHLEB, Clerk 
Pier 22 

Diviiiional Safety Committee 



\\. ]'. hi'.*.* Chairman, Assistant Terminal Agent 

A. L. Mi' BJSLhon Terminal Cashier 

J. J. BATH ..Freight Agent , I'mr 22, N. R. 

J.T. Gokmak ....Freight Agent, Pier 21, E. R. 

T. Kavanauoh Freight A Kent , 2'it h Street 

1 I Cr.itMsv Freight Agent, Pier 7, N. R. 

M I BnOfinOtH Freight Agent, St. George Lighterage 

' ' \. FUWM Freight Agent, St Geortre Transfer 

E.J. KUOB Freight Agent. I'ier 4, Wallabout 



Marine Department Members 
Permanent 

E. A. English Marine Supervisor, Chairman 

E. J. Kelly Assistant Marine Supervisor, Vice-Chairman 

E. Salisbury Lighterage Supervisor 

Rotating Members (appointed for three months) 

C. H. Kearney Tugboat Captain 

W. Cornell Tugboat Engineer 

\Y. Meade Tugboat Fireman 

M. Y. Groff Lighterage Runner 

E. Sodeberq Barge Captain 

Otto Olsen Gas Hoist Captain 

H. Peterson Steam Hoist Captain 

J. Hall Steam Hoist Engineer 

W alter Kell y Deckhand 

The two good-looking young gentlemen in 
the accompanying picture are the sons of R. M. 
Frey, traveling freight claim adjuster, with- 
headquarters at 295 Broadway. The boy on 
the left is Robert, five months old, and the 
other Gerard, threo years old. Mr. Frey is 
naturally mighty proud of these little Baltimore 
and Ohio men. 



Staten Island Rapid Transit 
Railway Company 

Correspondent, F. G. Nodocker, Superin- 
tendent's Office, St. George 




ROBERT AND GERARD FREY 
The MM of traveling freight agent R. M. Frey 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



07 



m 


z # 


\ mil 








*» ■ ' - . 

8S - . ' 







J 



THREE POPULAR STATEN ISLAND EMPLOYES 
Divisional Safety Committee 



H. R. Hanlin Chairman, Superintendent 

B. P. Kelly .Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

S. A. Turvey Secretary, Tiainmaster's and Marine Clerk 

H. W. Ordeman Division Engineer 

W. A. Deems Master Mechanic 

A. Conley Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. DeRevere Medical Examiner 

J. B. Sharp Agent, St. George Coal Piers 

F. W. Nolan Agent, St. George Transfer 

P. A. Witherspoox Track Supervisor 

W. L. Dryden Signal Supervisor 

J. F. McGowan Division Operator 

W. E. Connell Supervisor of Crossing Watchmen 

F. Peterson Division Agent 

R. F. Farlow Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members 

J. P. Miller Towerman 

T. F. Brennen Conductor 

G. McKinnon Machinist 

Harry Barry Foreman Painter 

A. L. Cummiskey Car Inspector 

Alvin Rauscher ..Transit man 

G. Hartman Engineer 

A. Nichols Fireman 

Joseph McDonald Signal Repairman 

H Owens Trainman 

B. F. Winant Agent, Port Richmond 

G. B. Stansbtjry Investigator, Representing Track Dep't 



The picture at top of column was taken at 
South Beach. Reading from left to right the 
gentlemen are: trainman Herbert Dougherty, 
conductor F. A. Holden, and trainman Harry 
Owens. 

J. T. McGovern, formerly chief clerk to the 
general traffic agent, has been appointed chief 
clerk to the general manager, vice L. C. Sauer- 
hammer transferred to vice-president Davis' 
office, in Baltimore. 

R. M. Norton, who was formerly rate clerk 
in the auditor's office, has joined the American 
Field Service, for service with our Allies across 
the seas. We shall probably hear from "Bob" 
as being "Somewhere in France" hereafter. 
William Berger, rate clerk in the office of the 
general traffic agent has filled his position. 

William J. Filedora, formerly a clerk in the 
auditor's office, has accepted a position as rate 
clerk in the general traffic agent's office. 

Agent Robert D. Gannon has accepted the 
position of general claim clerk in the general 
offices. 

General car foreman H. W. Miller spent his 
vacation with his family in West Virginia. 



Samuel R. Yerks has been promoted to travel- 
ing auditor, vice E. Decher, who has accepted 
Mr. Peterson's former position as division 
agent. 

Harry Lawrence, draftsman in the Mechanical 
Department, spent a pleasant vacation in the 
New England States, with his family. 

Carpenter Conrad Feist is to be complimented 
on a recent find in one of our cars which came 
from Baltimore. While making some repairs 
he came across a box full of silverware that had 
been left by someone for safe keeping. He 
immediately reported the find to master 
mechanic Deems. 

There was considerable rivalry among the 
different shop departments as to which one 
would contribute the highest proportion of 
Liberty Loan Bond purchasers. The boiler 
shop, of which Peter F. Gallagher is foreman, 
came out victorious, ninety-eight per oent. of 
that department subscribing. Much credit is 
due Mr. Gallagher. 

Engineer John J. Hani on recently journeyed 
to Detroit, making stops at important points 
along the line and not overlooking Niagara 
Falls. 

John J. McCabe, piecework inspector, has 
recently been made general piecework inspector 
at Newark shops. The well wishes of his 
many friends here are extended to him in his 
new w r ork. 

William Richards, clerk in the master 
mechanic's office, recently paid a visit to 
Washington, D. C, in company with machinist's 
helper A. Gabriel. 

The accompanying picture is of three women 
car cleaners, taken on the platform (tracks 
7 and 8) of East Shore Terminal, St. George. 
The names of those in the picture are as follows : 
Grace McDermott, Katherine McGuire, Anna 
McGrath and foreman Charles Newert. 




WOMEN "DOING THEIR BIT" AS 
CAR CLEANERS 



68 THE BALTIMORE AND O] 

We are pleased to hear that "Jess" Gover has 
received his commission in the Engineer 
Officers' Reserve Corps. 

Clifton P. Phipps, assistant timekeeper in 
the C. T. Department, has been promoted to 
timekeeper in the Engineering Department, 
vice A. N. Stuhl, furloughed because of military 
duties. 

W. E. Pettigrew, field engineer, Engineering 
Department, has been transferred to the posi- 
tion of abstracter in the Valuation Department. 

Conductor D. B. Hayes, who has been in the 
service of the Company as conductor of the 
P. A. Division for twenty-nine years, is taking 
a trip through the New England States on his 
vacation. 

"Carl" (as he was known) Anderson, one of 
the most popular boys of the Staten Island 
Rapid Transit Railroad and a prominent 
member of the Staten Island Railroad Club, 
has enlisted in the service of Uncle Sam, in a 
railroad regiment. When the turmoil of war 
has passed and victory is won, we hope to see 
"Carl" with a few medals for bravery. 

On July 6, at the Staten Island Railroad 
Club, a local Veterans' Association was organ- 
ized, with the following officers: B. F. Kelly, 
trainmaster, president; F. H. Brant, conductor, 
vice-president ; William Darnell, engineer, secre- 
tary; Philip Reilly, engineer, treasurer. Execu- 
tive committee: B. F. Fithian, agent; M. J. 
Hanlon, engineer; W. L. Dryden, signal super- 
visor; George Ford, Sr., engineer and J. Nichols, 
conductor. W. H. Averell, H. R. Hanlin and 
S. A. Turvey were elected honorary members. 
By the time of the next meeting the association 
hopes to have quite a few members. 

A Freight Claim Prevention Bureau has been 
established on this Division. The members 
are as follows: B. F. Kelly, chairman; A. J. 
Volpi, assistant yardmaster; J. J. Bayer, agent; 
J. H. Lamberson, lieutenant of police; Philip 
Helt, car repairer foreman and R. F. Frey, 
traveling freight claim agent. A meeting was 
held at Pier 6, on July 10. Messrs. Glessner 
and Schepler from Baltimore attended and 
gave the new committeemen a "line" on their 
work. 

On the afternoon and evening of July 14 the 
Staten Island Railroad Club, of Livingston, 
8. I., held its Second Annual Picnic and Field 
Day, at Munger's Park (on-the-beach), New 
Dorp, S. I. There was prize bowling, prize 
dancing, prize athletic events, boating, bathing 
and good music. In the afternoon there was a 
baseball game between the New York and 
Baltimore Divisions of the System League, 
Baltimore winning by a score of 8 to 5. Music 
was furnished by Professor Wyatt's famous 
band of eight pieces. All present had a very 
enjoyable time. 

On July 4 the passenger travel on this division 
was very heavy. On the P. A. Division 



O EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 

seventy-eight trains were run, on the East 
Shore two hundred and three trains, and on the 
North Shore one hundred and nineteen trains. 
Thirty-two train crews, twenty-one engines, 
and ninety-eight cars were in service. There 
were no accidents. All operating officials and 
employes are commended for such a good 
performance, especially the men in charge of the 
movements at the East Shore Terminal. At 
one period seventeen trains were handled in 
twenty-two minutes. 

The employes of the Marine Department 
express their sympathy for Harry Flood, 
mate of the tug "F. D. Underwood," in the loss 
of his father, who died on June 23. Mr. Flood's 
father had followed the water for the last 
fifty years. 



Philadelphia Division 

Correspondent, J. C. Richardson, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 



R. B. White Chairman, Superintendent 

W. T. R. Hoddinott Vice-Chair man, Trainmaster 

T. Bloecher Division Engineer 

J. P. Hines Master Mechanic 

J. E. Sentman Road Foreman of Engines 

H. K. Hartman Chief Train Dispatcher 

T. B. Franklin Terminal Agent 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police, effective August 1 

F. H. Lamb Division Claim Agent 

Dr. C. W. Pence Medical Examiner 

J. T. Miller Road Engineer 

M. F. Goodnight Road Fireman 

A. P. Offutt Road Conductor 

H. A. Gallagher Yard Conductor 

W. E. Warden Tender Inspector 

J. J. Ward Car Inspector 

W. M. Devlin Secretary, effective August 15 



Effective July 15 John Edwards, Jr., was 
appointed assistant division engineer, vice 
R. C. Slocomb, transferred to the Baltimore 
Division. 

Effective July 28 Thomas Lower was 
appointed freight and ticket agent at Joppa, 
Md., vice R. T. Bartlett, transferred to the 
Telegraph Department. 

Effective June 25 W. E. Guyton was 
appointed ticket agent at Chester, vice R. E. 
Groves, resigned. 

On July 1 W. A. Calloway was appointed 
freight and ticket agent at Collingdale, vice 
I. E. White, resigned. 

J. M. Hill was appointed freight and ticket 
agent at Yorklyn, Delaware, on July 16, vice 
\. Gorrell, who has been appointed freight 
and ticket agent at Aberdeen, Md., vice W. H. 
Rcasin, transferred to the Telegraph Depart- 
ment. 

Ray Murray, file clerk in the superintendent \s 
office, has enlisted in the navy. 

Effective June 15 E. E. Ramey was appointed 
assistant terminal trainmaster at Philadelphia. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 




MRS. GEORGE W. GALLOWAY 



Baltimore Division 

Correspondent, J. B. Moriarity, Superintendent 1 s 
Office, Camden Station 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. B. Gorsuch .Chairman, Superintendent 

R. A. Grammes. . . . Yice-Chairman, Assistant Superintendent 

Y. M. C. A. Department 

T. E. Stacy Secretary, Riverside 

E. K. Smith Secretary, Washington 

C. H. Winslow Secretary, Brunswick 

Relief Department 

Dr. E. H. Mathers Medical Examiner, Camden Station 

Dr. J. A. Robb Medical Examiner, Washington 

Dr. J. F. Ward Medical Examiner, Winchester, Va. 

Transportation Department 
S. A. Jordan Assistant Superintendent, Brunswick, Md. 

C. A. Mewshaw Trainmaster, Camden Station 

E. E. Hurlock. Division Operator, Camden Station 

E. C. Shipley Road Foreman of Engines, Riverside 

J.J. McCabe . Trainmaster and Road Foreman, Harrisonburg 
W. T. Moore Agent, Locust Point 

D. M. Fisher Agent, Washington 

W. E. Shannon Agent, Brunswick, Md. 

W. E. Nellson AgeDt, Camden Station 

C. C. Bastain Freight Conductor, Riverside 

W. F. Moody Freight Engineer, Riverside 

J. B. McGovern Freight Fireman, Riverside 

H. B. Bohanon Yard Conductor, Mount Claie 

R. L>. Banks Divisional Claim Agent, Baltimore, Md. 

J. M. Powell Captain of Police, Camden Station 

Maintenance of Way Department 

H. M. Church Division Engineer, Camden Station 

S. C. Tanner Master Carpenter, Camden Station 

C. A. Thompson Signal Supervisor, Camden Station 

J. Flanagan General Foreman, Locust Point 

L. C. Bowers Supervisor, Camden Station 

E. D. Calvert Supervisor, Winchester, Va. 

W. E. Poole Section Foreman, Gait hers, Md. 

J. M. Gross Carpenter Foreman, Staunton, Va. 

E. C. Hobbs Signal Repairman, Gaithers, Md. 

Motive Power Department 
T. F. Perkinson Master Mechanic, Riverside 

G. B. Williamson General Car Foreman, Riverside 

T. O'Leary Car Foreman, Washington 

H. S. Ely Clerk to Car Foreman, Camden Station 

G. N. Hammond Material Distributer, Locust Point 

F. C. Schorndorfeh General Foreman, Brunswick, Md. 

G. B. Dinges Clerk to Car Foreman, Brunswick, Md. 

C. F. Serp Machinist Apprentice, Riverside, Md. 



The accompanying picture is of Mrs. George 
W- Galloway, the president of the Ladies' 
Auxiliary of the Baltimore Division Veterans' 
Association. 

The accompanying picture is of the rose 
garden of engineer T. E. Lugenbeel, at his 
home at 31 East Heath Street, Baltimore. 
This garden, for the last two years, has won the 
prize offered for the best rose garden in the 
city and Mr. Lugenbeel is trying for it again this 
year. He will be glad to have anyone inter- 
ested in the cultivation of these beautiful 
flowers call on him and inspect the garden. 



Washington Terminal 

Correspondent, G. H. Winslow, Secretary 
Y. M. C. A. 

Divisional Safety Committee 



G. H. Winslow Chairman, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 

Dr. P. H. Steltz Medical Examiner, Sanitary Inspector 

Motive Power Department 

G. W. Kiehm Air Brake Supervisor 

W. M. Grant Boiler Foreman 

H. A. Bright Gang Leader 

C. J. Ayers Gang Leader 

A. F. K re glow Storekeeper 

T. E. Croson Yard Engine Dispatcher 

N. Tippet Foreman, Car Shop 

H. A. Barefield Assistant Foreman 

A. A. Pace Foreman, Station 

G. F. Mergell Foreman of Electricians 

J.J. Desmond Gang Leader 

G. V .ale n tine Yard Engine Dispatcher 

B. Howard Assistant Foreman 

R. Heindrich Foreman, Station 

Transportation Department 

J. McCatjley Assistant Yardmaster 

L. T. Keane Conductor 

E. M. Farmer Conductor 




ENGINEER T. E. LUGENBEEL'S 
ROSE GARDEN 



70 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Maintenance of Way Department 

\V. M. Cardwell Master Carpenter 

F. W. Hodges Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

H L. Bell Foreman, Carpenter Shop 

A M. Brady Track Foreman 

J. T. Umbaugh Track Foreman 

P. C. Rick MAN Signal Maintainer 

H. R. Callahan Signal Foreman 

The Ninth Annual Meeting of the Terminal 
Railroad Y. M. C. A., of Washington, D. C, 
was held in the gymnasium at Union Station on 
June 27. 

The meeting was well attended, there being 
between three and four himdred members and 
friends of the association present. 

The reports of the officers showed the asso- 
ciation to be in a flourishing condition. The 
secretary's report indicated a fine increase in 
membership, while those of the treasurer and 
of the audit committee showed the splendid 
manner in which the finances have been handled 
during the past year, the balance on hand being 
nearly double that of the previous year. 

Great credit is due secretary George H. 
Winslow and his corps of efficient assistants 
for the success that has attended their efforts 
to bring the association to its present excellent 
standing. 

After the reading of the reports the meeting 
became one large enthusiastic patriotic gather- 
ing. Addresses were delivered by superinten- 
dent W. J. Wilson, of the Washington Terminal 
Co., and Mr. G. V. Hibbard, associate general 
secretary of the International Committee of 
Y. M. C. A.'s. Mr. Wilson called attention to 
the duties devolving upon railroad men in the 
present crisis, urging all to be willing to "do 
their bit, ' and laying great stress upon the 
desirability of each one purchasing a Liberty 



Bond. Mr. Hibbard, in the address of the 
evening, illustrated in detail the wonderful 
work that has been, and is still being accom- 
plished by the Y. M. C. A. on the French battle 
front, giving those present a most interesting 
account of his personal experiences during the 
past year among the unfortunate victims of 
the great war, and telling of the immense 
amount of comfort and sunshine that has been 
brought into the afflicted families by the 
energetic and faithful Y. M. C. A. workers. 
This address was received with hearty applause 
and everyone present felt deeply thankful that 
our beloved country has thus far been spared 
the horrors of the European battle fronts. 

A fine musical program was given. The 
R. R. Y. M. C. A. Orchestra, under the direc- 
tion of C. W. Guest, played several selectiors 
in their usual delightful manner, receiving the 
applause that their performance well merited. 
The Musurgia Quartette, a local quartette of 
high class vocalists, added to the enjoyment 
of the evening with well-knowns elections from 
the grand operas. 

The audience, too, was called upon to "do its 
bit" for the general good, and the rafters rang 
when all present joined in singing "Columbia, 
the Gem of the Ocean," the "Star Spangled 
Banner" and "America!" 

At the conclusion of the entertainment every- 
one formed in line to partake of a buffet 
luncheon that had been prepared by the ladies 
of the Red Cross Units that meet in Union 
Station, and from the appearance of the tables 
after the line had passed by it was evident that 
the "Feast of Reason and Flow of Soul" of the 
earlier part of the evening had not impaired 
the appetites for the more substantial requisites 
of the inner man. Many words of appreciation 




ii w .( il MEETING OF THE WASHINGTON, T). C, TERMINAL Y. M. C A. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



of the work done by the ladies were forthcom- 
ing, and everyone wended his way home with 
a better feeling toward his fellow man, and a 
knowledge that the evening had been most 
profitably and pleasantly spent. 

The picture on page 70 was taken during 
the performance and shows the familiar faces 
of many men well known in railroading in 
Washington. 

• The old saying is, "You can't keep a good man 
down," nor can you keep good men down. 
This was proved conclusively on August 1, 
when one himdred and sixty-five men met for 
the purpose of forming a company of the Home 
Defense League Rifles. These men were all 
members of the Terminal Railroad Y. M. C. A., 
or employes of railroad companies. The 
meeting was held in the social room of the 
association and the secretary of the association 
presided at the meeting. 

Colonel M. A. Winter, commander of the 
Rifles, assisted by Major and Lieutenant Colonel 
Hazelton, presented the proposition to the men. 
Sixty-five signed application blanks that 
evening and more are coming in every day. 
It is expected that a good company will be 
formed and the men expect to start drilling at 
an early date. Mr. W T ilson, superintendent of 
the Washington Terminal Company, also made 
an address and later signed a blank, as did a 
number of the department heads. 

Young men among our membership are con- 
tinually enlisting or being called to the colors 
and from the reports which come back they 
are giving good accounts of themselves. We 
are especially pleased to mention that Milton 
Whitney, who has been a member of this asso- 
ciation for a number of years, has been com- 
missioned a lieutenant in the army, having 
passed a satisfactory examination after the 
training for Reserve Officers at the Fort Myer 
camp. Most of the boys are in camp around 
the city and expect to leave for southern camps 
in the near future. 

We are glad to annoimce the renovation of 
the shower baths and the installation of new 
shower bath attachments. This will greatly 
increase the pleasure and facility of taking 
shower baths and it is expected that the baths 
will be increasingly used in the future. 

After a somewhat extended period the Base- 
ball League has arranged a championship 
schedule of five games, between the Shops 
and General Office teams. The winner of this 
series will be the title holder for the Terminal 
Railroad Y. M. C. A. Baseball League, and a 
contender for the city championship in a post 
season series which is under consideration by 
.the Amateur Baseball Association. 

T. J. Bridges, formerly assistant secretary 
at Staunton, Va., joined our force as night 
assistant secretary on July 17. Mr. Bridges 
is a genial fellow and a willing worker and is 
making good progress with the men of our 
membership. Mr. Rose, who previously filled 
the position of night assistant, has been placed 



71 

on day duty and will pay special attention to 
the membership work of the association. We 
wish both these men success, and if their per- 
formance of duty so far is any criterion, we are 
sure they will attain it. 

The physical director, W. W. Tenney, 
attended the Association Summer School at 
Blue Ridge, N. C, being graduated from the 
Physical Institute. Two weeks of hard work and 
study interspersed with some good jolly social 
affairs made the time spent at the school very 
profitable. 

A number of new text books have been added 
to the library, including books on English and 
Mathematics. 



Washington, D. C, Freight Station 

Correspondent, W. L. Whiting. Chief Clerk 

At sunrise on July 4, a patriotic gathering 
was held at the yardmaster's office at this 
station, the occasion being a flag raising. Old 
Glory was hoisted while a member of the 
United States Marine Corps, G. W. Hockney, 
played the inspiring strains of the "Star 
Spangled Banner." Short addresses were made 
by yardmaster R. F. Gaither. assistant train- 
master C. E. Ownes and conductor G. L. 
Latham. 

An instructive and interesting lecture was 
given at this station on June 25 by Dr. E. S. 
Green, of the American Red Cross, on the 
subject of "First Aid to the Injured." Be- 
tween eighty and ninety employes were in 
attendance and profited by the doctor's in- 
structions. He delivered the same lecture at 
the Washington Terminal the next day. 

Cashier Stillwell is still on the sick list, 
although we are glad to be able to report im- 
provement in his condition. 

Foreman carpenter J. S. Schell, who has been 
laid up with rheumatism for several weeks, is 
able to be about again. 



Mount Clare Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Morgan, Secretary 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

L. Finegan Chairman, Superintendent of Shops 

E. P. Poole Vice Chairman, Asst. Supt. of Shops 

W. L. Morgan Secretary, Secretary to Supt. of Shops 

J . Howe General Foreman 

H. A. Beaumont General Car Foreman 

G. H. Kapinos Supervisor of Shop Machinery and Tools 

Dr. F. H. Digges Assistant Medical Examiner 

A. G. Cavedo Machinist, Erecting Shop 

W. L. Childs Boilermaker, Boiler Shop 

J. R. Frothingham Machinist, No. 1 Machine Shop 

W. W. Wilkeson Machine Operator, No. 2 Machine Shop 

B. F. Douglass, Jr Pipe Fitter, Pipe and Tin Shop 

W. C. Duvall. . . .Coremaker, Foundries and Re-rolling Mill 
L. E. Blank Machine Operator, Blacksmith Shop 

and Flue Plant 

W. Schmoll. Machine Operator, Bolt and Forge Shop 

L. A. Hinzerberger Machine Operator, Air Brake Shop 



72 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



J. J. Keogh Patternmaker Apprentice, Pattern Shop 

O. F. Doyle Machinist, Steel Car Plant and 

No. 3 Machine Shop 

B. F. Coox Tender Repairman, Tender and 

Tender Plant Shop 

P. O'Brien Machine Operator, Axle Shop and 

Power Plant 

F. J. Sobens Material Man, Freight Car Track 

J. V. Guxtz Car Builder, Passenger Car Erecting Shop 

G. Allenbaugh Upholsterer, Upholstering, 

Passenger Car, Paint and Finishing Shops 

W. Snyder Carpenter, Saw Mill and Cabinet Shop 

G. Schueffle. . . .Material Distributer, 1st Floor Storehouse 



Saturday, Juty 28, was a red-letter day for 
the employes of the Printing Department at 
Mt. Clare, of which George R. L. Leilich is 
manager. Like the other departments at Mt. 
Clare they desired to show their patriotism 
and love of country by contributing, indi- 
vidually, to a fund for the purchase of a flag, 
ten by eighteen feet, to float over their build- 
ing at Pratt and Poppleton Streets, to proclaim 
to all peoples and all nations that the Stars and 
Stripes will make them free, on the land and 
on the sea. 

It is fitting, too, that "Old Glory" should be 
here, for near this spot the first Morse tele- 
graphic message was received over the wires 
from Washington — "What hath God wrought" 
— and here is also located the first freight and 
passenger railroad station in the world. 

Our Mt. Clare band, under the direction of 
H. H. Freeman, opened the exercises with a 
stirring march, after which the Rev. H. P. 
Jackson offered the invocation, which was an 
inspiring and beautiful plea for guidance and 
protection. Charles J. Lehmen, chairman of 
the committee, then introduced the Hon. 




THE PRINTING SHOP WAS OA YLY BEDECKED 

ion THE i lac; raising 

f'hnfn i>v c. E. Aim 



Oregon Milton Dennis, who delivered an elo- 
quent address, filled with patriotic sentiments, 
which aroused great enthusiasm among the 
large audience present. 

At the conclusion of the address the beautiful 
flag was unfurled to the breeze, not to come 
down until peace has been declared and autoc- 
racy has given way to democracy, and the 
banner of freedom in triumph shall wave oven- 
all lands, bringing with it peace, prosperity 
and happiness. 

An incident connected with the raising of 
the flag that should be a lesson to all those 
of foreign birth who are not in sympathy with 
this coimtry was the arrest of a Greek, who is 
reported to have shouted "To hell with that 
flag." He was roughly handled by some of the 
audience and taken to the station-house, where 
he was fined heavily and sentenced to two 
months in jail, in which to learn to respect the 
flag and the country which has been a haven 
of rest to so many of his kind. 

The building was decorated in an appropriate 
manner by Albert Carmin. The other mem- 
bers of the committee were Samuel J. Girvin. 
foreman, Anthony F. Meisenhalter, Daniel L. 
Miller and Daniel C. Aker. 

When occasion calls the employes at Mount 
Clare are certainly not slow in showing their 
patriotism. This was evidenced by the recent 
Red Cross campaign carried on in the shops 
when $353.70 was raised for that work. The 
Misses Mildred Goetzinger and Helen Davis 
should be congratulated on their fine work 
in raising the sum they did for this cause; 
they were dressed as Red Cross nurses and 
worked very hard. Mount Clare also figured 
in the Red Cross parade in Baltimore recently, 
having an automobile float which showed the 
good decorative taste of those who had this 
work in charge — H. A. Beaumont,. W. Kern, 
J. D. Wright and G. A. Tschudy. On this 
float the two young ladies above mentioned 
represented Red Cross nurses, Dr. Digges an 
army physician and A. I. Amass a wounded 
soldier. 

Several changes have been made in the ofh< •<> 
force of the superintendent of shops: J. E. Riley, 
stenographer to the chief clerk, has been pro- 
moted to the office of John T. Broderick, super- 
visor of special bureaus, in the Baltimore and 
Ohio building, and has been succeeded by Miss 
Mildred Goetzinger. Miss M. Bercowitz and 
J. B. Carroll have also accepted positions m 
tins office. L. A. Mogart has been appointed 
chief clerk to general car foreman, vice J. II. 
Grace, transferred. Miss Helen Davis has 
been appointed telephone operator al Mount 
Clare, Vice Miss Marie Flaherty, promoted to 
t l,c ..dice of Mr. Paullis. 

Walter Severns has been appointed chief 
clerk to accountant II. T. Beck. lie was pro* 
moted from the office of the division accountant, 
( ). B. Street. We all like Mi-. Severns and are 
glad ( Iki I he h;is come 1 o Mount ( 'tare. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



73 



The accompanying 
picture is of J. S. 
Russum formerly 
employed in the 
cabinet shop at 
Mount Clare, who 
enlisted in the navy 
last April. He is 
now stationed on 
the_U. S. S. Petrel. 

A thrilling duck- 
pin match was rolled 
on the Columbia 
Alleys on July 20, 
witnessed by a large 
and enthusiastic 
crowd from Mount Clare. The office of the 
accountant downed the No. 2 machine shop 
team by taking three games out of five. 
Baker's praiseworthy individual work was 
instrumental in bringing victory to his team. 
His high score was 135, and he registered 541 
for five games. Ryan bowled best for the 
losers. The score follows: 



J. S. RUSSUM 



Office of Accountant 



Baker 112 

Whelan. ... 85 
Beck 93 



90 
99 
91 



135 
90 



98 106 
97 112 
97 100 



Total.... 290 280 321 292 318 1501 

No. 2 Machine Shop 

Carey 104 98 78 79 103 

Ryan 86 110 134 102 87 

Bloomfield, 94 93 122 103 92 



Total.... 284 301 334 284 282 1485 

H. L. Taylor, gang foreman in No. 1 machine 
shop, in charge of the bolt gang, has recently 
become a benedict, having been married on 
June 20 to Miss Annie M. How. They spent 
their honeymoon in Atlantic City. We all 
wish our friend Taylor the greatest of happi- 
ness. 

W. M. Krieb, stenographer to accountant 
H. T. Beck, recently left the service to take 
a position with the Dreadnaught Rubber Com- 
pany of Baltimore. Young Kricb is an ambi- 
tious chap and we predict for him a bright 
future. 

Several enthusiastic flag raising ceremonies 
have recently been held at Mount Clare. The 
foundries held their flag raising on June 30; 
the blacksmith shop on July 7 and the passen- 
ger car erecting shop on July 14. A great num- 
ber of employes and their friends were present 
at each of the ceremonies, which were very 
impressive. 

W. Dahlman has been appointed electrician 
foreman at Mount Clare, vice W. G. O'Donnell, 
transferred to Baileys. 

R. H. Murphy, clerk in the car foreman's 
office, has been furloughed for military duty. 
Mr. Murphy was a great baseball enthusiast 
and we will miss him very much. 



Cumberland Division 

Correspondents 
E. Q. Drawbaugh, Division Operator 
Thomas R. Rees, Secretary to Superintendent 
W. C. Montignani, Secretary, Y. M. C. A. 
C. L. Kalbaugh, Chief Clerk to Master Mechanic 

Divisional Safety Committee 

G. D. Brooke Chairman, Superintendent 

J. W. Deneen Vice-Chairman, Asst. Supt., East End 

T. R. Rees Secretary 

E. P. Welshonce .Trainmaster, West End 

E. C. Groves Trainmaster, East End 

L. J. Wilmoth Road Foreman, East End 

M. A. Carney Road Foreman, West End 

F. F. Hanley Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

R. B. Stout Assistant Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbatjgh Division Operator 

Dr. J. A. Dorner Medical Examiner 

Dr. F. H. D. Biser Medical Examiner 

Dr. L. D. JJorris Medical Examiner 

G. R. Bramble Freight Agent 

W. D. Strouse Joint Agent 

E. E. Dean Car Foreman, East End 

W. T. Davis Car Foreman, West End 

F. L. Leyh Storekeeper 

W. M. Hinkey Storekeeper 

W. S. Harig Division Claim Agent 

J. Z. Terrell Freight and Ticket Agent 

I. S. Sponseller General Supervisor 

H. D. Schmidt Captain of Police 

F. A. Taylor Master Carpenter 

W. L. Stevens Shop Clerk 

W. C. Montignani. Secretary, Balto. and Ohio Y. M. C. A. 
A. L. Brown. . . .Assistant Master Mechanic, Keyser, W. Va. 

Rotating Members 

J. R. Reckley Freight Engineer 

O. E. Pace Fi eight Fireman 

J. W. McMackin Freight Conductor 

H. H. Barley Yard Brakeman 

J. C. Defibaugh Machinist 

R. L. Fields Car Inspector 

J. C. Snyder Operator 




TRACK FOREMAN G. J. McKENZIE 



74 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



Baltimore and Ohio Athletic Association of 
Cumberland, Md. 



President 

Griffin A. McGinn Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Vice-Presidents 

F. F. Han-ley Division Engineer 

Pi. B. Stout Master Mechanic 

E. C. Drawbaugh Division Operator 

D. H. Street Division Freight Agent 

\Y. H. Linn General Yardmaster 

Treasurer 

G. R. Bramble Freigth Agent 

Secretary 

T. F. Shaffer Chief Clerk to Division Engineer 



The picture on page 73 of G. J. McKenzie, 
of McKenzie Md., illustrates the type of men 
in charge of maintenance of track on the Cum- 
berland Division. 

Air. McKenzie entered the Baltimore and 
Ohio service on April 15, 1877, and has been 
employed continuously since that date. 

The fine condition of his section shows that 
he takes deep interest in his work, and his care 
of Company's property can be no better illus- 
trated than by the fact that he has used two 
Barrett No. 1 jacks for twenty years, without 
the necessity of repairs excepting the renewal 
of jaws. This is a remarkable record in the 
care and conservation of tools and indicates 
what can be accomplished when a foreman 1 akes 
pride in the appliances placed under his charge. 

Air. and Mrs. McKenzie have a family of ten 
children, nine of whom are living, three being 
in the service of the Company. 

The accompanying picture is of Miss Mary 
White, who operates a drill press in the Air 
Brake Department at Cumberland. Miss White 
is doing splendid work and has proved herself 
to be a most efficient employe. 




MISS MARY WHITE 
Drill I'n-MH Operator in the Air Brake Department 
ut < utnherland 




W. E. FAZENBAKER 



Keyser 

The accompanying picture is of W. E. Fazen- 
baker, a pensioned veteran of Baltimore and 
Ohio service. 

Mr. Fazenbaker, who was born on February 
20, 1847, entered our service in 1864 and learned 
the machinist's trade. He later became a 
fireman and was promoted to engineer on May 
7, 1873, and made his first trip on engine No. 106, 
on June 1 of that year. In April, 1885, he was 
assigned to regular passenger service, where 
he remained until his retirement on May 7, 1914. 

Mr. Fazenbaker has three sons who, like 
their father, are faithful Baltimore and Ohio 
men. They are G. W. Fazenbaker, machinist 
in Cumberland shop; O. S. W. Fazenbaker clerk 
to trainmaster and road foreman of engines at 
Keyser, and R. E. Fazenbaker, engineer on the 
Hampshire Southern Branch. He also has two 
daughters. Mrs. Fazenbaker, to whom he was 
married on September 3, 1867, died on March 
29, 1909 and, of course, has been greatly missed 
by Mr. Fazenbaker and his children. Al- 
though he is now in his seventies he enjoys 
good health, which his fellow employes wish 
may continue for many years to come. 

South Cumberland Y. M. C. A. 

The many friends of J. W. Deneen rejoice 
in his well-merited promotion, and wish him 
a bright railroad future. 

Despite the warm weather, the men at the 
shops, by unanimous vote, decided to continue 
the noon hour shop meetings throughout the 
summer. This matter was put squarely up 
to the men and left entirely in their hands, 
and the fact that there was no voice against 
continuing the meetings during the summer is 
a testimonial that they are appreciated by the 
men. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



i 5 



Martinsburg Shops 

Correspondent, W. L. Stephens 

■ Born to Mr. and Mrs. John McNamee, a son 
and daughter. Mr. McNamee is a machine 
hand in the frog shop. 

The names of Samuel M. Rockwell and 
Edgar Jackson Schael were drawn in the selec- 
tive draft to help fill Berkeley County's quota 
of 122. In the second list of 122 names were 
those of George James Brantner, Charles N. 
Licklider and Jacob Wolford. William Wright, 
steam shovel man at the local shops but regis- 
tered at his home county seat, Leesburg, Va., 
was drawn in the first call. He is just recover- 
ing from an operation for appendicitis but will 
do his duty if the doctors pass him. Others of 
the shop force were drawn, but their names 
were so far down on the list that it seems im- 
probable that they will be called for service in 
the first national army of 500,000 men. 

"Chris". Dailey, local shop craneman, has been 
sent to one of our western divisions to crane a 

steam shovel. Machinists Harrison and 

are inconsolable at the loss of their bosom 
friend and guide on many pleasure excursions. 
Never mind, boys, ''Chris" will be back by and 
by, with weird tales of victories won in the 
trenches of Indiana. 

The sympathy of the shop boys is extended to 
our fellow worker, Charles Hollis, in the death 
of his aged mother, Mrs. Eliza Francis Hollis, 
which occurred on July 9, in her home in this 
city. Mrs. Hollis, who was seventy-five years 
old, was a native of Martinsburg and spent her 
entire life here. The funeral was held at her 
late home on July 11, the Reverend R. L. 
Wright officiating. Interment was in Green 
Hill Cemetery. 




MISS GRACE BROWN, SHOP CLERK, AND 
MISS EVA MAY, M. C. B. CLERK 
Women employes at Fairmont 




R. L. HAMME AND G. M. MOORE 



Monongah Division 

Correspondents 

E. S. Jenkins, Secretary to Division Engineer, 
Grafton 

R. F. Haney, Conductor, Weston 
C. F. Schroder, Operator, Grafton 
J. Lynch, Car Inspector, Fairmont 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. M. Scott Chairman, Superintendent, Graiton, VI . Ya. 

J. A. Anderson Master Mechanic, Graiton, W. Va. 

W. I. Rowland Road Foreman, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. F. Eberly Division Engineer, Grafton, W. Ya. 

H. L. Miller Car Foreman, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. O. Martin Division Claim Agent, Clarksburg, W. Ya. 

Dr. C. A. Sinsel Medical Examiner, Grafton, W. Ya. 

P. B. Phinney Agent, Grafton, W. Ya. 

J. D. Anthony Agent, Fairmont, W. Va. 

S. H. Wells Agent, Clarksburg, W. Ya. 

R. L. Schill Agent, Weston, W. Ya. 

E. J. Hoover Agent, Buckhannon, W. Ya. 

F. W. Tutt Secretary, Chief Clerk to Division 

Engineer, Grafton, W. Ya. 

Rotating Members 

L. W. Grapes Fireman, Fairmont, W. Ya. 

D. R. Ridenour Machinist, Grafton, W. Va. 

J. Pickens Brakeman, Grafton, W. Ya. 

A. L. Ltjnsford Engineer, Weston, W. Ya. 

G. W. Binnix. Car Inspector, Fairmont, W. Ya. 

J. W. Hostler Engineer, Grafton, W. Ya. 

W. P. Kincaid Locomotive Inspector, Fairmont, W. Ya. 



The picture at top of column is of two very 
prominent railroaders — R. L. Hamme, travel- 
ing freight agent, and George M. Moore, ticket 
agent at Huntington. These gentlemen do not 
need any introduction to our employes, as they 
are very popular. Mr. Moore has been ticket 
agent at Huntington for a number of yeais and 



76 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



has the reputation of being most courteous and 
efficient. Mr. Hamme is known all over the 
System, and is very popular among his co- 
workers. 

Miss H. C. England has accepted the position 
of stenographer to the general foreman, at 
Somerset. We want to bid her welcome to the 
Baltimore and Ohio System. 

Brakeman J. S. Deas, Jr., has resumed duty, 
after being awaj r for several weeks because of 
illness. Glad to see you back, "Jim." 

Operator B. C. Bowers resumed duty at 
Adams on July 16, having been on a leave of 
absence for several months. How's the movies, 
"Bert?" 

G. D. Motter, statement clerk in the Motive 
Power Department, has been appointed super- 
visor of fuel loading, with headquarters at 
Chillicothe, Ohio. 

On July 14 Dr. E. H. Douglass, Company 
surgeon at Petroleum, and M. E. McDonul. 
train auditor, of Parkersburg, spent the day 
fishing at Hughes River and report catching 
105 fish, among them a number of fine bass. 

Joseph Newham, formerly employed as time- 
keeper in the Maintenance of Way Department , 
arrived at Grafton on July 20 and is spending 
a few days greeting old friends prior to leaving 
to join the National Guard at St. Louis. 

Miss Helen Colborn, the popular stenographer 
to division freight agent Marsh, spent her 
vacation with relatives in Virginia. 

The accompanying picture is of yard engine 
No. 1240 and, reading from left to right, fireman 
Nuckles, engineer Kellar, brakemen Nuckles 



and Newman and conductor Harvey Bledsoe. 
This crew is extremely efficient, conductor 
Bledsoe having been in charge of the yard for a 
number of years and the rest of the trainmen 
being old and reliable men. 



Wheeling Division 

Correspondents 
M. J. Sauter, Office of Superintendent 
D. F. Allread, Agent > Reader, W. Va. 

Divisional Safety Committee 

W. M. Haver Chairman, Superintendent 

P. A. Beattt Division Engineer 

T. R. Stewart Master Mechanic 

W. F. Ross Road Foreman of Engines 

C. W. Gorsuch Terminal Trainmaster 

J. A. Fleming Agent, Wheeling, W. Va. 

Dr. J. E. Hurley Medical Examiner 

M. C. Smith Claim Agent 

F. M. Garber Car Foreman 

R. A. Nease Machinist Helper 

W. C. Wright Track Supervisor 

J. Thonen Engineer 

E. L. Parker Freight Conductor 

L. C. Bomer Freight Conductor 

B. Huff Machinist 

J. E. Holler Freight Fireman 

The following letter of congratulation, from 
Dr. E. M. Parlett, chief of the Welfare Bureau, 
was received by superintendent W. M. Haver 
on August 3: 

"Permit me to congratulate the Wheeling 
baseball team, its manager and yourself upon 
winning the West Virginia District Baseball 
Championship and the Keegan Cup. 

"The intense interest displayed in the health, 
recreation and welfare of the employes on the 
Wheeling Division is a splendid example for 



w.. 




YARD ENGINE 1240 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



77 



HOLLOWAY, OHIO, YARD OFFICE FORCE 
From left to right those in the picture are: H. Burdette, Terminal Trainmaster; H. E. Van Fossen, Chief 
Desk Clerk; N.J. O'Neil, Chief Eastbound Clerk (in doorway) ; F. C. Capple, Chief Clerk to Terminal Train- 
master (in doorway); K. B. McFadden, Westbound Checker; J. E. Murphy, Assistant Yardmaster; W. tf. 
Ober, Coal Billing Agent, and Noah Warder, Call Boy 



other Divisions on the System to profit by. 
The efficiency displayed by the team, and the 
cooperative spirit manifested between the em- 
ployes and the officials may well be emulated 
by the entire System. 

"I take this occasion to again congratulate 
the Wheeling baseball team and wish it further 
well-merited success." 

Road foreman of engines J. W. Bull is con- 
fined to his home at New Martinsville by a 
sprained ankle, which is giving him much 
trouble. 

Traveling car agent O. E. Dodd, formerly 
with headquarters at Benwood and Holloway, 
and now engaged in agricultural pursuits, re- 
ports that he has been very successful in raising 
excellent crops on his farm at Hope, Indiana. 

The members of the Wheeling Division base- 
ball team left Wheeling on train No. 45. August 
3, to meet the strong Chicago Division team 
at their headquarters in Garrett, Ind. 

Among the prominent young men employed 
in the Division offices at Wheeling are David 
White, assistant chief clerk to the general 
superintendent; Bernard L. Heifer, stenog- 
rapher to the commercial freight agent, and 
Frank C. Eberly, C. T. timekeeper. 

The office vacancies which have occurred 
up to the present time have been filled by 
ladies, a total of ten now being employed in the 
Wheeling passenger station. 



Ohio River Division 

Correspondents 
E. L. Sorrell, Office of Superintendent 
R. E. Barnhart, Office of Superintendent 
W. E. Kennedy, Office of Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. W. Root Superintendent 

F. C. Mohan Trainmaster 

E. J. Langhurst Road Foreman of Engines 

O. J. Kelly Master Mechanic 

C. E. Bryan Division Engineer 

W. E. Kennedy Division Claim Agent 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

E. Chapman Captain of Police 

F. A. Carpenter Agent, Parkersburg 

S. E. Eastbcrn Agent, Yardmaster, Huntington 

H. F. Owens Secretary 

Rotating Members 

H. L. B artels Engineer 

O W . McCart i Fireman 

H. Neal Conductor 

M. F. Caldwell Brakeman 

A. C. Smith Car Department 

O. F. Taylor Locomotive Department 

E. Farrell Stores Department 



R. C. Gruver, general clerk in the Accounting 
Department, answered the call of his country 
by joining the Navy, reporting for duty at New- 
port Training School, Rhode Island, on July 31. 

The Accounting Department will lose two 
good men in the persons of Myron H. Mohler, 
transportation timekeeper and M. C. Flaherty, 
motive power timekeeper, who were among the 
first to be conscripted in Wood County. How- 
ever, duty calls them and inasmuch as both 
are single and will no doubt pass the physical 



78 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



exmaination they will probably become mem» 
bers of the National Army. 

Stuart S. Roush, chief clerk to the superin- 
tendent, is taking a much needed rest. H. C. 
Xesbitt, division accountant, is acting in his 
place in addition to attending to his other 
duties. 

F. L. McDonald, night ticket agent at O. R. 
station, was united in marriage last week to 
Miss Rebecca Banks, of Shepherdstown, W.Va. 
We extend our congratulations. 

J. E. McGraw bid in first trick at RA office, 
because of the resignation of F. Baker, who 
has accepted a position with an oil company in 
Oklahoma. Mr. McGraw has been second 
trick operator at OB for ten years. His friends 
will be pleased to see him assigned to RA. 
His position at OB is being filled by H. W. 
Bradley. 

Frank Owens, secretary to superintendent 
Root, returned last week from a two weeks' trip 
to Boston, New York and Atlantic City. 

James B. Scullin, one of our veteran em- 
ployes, is back in the service. His friends are 
glad to have him with them. 

T. J. Ball is enjoying his annual vacation 
in the west. During his stay in Indiana he 
reports having caught fish weighing respec- 
tively ninety, eighty, seventy and sixty pounds. 
We leave this statement to the readers of the 
Magazine, who, perchance, have fished in 
Indiana. 

The accompanying picture is of J. W. Wolf, 
carpenter foreman. Mr. Wolf entered the 
service on November 1, 1892, as a carpenter 
and was promoted to his present position on 
March 1, 1904. 





GEORGE BUCKHOLD, SECTION FOREMAN 
AT CLEVELAND 

Two of our former boys, Oliver Mattingly 
and "Eddie" Wilkinson, who recently joined 
Uncle Sam's forces, were end men in a minstrel 
show given by West Virginia guardsmen. 

Leroy Allen, of the division freight office, 
has returned from his vacation, a trip including 
the principal cities of the west. 

Chief clerk C. R. Grimm has returned from 
a trip to Baltimore. 

As this is our first appearance in the editorial 
world, hope the readers will bear with our 
mistakes. 



J. w. WOLF 



Cleveland Division 

Correspondent, G. B. Gymer, Secretary 
to Superintendent, Cleveland 

Divisional Safety Committee 

H. B. Green Superintendent 

G. B. Gymer Secretary 

J. J. Powers Trainmaster 

W. J. Head Trainmaster 

A. R. Carver Division Engineer 

F. W. Rhuark Master Mechanic 

P. C. Loux Road Foreman of Engines 

G. H. Kaiser Road Foreman of Engines 

A. J. Bell Terminal Agent 

A. A. Church Medical Examiner 

G. J. Maisch Claim Agent 

M. E. Tuttle Division Operator 

Rotating Members Uo serve throe months) 

\V. G. Harris Assistant Agent, East Akron 

C. H. Richards Dispatcher, Akron 

M . Cakano Section Foreman, Akron 

J. H. Myers Carpenter Foreman, Cleveland 

T.J. Bow en Conductor, Lorain 

J. A. Moore Engineer, Lorain 

M. Livingstone Eneineer, Cleveland 

J. E. Friskey Conductor, Akron 

G. C. Bell Conductor, Cleveland 

W, Reider Machinist, Cleveland 

T A. Hohn Material Checker, Lorain 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The opposite picture is of George Buckhold, 
the oldest section foreman on the Cleveland 
Division. He has been in the service of the 
Company for thirty-two years, and his services 
have been more than satisfactory. 

The picture at bottom of column is of David 
M. Pettay, of Tracy, Ohio, who has been in the 
Service for the last twenty-nine years, and is 
at present employed as carpenter foreman on 
this Division. Mr. Pettay has always given 
his best efforts to the Baltimore and Ohio. 



Newark Division 

Correspondent, W. F. Sachs, Chief Clerk 

Divisional Safety Committee 

D. F. Stevens Chairman, Superintendent, Newark, O. 

C. H. Titus Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

T. J. Daly Assistant Trainmaster, Newark, O. 

J. Tordella Division Engineer, Newark, O. 

Wm. Streck Road Foreman, Newark, O. 

W. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Newark, O. 

A. R. Claytor Division Claim Agent, Newark, O. 

D. L. Host T. M. & C. T. D., Columbus, O. 

C. G. Miller Shopman, Newark, O. 

J. A. Mitchell Conductor, Newark, O. 

W. C. Neighbarger Engineer, Newark, O. 

J. C. McVicker Fireman, Newark, O. 

W. F. Hall Car Repairman, Newark, O. 

D. E. Duffy Blacksmith, Newark, O. 

C. Rittenhouse Yard Conductor, Newark, O. 



Through the efforts of F. G. Hadley, freight 
agent at Mt. Vernon, A. W. Patton, car dis- 
tributer and his assistant D. Gettings, of Divi- 
sion headquarters, the Company secured a ship- 
ment of thirteen cars of export freight for 
Australia. These gentlemen have received 
congratulatory letters from the C. & G. Cooper 
Company of Mt. Vernon, the shippers, who 
commended them on the efficient manner in 
which the shipment was handled. 




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By F. M. PAYNE 

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Forms, For Sale, Exchange, Building and Surety- 
ship Contracts, Bonds, Mortgages, Powers of At- 
torney, Leases, Landlords' Agreements, Notice tm 
Quit, Deeds, Chattel Mortgages, etc. It gives, in 
the most condensed form, the essential Knowledge 
of the Real Estate Business. 
• Apart from the agent, operator or contractor, there 
is much to be found in its contents that will prove 
of great value to all who wish to be posted on 
Valuation. Contracts, Mortgages, Leases, Evictions, 
etc. The cost might be saved five hundred timet 
over in one transaction. 

Cloth. 256 Pages. Price $1 .00 Postpaid 




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S*. Louis 



80 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



The picture at right is of engineer and]Mrs. 
W. C. Neibarger, who were caught by the 
camera during a recent visit to the south. 

The lower picture is of a forty-ton casting 
loaded at Mt. Vernon on well car and lined up 
for movement. Brakeman A. E. Lawrence is 
shown at the left and brakeman B. Hughs at 
the right of the picture. 

Newark Shops 

A number of years ago our cheerful and 
hustling material inspector, Lee Stanford, was 
stung by a perfect specimen of the fox hunting 
bee and ever since then his hobby has been to sit 
on the hill tops in the lonely country from 
early night to the wee small hours of the 
morning, listening to his dogs make music 
while they hot foot behind Mr. Fox. What 
Lee doesn't know about fox hoimds and fox 
hunting is little or nothing, and he and his 
running mate "Babe" McKenna, machinist, 
can be seen most any nice evening driving out 
of the city with a pack of hounds behind 
their buggy, for another "big night," as they 
call it. 



Connellsville Division 

Correspondents 
P. E. Weimer, Office of Sup't, Connellsville 
S. M. DeHtjff, Manager of Telegraph Office, 

Connellsville 
C. E. Reynolds, Clerk to Ass't SupH, Somerset 

Divisional Safety Committee 

M. H. Broughton Chairman, Superintendent 

C. M. Stone Trainmaster 

T. E. Miller Master Mechanic 




MR. AND MRS. W. C. NEIBARGER 



G. N. Cage Road Foreman of Engines 

Dr. M. H. Koehler Medical Examiner 

H. B. Pigman Division Operator 

A. P. Williams Division Engineer 

H. D. Whip Relief Agent 

C. A. Albright Agent 

E . E . McDonald Agent 

W. F. Herwick Conductor 

W. J. Dayron Road Brakeman 

O. E. Newcomer Fireman 

W. H. Metzgar Supervisor 

E. C. Lucas Car Foreman 

A. L. Friel Shop Foreman 

H. E. Cochran Secretary 




FORTY TON CASTING LOADED AT MT. VERNON 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



si 



It's been just as hot every place as it was on 
the Connellsville Division, hence we won't 
devote any space to humidity subjects. 

At the time of this writing we regret vei y 
much to learn that former superintendent O. L. 
Eaton is confined to his home in Connellsville 
by serious illness. 

We are pleased to learn that train dispatcher 
C. G. Gates has resumed duty after an ex- 
tended illness. 

The fame of the Baltimore and Ohio baseball 
team of Connellsville has finally reached the 
big sheets. A recent issue of the Pittsburgh 
Gazette- Times carried an excellent, space- 
consuming photograph of C. M. Stone and H. 
Long, manager and captain of the club. Mr. 
Stone, the highly esteemed traiHmaster of this 
division, has found time, despite his strenuous 
duties, to devote sufficient attention to his 
team to make it a big success. 

John Gaal, son of conductor J. Gaal of this 
city, was drowned while bathing in the Youghi- 
ogheny River, opposite the Baltimore and Ohio 
station, on August 1. 

H. I. Penrod, station baggagemaster at Con- 
nellsville for several years, has resigned to 
accept a position in the shops at Mt. Clare. 

S. J. Tipton, formerly ticket agent at Con- 
nellsville, always manages to find opportunities 
to visit old friends here while pursuing his 
duties as travelling passenger agent. And 
'"Sam" also manages to call at the post office 
on each visit, even if he doesn't expect to find 
mail awaiting him there. 

Vacations are conspicuous by their absence 
this summer. 

The passenger depot and division head- 
quarters at Connellsville have defied the 
tardiness of summer by taking on a number of 




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624 F Street, N. W. Washington, D. C. 

improvements. Painting, both interior and 
exterior, has helped wonderfully to make the 
building more pleasing to the observer. 

"Is it a female seminary?" was asked a 
station employe some time ago by a party who 
had observed the number of young ladies 
tripping upstairs to division headquarters. 
"No, sir," replied the employe. "It's just a 
sample of 'womanhood' doing its bit in war 
times, that's all." 

The accompanying picture was taken on the 
east side of the mountain near Mance, Pa., on 
section No. 10. The two American flags and 
the "Safety First" are all made of rocks and 
stones of different colors and are noticed by all 
passengers who pass the spot in daylight. The 
size of this artistic design can be judged by 
comparison with the figures of track foreman 
T. B. Bracken and his men seated back of it on 
the ground. The picture was taken from far 
up on the mountain side. This is but one of 




' SAFETY FIRST" DESIGN ON THE SIDE OF THE MOUNTAIN NEAR MANCE, PA., 
CONSTRUCTED OF ROCKS BY CONNELLSVILLE DIVISION EMPLOYES 



Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



82 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



many evidences of the care and pride shown 
by the emplo3 r es of the Connellsville Division 
in their railroad. 

The picture at bottom is a closer view of track 
foreman Bracken and his "team" of efficient 
workers, who made the design. In doing it 
they didn't neglect their section, as a ride over 
Xo. 10 will prove. These trackmen also have 
the distinction of having purchased $1,600 
worth of Liberty Bonds. 

W. J. Emerick, telegrapher at Wyndman, 
has been doing extra work as train dispatcher 
at Connellsville for the past six weeks. It 
is W. J.'s first attempt and from all reports 
he is making good. And still another Emerick 
— B. E., a brother of W. J. — has accepted a 
position as copying operator at Connellsville. 
Surely Williams, Pa., is doing its bit to make 
the Baltimore and Ohio what it is to-day. 
Both of the Emerick brothers were "made" 
there; R. W. Hoover, at present acting night 
chief dispatcher, began his training there, and — 
but then, a person don't like to talk too much 
about oneself! But just th3 same, Williams, 
Pa., has proved itself some little incubator of 
railroad talent, eh? 

Ever hear tell of "articulating" a garden? 
Can't be done. B. W. Cole, car inspector,, 
Connellsville, will tell you that. 

Uncle Sam has the "number" of one third 
of the telegraphers on the Connellsville Divi- 
sion. 

Mr. Stone's Connellsville Division baseball 
team is making an enviable record for itself 
this season. Two decisive lickings has been 
Pittsburgh's contribution to that record. 



The "get acquainted" meeting held recently 
by our new superintendent, M. H. Broughton, 
was a big success. All present felt they knew 
Mr. Broughton when the meeting adjourned, 
which was what he desired. Speeches were 
made by several department heads and other 
emploves, and a happv evening was enjoved 
by all." 



Pittsburgh Division 

Correspondent, B. J. McQuade, Office of 
Superintendent, Pittsburgh 

Divisional Safety Committee 



T. J. Brady Chairman, Superintendent 

T. W. Barrett Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster 

W. J. Kennedy Secretary 

C. C. Cook Division Engineer 

M. C. Thompson Road Foreman of Engines 

G. W. C. Day Division Operator 

E. J. Brennan Superintendent of Shops 

F. P. Pfahler Master Mechanic 

A. J. Weise General Car Foieman 

F. Bryne Claim Agent 

W. F. Deneke Agent, Pittsburgh 

Dr. J. P. Lawlor Medical Examiner 

R. F. Langdon Brakeman 

E. D. McCaughey Fireman 

E. P. Chenowith Conductor 

J. J. Berry Foreman, Glenwood 

J. L. Solid.vy Engineer 



The first meeting of the Pittsburgh Division 
Veterans' Association was held in Odd Fellows 
Temple, Hazelwood, on July 9. 

The meeting, which was in charge of president 
William Cox, was opened by the singing of 
"America" and the "Star Spangled Banner," 
during the singing of which conductor Charles 
Lane unfurled a flag. 




TI'ACK FORK MAX T. B. BRACK EX AXD TITS TEAM OF WORKERS 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



83 




OUR NEW OUTBOUND FREIGHT HOUSE AT PITTSBURGH 



After a short business session Mr. Spielman, After a song by our quartette the president 

assistant general superintendent, spoke about introduced "King Brady" (T. J. Brady), 

our railroad and its part in the Great War, superintendent of the Pittsburgh Division, 

and what we all can do to help Uncle Sam plant Mr. Brady's talk was about the boys on our 

the Stars and Stripes of Liberty on the Palace road, and the way the veterans had assisted 

in Berlin. in bringing it up to the top-notch. Mr. Brady 



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their record of performance, that each one 
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South Bend Watches are not only guaran- 
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may transfer within five years after purchase. 

You will find these remarkable watches at 
your jeweler's, distinguished by the Purple 
Ribbon of Quality. 

SOUTH BEND WATCH CO. 
188 Studebaker St. South Bend, Ind. 




Please mention our magazine when writing advertisers 



84 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



also told us what we have been doing, and what 
we must do, to do our share on the Pittsburgh 
Division. He said we must handle at least 
five thousand cars in twenty-four hours, not 
one day in the week, but on all seven. 

After Mr. Brady had finished we were 
entertained for a few minutes by Jessie P. 
Boyles, who was loudly applauded. 

Assistant superintendent Hoskins and John 
Beltz, our river trainmaster, were called upon 
and responded with very fitting remarks. 
Then Miss Bessie J. Smith appeared upon the 
scene and sang one of her favorite solos. 

Then George W. C. Day was next, and he was 
jollowed by W. C. Weagie, terminal trainmaster, 
and W. P. trainmaster M. L. McElhaney. 

The address of the president William Cox, 
was short but interesting and to the point. 




CHILDREN OF CAR FOREMAN P. J. FIXKE 



Glenwood Shops 

Born to Mrs. George Edmunds, the wife of 
• Shep" Edmunds, painter in the roundhouse, a 
baby boy. "Shep" says that the little fellow 
is going to be a painter like his "pap." 

While it was with regret that we heard that 
our old friend "Short" Tomlinson was going 
to the back shops as erecting shop foreman,, we 
wish nim all success in his new position. 

William Mateer, material man in the round- 
house, and previously general foreman in the 
Stores Department, has left our service to 
accept a position as storekeeper on the P. & L. 
E. R. R. Go to it "Bill" — we wish you luck. 

Albert Dewalt, chief clerk to the storekeeper, 
has left our service to accept a position with 
the Atlantic Refining Company. 

George R. Galloway, assistant master 
mechanic at Glenwood, has been promoted to 
master mechanic at Cleveland. We wish him 
all the success possible. He was succeeded by 
John Howe, from Mount Clare, well known at 
this station, where he was previously boiler- 
maker foreman in the back shops. 

The accompanying picture was taken while 
carpenter foreman Alexander Havalescik was 




on a hunting trip at Red Cone Creek, Beaver 
County. Those in the picture, reading from 
left to right, are: Mr. Havalescik's sister, Mr. 
and Mrs. Havalescik and their niece. The boy 
is a farmer's boy of the neighborhood. 

The above picture is of the children of 
car foreman P. J. Finke. From left to right 
they are Loretta, age seven, Margaret, age 
eleven, and Annie, age nine. You will notice a 
number of their pets with which they spend 
most of their time while at home. 



ALEXANDER HAVALESCIK AND FAMILY 



New Castle Division 

Correspondent, J. A. Lloyd, Chief Clerk 
to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 

C. W. VanHorn Chairman, Superintendent 

CP. Angell Trainmaster 

D. W. Cronin Division Engineer 

J.J. McGuirk Master Mechanic 

T. K. Faherty Road Foreman of Engines 

James Aiken Agent, Youngstown, O. 

Dr. F. Dorsey Medical Examiner 

C. G. Osborne Division Claim Ageot 

F. H. Knox Agent, New Castle, Pa. 

W. P. Cahili Division Operator 

W. Damron Terminal Trainmaster 

A. T. Humbert Master Carpenter 

Rotating Members (to serve three months) 

E. F. Toepfer Road Engineer 

G. T. Griffith Road Fireman 

H. A. Bradley Road Conductor 

S. K. Fielding Yard Engineer 

L. Whalen Pipefitter 

J. W. Ferron Work Checker, Car Department 

George W. Miles, car distributer, who en- 
listed in the headquarters company of the 
I n st Pennsylvania Field Artillery, has been 
promoted to corporal, Signal Corps. His 
many friends wish him well. 

C. H. DeArment, yardmaster at DeForest 
Junction, has been appointed car distributer in 
place of Mr. Miles, who has been furloughed. 

The many friends of former master mechanic 
.1. J. McCuire will be interested to know that 
as i first lieutenant in the Ninth Regiment 

Engineers (railroad) he is enjoying good health 
MM is ready for foreign service. 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



8.") 



H. W. Bates, clerk to the trainmaster, has 
resigned to accept employment in another 
business and Edward J. Raidy, stenographer 
to the trainmaster, has been promoted to fill 
his position. 

Train dispatcher E. A. Goehring has been 
bereaved by the loss of his mother, which 
occurred on July 26. The sympathy of the 
employes of the Division is extended to him. 

In looking through his mother's papers, Mr. 
Goehring foimd a schedule for a special train 
to be run December 25, 1878, issued by Joseph 
Ramsey, superintendent of the Pittsburgh, 
New Castle and Lake Erie Railroad Company, 
now the Baltimore and Ohio. Mr. Goehring's 
father was an engineer at that time and the 
schedule was kept by him. The line at that 
time was narrow gauge and the special instruc- 
tions were to run carefully over all road cross- 
ings and bad places, and not to exceed five 
miles per hour through No. 2 and No. 3 tunnels. 
The special ran from Pittsburgh to Zelienople 
and return, leaving Pittsburgh at 10.00 a. m., 
arriving at Zelienople at 12.58 a. m., leaving 
on the return trip at 1.10 p. m., and arriving 
at Pittsburgh at 4.25 p. m. 

The list of veterans on the New Castle 
Division would not be complete without the 
name of F. H. Roper, now employed as track 
foreman on Section 44, on the Lake Branch of 
the Division. 

On June 1 of this year foreman Roper had 
served the Company continuously for thirty- 
one years. Born on February 4, 1862, he was 
twenty-four years of age when he first accepted 
a job as a trackman. About eight years 
afterwards he assumed the duties of track 
foreman, the position which he still fills. 

Mr. Roper is a man of pleasing personality, 




F. H. ROPER 




E. T. GILMORE 



is hard working and ambitious and has a host 
of friends among the employes on the Lake 
Branch. His loyalty to the Company and 
his dependability is a matter of record, and 
to know him is to know one of the best types of 
men, one who finds it a pleasure to serve faith- 
fully and honestly and, in the furthering of 
his personal interest, to loyally champion the 
betterment of the Company with which he 
has elected to labor. 

In E. T. Gilmore, carpenter foreman at 
Painesville, Ohio, the New Castle Division 
can boast of having one of the real "Old Tim- 
ers." During thirty-eight years of continuous 
service foreman Gilmore has seen many changes 
and improvements and, to use his own words, 
"We can now safely say that we are working 
for a first class railroad company." 

Mr. Gilmore was born in September, 1846. 
and entered the service of the Painesville and 
Youngstown Railroad on August 24, 1879, 
serving eight years as master carpenter. 
After the reorganization under the Pittsburgh 
and Western Company he was made carpenter 
foreman and twelve years later, when the 
Baltimore and Ohio had taken over the inter- 
ests of the Pittsburgh and Western Company, 
he was retained as carpenter foreman, the 
position which he has held since then. Mr. 
Gilmore has been a member of the Relief 
Department for twenty-four years, and is a 
firm believer in the benefits derived through it . 

In Mr. Gilmore the Company has a conscien- 
tious employe, whose pride in his work is 
clearly indicated in the thorough manner in 
which, the men in his gang perform their various 
tasks. Conditions have changed wonderfully 
since he entered railroad work, but he has 
not changed, except that he improves with 
age. He is as kindly and agreeable as ever, 



86 



THE BALTIMORE AND OHIO EMPLOYES MAGAZINE 



faithfully carrying on the work of his depart- 
ment at Painesville, with intense interest in all 
of his men, with constant efficiency and absolute 
loyalty. 



Chicago Division 

Correspondent, P. G. Ervin, Assistant 
Chief Clerk to Superintendent 

Divisional Safety Committee 



J. H. Jackson Chairman, Superintendent, Garrett, Ind. 

T. J. Rogers. . . . Vice-Chairman, Trainmaster, Gairett, Ind. 

T. E. Jamison Trainmaster, Garrett, Ind. 

John Tordella Division Engineer, Garrett, Ind. 

G. P. Palmer Division Engineer, Chicago, 111. 

D. B. Taylor Master Carpenter, Garrett, Ind. 

F. N. Shultz Division Operator, Garrett, Ind. 

\Y. F. Moran Master Mechanic, Garrett, Ind. 

D. Hartle Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

J. E. Fisher Road Foreman of Engines, Garrett, Ind. 

J. D. Jack Claim Agent, Garrett, Ind. 

W. A. Funk Medical Examiner, Garrett, Ind. 

C. W. Hedrick Medical Examiner, Chicago Jet., O. 

John Draper Agent, Chicago, 111. 

Henry Bergstrom Machinist, South Chicago, 111. 

W. P. Allman Agent, A villa, Ind. 

C. A. Hamilton Engineer, Garrett Ind. 

C. H. Keys Fireman, Garrett, Ind. 

N. D. Scott Conductor, Deshler, O. 

David Wagner Brakeman, Garrett, Ind. 

Robert Kipp Yard Brakeman, Chicago Jet., O. 

W. A. Miller Car Builder, Garrett, Ind. 

H. Schneider Car Inspector, South Chicago, 111. 

L. C. Beeber Pipefitter, Garrett, Ind. 

Julius Leitz Pipefitter, Chicago Junction, O. 



J. H. Johnston, clerk in the office of the 
division accountant, and Mrs. Johnston, are 
-pending their vacation visiting cities in the 
cast. 

Miss Clarice Horn has assumed the steno- 
graphic duties of Miss Myrtle Whirledge, who 
has been off duty the past few weeks because 
of sickness. 

' The accompanying picture is of Darrell 
Dwayne Thompson, son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Guy Thompson. The proud father is employed 
as a locomotive fireman and has been in the 
service for a number of years. At the age of 
three months the baby tipped the scales at 
twenty-three pounds. 




DARRELL DWAYNE THOMPSON 



C. T. Meek, for the past three years em- 
ployed as time clerk in the office of the division 
accountant, has resigned to accept one with the 
Bowser Tank Company, of Fort Wayne, Ind. 
We are sorry to see Carl leave, but wish him all 
the success possible in his new position. 

The regular monthly Safety meeting was 
held at Lake Wawasee, Ind., on July 11. The 
meeting was called to order at 11.30 a. m., 
superintendent Jackson presiding. There was 
a recess at 1.30 p. m., when the members of the 
committee were joined at dinner by their wives 
and families. The meeting again convened at 
2.30 p. m., and after the completion of business, 
addresses were made by John Hair and J. H. 
Jackson. Despite inclement weather the day 
was pleasantly spent. Musical selections were 
given by Mrs. J. H. Greene and Mrs. J. W. 
Thompson and by R. R. Jenkins, secretary of 
the Chicago Junction Y. M. C. A. The trip 
from Garrett was made by automobile. 

Arthur M. Dinsmore, for the past few months 
employed as brakeman on the Chicago Divi- 
sion, has been called for service in the Officers' 
Reserve Corps at Fort Benjamin Harrison. 
He left for Indianapolis on July 16. 

Effective June 1 G. E. Cotton was appointed 
storekeeper at Garrett, vice F. W. Gettle, 
transferred to Connellsville, Pa., in the same 
capacity. 

Effective August 1 J. A. Tschuor was ap- 
pointed general foreman at Chicago Junction, 
Ohio, vice E. F. Creel, who has been assigned 
to other duties. 



South Chicago 

Correspondent, Mrs. Bertha A. Phelps 
Wheelage Clerk 

We recently received a very pleasant and 
interesting call from W. S. Skimi